Author Topic: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon  (Read 28139 times)

Offline Muxel

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #45 on: April 03, 2012, 11:50:33 PM »
I wrote in the cryogenic chamber therapy thread:

Just want to say that I have no plans to immerse myself in ice baths.  No until the ice age arrives and I have no choice!  I think all that Kruse had uncovered/theorized is very interesting, but I also think he has an idee fixe and is searching through all the literature with that idea and picking out everything that matches and perhaps ignoring what does not.

Surely, humans evolved in warmer climates also, and since then, genes are very mixed all over the world, so there is no "one size fits all" solution, though there do seem to be a few general principles that are useful for everyone with only rare exceptions.

He's fixated upon an idea because... A strange woman came up to him with a book and scientific papers, then one day, at the statue of David, he was overcome by an epiphany - Factor X - and fell to his knees, with tears running down his face. (I did not make any of that up lol)

The rest - his blog, research, wild experimentation, success and fame - is history. Well, almost. He remains tight-lipped on Factor X until May, when his book comes out and he goes on the Jimmy Moore cruise. He throws out cryptic breadcrumbs in this thread: _http://forum.jackkruse.com/showthread.php?43-What-the-H-is-Factor-X-Post-your-guesses

His reason for ignoring evidence-based scientific research is, none of them were done on cold-adapted people. Those involving animals, were not done on "higher animals" with the same pathways that we do. He "received" a thought, and tested his thought...so it sounds like the Cassiopaean experiment, no?

Jack's been taking his followers on a journey. First leptin, then cold, and when all systems are ready, Factor X. I can't draw any conclusions about Jack until I know what Factor X is - and I've been obsessed!
:nuts: :D

P.S. Yeah I'm not icing too...for logistic reasons. But I walk around in winter, when everybody else is using cars, so I get more cold than most.
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Offline dugdeep

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #46 on: April 04, 2012, 02:19:31 AM »
Jack's been taking his followers on a journey. First leptin, then cold, and when all systems are ready, Factor X. I can't draw any conclusions about Jack until I know what Factor X is - and I've been obsessed!
:nuts: :D

I've noticed that about a lot of his fan-base, actually. They all seem to be rabid, overly enthusiastic bordering on guru worship. It's kind of odd. I guess his writing has that effect on people, which is equally odd, since I find most of what I've read by him impenatrable and vague. Maybe I just don't get it  :huh:

Online nicklebleu

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #47 on: April 04, 2012, 06:11:25 AM »
I've been reading  up on JK's website quite a bit over the last week and I am intrigued. He certainly has studied biochemistry and physiology very well. But I also agree with others on this site that he seems a bit monomanic. Anyway, I am looking forward to his book which I certainly will read as soon as it is available. I think, he is on to something, but he has not fully worked it out yet.

Australian aboriginal people come to mind, who clearly would be warm adapted for the major  part of the year. Maybe during the dry season (June to August), they might get slightly cooler temps. They certainly used to live a relatively low-carb lifestyle - maybe not zero-carb like Inuits, but certainly nowhere near the levels of carbs they ingest nowadays - with  the obvious consequences, a horrific amount of "civilisatory diseases" at very young age (cardiovascular disease, renal failure, type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer etc.). The guys still living on the outstations however are skinny like anything, just muscles and tendons, grow old healthy and fit. So I think that evolution has given us enough time to adapt our bodies to warm climates. But maybe that adaptation is not as prefect as the cold adaptation and we still keep that program hidden in our metabolism for a rainy day ...

At this stage I don't plan to cold adapt, because I  live in the tropics most of the year and it's just too hard to do here. However I regularly move to colder (as in very cold climates) on a regular basis - and next time I do this I certainly will try it. Maybe I will precondition myself a bit shortly before I leave, just to ease the transition.

Cold baths? Don't think I  would have too much trouble to do that, just not sure if that alone  would be sufficient. A whole-body cryo chamber is nowhere near where I live, so that falls by the wayside too.

Even though I live in the  tropics, I don't plan at this stage to give up my paleo diet either - it has worked fabulously well for me on many levels - last but not  least on a mental level. Gone are the mood-swings (according to my wife, who attributes it to something else ...), I feel much more energized and tolerant to problems (and MAN, have I had a rotten 12 months just passed!).

Other than that for the time being I will sit tight and wait for the next ice age - can't wait for the temperatures in my part of the world to come down a tad (although I read somewhere  that temps in the southern hemisphere during the last ice age weren't very much different from today).
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Offline Muxel

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #48 on: April 04, 2012, 07:53:10 AM »
Factor X main clues:
Quote from: http://jackkruse.com/cold-thermogenesis-three/#comment-28403
People in the tropics also have a growing season, a rainy season, a dry season when carbs are seasonally low. Even at the equator. Biology can not be constantly turned on without consequence. The proof of that is America. this is why we are overrun with AD now. It came out of no where in 60 yrs. Why? Speed of epigenetics with carbs and PUFA mix in the SAD………anything that you add to the mix that is pro growth or anti circadian cycle destroys our biology. Your lineage matters but that is genomic info……..genomic info is not as important as epigenonic info because the epigenome rapidly adapts to our environment to set our entire biochemistry. That is why its speed is a critical component to the mathematical models of power laws and why biology uses it for ultimate survival. cellular theory of relativity is ND=(somatic genomic stability)(speed of epigenetic control of the genome) squared. This is eerily similar to E-mc2. I no longer think it is a coincidence and we better pay attention to it.

Yesterdays Paleo problem was the SAD…….people rallied around it and adopted it. Todays’s Paleo battle is technology and eating carbs in cycle or face shorter telomeres.
Quote from: http://forum.jackkruse.com/showthread.php?43-What-the-H-is-Factor-X-Post-your-guesses/page61&p=6038#post6038
E=mc2 for chemistry and physics.

S=x(Factor X)2 is the mathematical equation for biology.
Quote from: http://jackkruse.com/cold-thermogenesis-5/
Accordingly, any decrease in temperature will induce an exponential decrease of the reaction rate [...]. [...] This is the main factor preventing the growth, at low temperatures, of non-adapted organisms.  So biochemistry of cold says we should have slow growth patterns based upon the biochemistry. I told you earlier that evolution has sped up tremendously as time has gone on. So the question remains is, how did evolution overcome slower growth? Since the cell cycle was slowed by cold it sped up epigenetics to compensate for the slower growth.  That is the basis of FACTOR X.  It is the most important part of my theory because it is why the human brain was naturally selected for in a mismatched environment.

With Jack, everything's all over the place. But see, he has a mosaic picture, and he writes from that mosaic picture, cunningly omitting Factor X of course. He also wrote when he was in "pain" from that surgery. His writing annoyed me at first, but I've grown to like his ideas and can forgive the shoddy packaging. (The Matrix isn't gonna let Ultimate Truths be made available THAT easily...) And, chatting about diet/health stuff is fun but gets boring after a while, and Jack is the first Paleo "guru" to put diet in a bigger unified context! I mean, quantum biology?!

For example, Jack says if we want a nice facade and short telomeres, stick with Paleo 2.0. This is because eating Paleo, while warm-adapted, makes our systems work top-notch so we feel great, when we really are hastening our telomere depletion silently, because it's a fatal combo of pro-growth + circadian mismatch. He dares the Paleo advocates to take telomere tests, he says all of them will find their telomere ages drastically shorter than their chronological ages.

That's why I like Jack. He has the big picture, or A big picture. And, lol, the forumers here would also be guilty of enthusiasm, considering how fast they jumped onto Cryo, and how soon they talked about buying units to open a Cryo business... :lol:
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Offline Muxel

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #49 on: April 04, 2012, 09:11:41 AM »
I think Factor X is frequency. Frequency - two letters - Hz (hertz!)
I posted my guess as a comment on Jack's site (my username is 'Wickerchair') to test it.

Update: Got a "nope" from Jack. My question was comment #107 and his full reply was comment #110 on the 'CT 8' blog entry.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 04:09:12 PM by Muxel »
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Offline Laura

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #50 on: April 04, 2012, 12:27:54 PM »
And we can even look at bigger cycles. Like glacials and interglacials. Jack subscribes to the aquatic ape theory, so could that be another "cycle"? Coming out of cold water onto sunny land? (Maybe the aquatic ape theory is wrong, and it's just to symbolize how we came from the water in the womb.)

Well, all things considered, I think the aquatic ape hypothesis is going in the right direction, but not necessarily that we spent all our time in cold water.  Being able to spend SOME time in cold water is, of course, useful, but there might have been a more than equivalent amount of time spent in warmer environments.  After all, hominid type creatures started working with fire a very, very long time ago, and that was in conjunction with cooking, which was in conjunction with the increase in brain size, so perhaps, warmth/fire can be connected to becoming fully human?

Indeed, we have many archaic systems within our bodies, including the archaic vagal response, but activating it can kill us. 
He who learns must suffer
And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget
Falls drop by drop upon the heart,
And in our own despair, against our will,
Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
Agamemnon, Aeschylus

Offline Approaching Infinity

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #51 on: April 08, 2012, 03:44:30 AM »
Well, all things considered, I think the aquatic ape hypothesis is going in the right direction, but not necessarily that we spent all our time in cold water.  Being able to spend SOME time in cold water is, of course, useful, but there might have been a more than equivalent amount of time spent in warmer environments.  After all, hominid type creatures started working with fire a very, very long time ago, and that was in conjunction with cooking, which was in conjunction with the increase in brain size, so perhaps, warmth/fire can be connected to becoming fully human?

Indeed, we have many archaic systems within our bodies, including the archaic vagal response, but activating it can kill us.

I think the bolded part is the main point. For example, watch this video with a Native American woman talking about what things used to be like: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_rw5uaLccQ&feature=endscreen&NR=1

To summarize a bit, she says that the Natives simply didn't have easily accessible hot water. That's a "newfangled" thing that was totally foreign to their way of life. As it was, when a baby was born, they put it in the water (i.e. cold water) in order for it to grow up strong and healthy. They bathed in the cold waters, and used them as a way to 'cool off' emotionally when tempers flared, to control the males' hormones and aggression in particular, and to cold-adapt for the hunts in the winter. So while these tribes weren't spending all their time in the ice, like the Inuit, they were still cold-adapted. I remember reading in a book recently (not sure which, might have been Shumaker's In Search of Happiness), where the author relates the story of a woman in some country standing and working in very cold water, but she wasn't bothered by it. Her pain threshold was higher, the author said.

And I think that's part of the point. Most of us are so used to the comfort of hot water that we don't have even a normal amount of cold adaptation (i.e. short times spent in cold water). What is just too cold for us would've been nothing to a hunter-gatherer who simply bathed in the river (even the Ganges in India is 50-60 F/10-15 C). So when you consider that the standard diet is all carbs, we stay up late with artificial light, and our bodies are always warm, the signal our bodies are getting is that it's always summer. I listened to Kruse's latest podcast the other day, and he thinks that even if you correct just 1 of those things, yes you'll feel benefits, but your body will still be getting mixed signals. There needs to be SOME seasonal variation, even if it's just a bit when living closer to the equator.
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Offline voyageur

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2012, 07:20:56 AM »
Quote from: Approaching Infinity
...
I think the bolded part is the main point. For example, watch this video with a Native American woman talking about what things used to be like: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_rw5uaLccQ&feature=endscreen&NR=1
...

Thank you for this.  :)
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Offline Odyssey

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #53 on: April 16, 2012, 05:37:11 PM »
After about 7 weeks on the leptin reset I think I've having some signs of being leptin sensitive.  My hair is less brittle and breaky.  My nails are stronger and haven't broken or torn on the sides.  I'm getting sleepier in the late evening also.  I heat up after eating and at various times of the day and night.  Sometimes I'll wake at night and find that I've pushed the covers off of me.  When I pay attention, I feel like I have a little heater inside of me.  I've also noticed increase in libido as evidenced by sexual dreams and thoughts.  I'll see if all this continues.

With the cold baths my warmup time afterwards is pretty easy.  As suggested on Kruse's blog I don't dry off and get dressed immediately after the bath.  This helps a lot and seems to keep the shivering to a bare minimum.  It also seems to keep my feet from staying super cold.

I haven't weighed myself in a while but I continue to lose inches everywhere.  If I've measured correctly I lost about 3inches from the fattest part of my midsection.

Offline Prodigal Son

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #54 on: April 16, 2012, 05:47:16 PM »
After about 7 weeks on the leptin reset I think I've having some signs of being leptin sensitive.  My hair is less brittle and breaky.  My nails are stronger and haven't broken or torn on the sides.  I'm getting sleepier in the late evening also.  I heat up after eating and at various times of the day and night.  Sometimes I'll wake at night and find that I've pushed the covers off of me.  When I pay attention, I feel like I have a little heater inside of me.  I've also noticed increase in libido as evidenced by sexual dreams and thoughts.  I'll see if all this continues.

With the cold baths my warmup time afterwards is pretty easy.  As suggested on Kruse's blog I don't dry off and get dressed immediately after the bath.  This helps a lot and seems to keep the shivering to a bare minimum.  It also seems to keep my feet from staying super cold.

I haven't weighed myself in a while but I continue to lose inches everywhere.  If I've measured correctly I lost about 3inches from the fattest part of my midsection.
I've noticed that too, after the longer sessions in the cold water bath. 

Thanks for the tip about drying off later, I'll give that a go and see how it goes.  Starting the full immersion, in 5 minute increments is proving tough, especially on the arms!
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Online nicklebleu

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #55 on: April 27, 2012, 01:45:16 AM »
Had a look on the net about reverse T3, as I was not familiar with the concept. I came across a good overview that I would like to share.
The source of the article is here.

Quote
Reverse T3 and Reverse T3 Dominance

The thyroid gland is located in the lower part of the neck near your Adam’s Apple. It secretes two essential thyroid hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) which are responsible for regulating cell metabolism in every cell in your body. They promote optimal growth, development, function and maintenance of all body tissues. They are also critical for nervous, skeletal and reproductive tissue as well as regulating body temperature, heart rate, body weight and cholesterol.

In a healthy patient a normal thyroid gland secretes all of the circulating T4 (about 90 to 100mcg daily) and about 20% of the circulating T3. The T4 made by the thyroid gland circulates throughout the body and is converted by the 5-deiodinase and 5′-deiodinase enzymes into roughly equal amounts of T3 and reverse T3, respectively. Most of the biological activity of thyroid hormones is due to T3. It has a higher affinity for thyroid receptors and is approximately 4 times more potent than T4. Because 80% of serum T3 is derived from T4 in tissues such as the liver and kidney, T4 is considered a pro-hormone. No receptors have ever been identified for T4. Normal physiological production ratio of T4 to T3 is 3.3:1.

Reverse T3 (rT3) is virtually inactive having only 1% the activity of T3 and being a T3 antagonist binds to T3 receptors blocking the action of T3 and thus acting as a metabolic break. Normal metabolism of T4 requires the production of the appropriate ratio, or balance, of T3 to rT3. If the proportion of rT3 dominates then it will antagonize T3 thus producing hypothyroid symptoms despite sufficient circulating levels of T4 and T3. Reverse T3 has the same molecular structure as T3 however its three dimensional arrangement (stereochemistry) of atoms is a mirror image of T3 and thus fits into the receptor upside down without causing a thyroid response and thus preventing or antagonizing the active T3 from binding to the receptor acting as a metabolic break.

Reverse T3 dominance, also known as Wilson’s Syndrome, is a condition that exhibits most hypothyroid symptoms although circulating levels of T3 and T4 are within normal test limits. The metabolism of T4 into rT3 is in excess when compared to T3 therefore it is a T4 metabolism malfunction rather than a straight forward thyroid deficiency. Periods of prolonged stress may cause an increase in cortisol levels as the adrenal glands respond to the stress. The high cortisol levels inhibit the 5-deiodinase enzyme and thus the conversion of T4 into T3 thus reducing active T3 levels. The conversion of T4 is then shunted towards the production of the inactive rT3 via the 5′-deiodinase enzyme. This rT3 dominance may persist even after the stress passes and cortisol levels have returned to normal as the rT3:T3 imbalance itself may also inhibit the 5-deiodinase enzyme thus perpetuating the production of the inactive rT3 isomer. There is some argument to this last point with some research indicating that the elevated rT3 is only temporary and not a permanent condition and in most healthy people this may well be the case. We have however found that in many patients suffering from a range of hypothyroid symptoms do indeed have prolonged elevated rT3 levels which respond favorably to this treatment. Many medical practitioners do not accept rT3 dominance theory and thus many doctors will refuse to treat this condition despite the fact many suffers have been successfully treated. See below for the evidence in the references.

Other causes of reverse T3 dominance include: leptin resistance, inflammation (NF kappa-B), Extreme dieting, nutrient deficiencies such as low iron, selenium, zinc, chromium, Vit B6 and B12, Vit D and iodine (including Ferritin), Insulin dependent Diabetes, Low Vit B12, ageing, all forms of stress such as Burns/thermal injury, Chemical exposure, Cold exposure, Chronic alcohol intake, Free radical load, Hemorrhagic shock, Liver disease, Kidney disease, Severe or systemic illness, severe injury, Surgery, Toxic metal exposure.

Diagnosis

In addition to considering T3 levels we also need to consider rT3 because if it is too high it will block the effects of T3 thus producing hypothyroid symptoms. If this is the case the TSH, T4 and T3 tests alone will give a false impression of true thyroid function and therefore you must also measure rT3 in order to diagnose this condition. Ideally the ratio of T3/rT3 multiplied by 100 should be between 1.06 to 2.2 – preferably towards the upper end of this range. If this ratio is at the low end of this range or below then rT3 dominance is present and slow release T3 therapy needs to be initiated once adrenal exhaustion, hypoglycemia, nutritional deficiencies and/or low sex hormone levels have been ruled out and/or treated as they can all inhibit 5-deiodinase activity. In addition nutrients such as selenium, zinc, Vit B6, B12 and E, iron and iodine should be supplemented as they are necessary cofactors for this enzyme to function correctly and thus ensure appropriate T3 production.

It is also very important that if elevated levels of cortisol are found (stage 1 adrenal exhaustion) it should be treated first because if it remains elevated it will only continue to inhibit the 5-deiodinase enzyme and thus continue rT3 production reducing the effectiveness of this treatment. Low cortisol levels should also be treated because low cortisol will reduce the number of T3 receptors and also prevent T3 transport within the cell, again  impeding improvement while on this treatment. In addition some patients respond poorly to thyroid medication if adrenal fatigue is present. Therefore we recommend you test adrenal function and correct it before commencing this treatment.

In summary you should have the following tested: DHEA, cortisol, TSH, T3, T4 and reverse T3.

Treatment

It is important that no T4 (thyroxine), including Armour Thyroid, is used for this condition as a portion of the supplemented T4 will only be converted into rT3 and perpetuate the vicious cycle. The idea is to use slow release T3 to provide the active thyroid hormone to alleviate hypothyroid symptoms and to rebalance the T3/rT3 ratio without the risk of increasing rT3 production. This will allow rT3 levels to diminish over time and thus for T3 to be able to bind to its receptors and thus be effective. It is critical that rT3 levels are reduced in order to achieve a positive therapeutic outcome.

Dr Wilson developed a protocol using cycled doses of slow release T3 based on body temperature. A major problem with this protocol is that in many cases very high non physiological doses of T3 are required (90 to 120mcg daily) before a normal body temperature is obtained. In addition it does not necessarily address all the underlying problems of what caused the inhibition of the 5-deiodinase enzyme to begin with such as adrenal imbalances and nutritional deficiencies. It is also a complicated protocol that many patients find confusing. The assumption with this protocol is that high dose T3 will suppress TSH causing a reduction in T4 production. With little or no T4 left in the system reverse T3 can no longer be produced and eventually whatever is already present in the body will be eliminated thus reducing overall reverse T3 levels. The 5-deiodinase enzyme will then no longer be inhibited by the rT3 allowing the appropriate activation of T4 into the active T3 form to occur once the dose of T3 has ceased and thyroid production has recommenced. Unfortunately the risk of high dose T3 causing hyperthyroid symptoms is high and should be avoided if possible.

Our preference is to supplement with a combination capsule (thyroid conversion capsules) which contains selenium, zinc, chromium, Vit B6 and B12, iron, Vit D and iodine as they are all required by the 5-deiodinase enzyme responsible for proper T3 production while the chromium helps control insulin resistance which can also impede conversion.  Adrenals are also addressed to make sure both DHEA and cortisol levels are within the optimal range to ensure they are not affecting conversion. Finally slow release T3 capsules are also used to obtain an appropriate T3:rT3 balance. Slow release capsules work best as they prevent peak concentrations of T3 after 1 to 2hrs often observed with tablets which are responsible for the side effects associated with T3. Begin by taking 10mcg T3 SR daily and adjust from there. Symptoms should be monitored for improvement in energy levels and an increase in body temperature (ideally underarm temperature above 36.5C). The dose should be gradually adjusted until levels are adequate and balanced.

Symptoms for hyperthyroid such as sweating, anxiety, palpitations, etc must also be monitored for and doses reduced at the first sign of these symptoms appearing. Care should be taken not to allow the pulse rate to remain above 100 beats / minute, or more than about 20 beats / minute faster than before treatment.

We have found that by using a consistent low dose of T3 over two to three months without the need of cycling the dose, as described by Dr Wilson, in addition to addressing the causes of improper T4 metabolism, many patients have responded favorably with improved symptoms and a reduction in reverse T3 levels.

REFERENCES

Peripheral Metabolism of Thyroid Hormones: A Review.  Alternative Medicine Review, August, 2000 by Greg Kelly
Under normal conditions, 45-50 percent of the daily production of T4 is transformed into rT3. Substantial individual variation in these percentages can be found secondary to a range of environmental, lifestyle, and physiological influences[1] Although an adequate understanding of the metabolic role of rT3 is somewhat limited, it is thought to be devoid of hormonal activity and to act as the major competitive inhibitor of T3 activity at the cellular level.[2] Experimental data also suggests rT3 has inhibitory activity on 5′-deiodinase,[3] suggesting it might also directly interfere with the generation of T3 from T4.
[1.] Chopra IJ. An assessment of daily production and significance of thyroidal secretion of 3,3′,5′ triiodthyronine (reverse T3) in man. J Clin Invest 1976:58:32-40.
[2.] Robbins J. Factors altering thyroid hormone metabolism. Environ Health Perspect 1981;38:65-70.
[3.] Kohrle J, Spanka M, Irmscher K, Hesch RD. Flavonoid effects on transport, metabolism and action of thyroid hormones. Prog Clin Biol Res 1988;280:323-340.

A study of extrathyroidal conversion of thyroxine (T4) to 3,3’,5-triiodothyronine (T3) in vitro. Endocrinology;101(2):453-63. Chopra IJ

Many endocrinologists believe that reverse T3 (3,3’,5-triodothyronine) is only an inactive metabolite with no physiologic effect. This is an erroneous belief as this and other studies demonstrate that reverse T3 (rT3) is a more potent in­hibitor of T4 to T3 conversion than propylthiouracil (PTU) which is a medication used to decrease thyroid function in hyperthyroidism. In fact, rT3 is 100 times more potent than PTU at reducing T4 to T3 conversion. Clearly demonstrating that rT3 not just an inactive metabolite, but rather a potent inhibitor of tissue thyroid levels. The authors conclude, “Reverse t3 appeared to inhibit the conversion of t4 to T3 with a potency which is about 100 times more than PTU…”

Thyroid Hormone Concentrations, Disease, Physical Function and Mortality in Elderly Men. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 2005; 90(12):6403–6409.

Annewieke W. van den Beld, Theo J. Visser, Richard A. Feelders, Diederick E. Grobbee, and Steven W. J. Lamberts Department of Internal Medicine , University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands

This study of 403 men investigated the association between TSH, T4, free T4, T3, TBG and reverse T3 (rT3) and parameters of physical functioning. This study demonstrates that TSH and/or T4 levels are poor indicators of tissue thyroid levels and thus, in a large percentage of patients, cannot be used to determine whether a person has normal thyroid levels at the tissue level. This study demonstrates that rT3 inversely correlates with physical performance scores and that the T3/rT3 ratio is currently the best indicator of tissue levels of thyroid.

This study showed that increased T4 and RT3 levels and decreased T3 levels are associated with hypothyroidism at the tissue level with diminished physical func­tioning and the presence of a catabolic state (breakdown of the body). Low T3 syndrome, with low T3 and high reverse T3, is almost always missed when using standard thyroid function tests, as the T3 level is often in the low normal range and reverse T3 is the high normal range, again making the T3/rT3 ratio the most useful marker for tissue hypothyroidism and as a marker of diminished cel­lular functioning. The authors of this study conclude, “Subjects with low T3 and high reverse T3 had the lowest PPS [PPS is a scoring system that takes into account normal activities of daily living and is a measure of physical and mental function­ing]…Furthermore, subjects with high reverse T3 concentrations had worse physical performance scores and lower grip strength. These high rT3 levels were accompanied by high FT4 levels (within the normal range)…These changes in thyroid hormone concentrations may be explained by a decrease in peripheral thyroid hormone me­tabolism… Increasing rT3 levels could then represent a catabolic state, eventually proceeding an overt low T3 syndrome.”

This study demonstrates that TSH and T4 levels are poor measures of tissue thyroid levels, TSH and T4 levels should not be relied upon to determine the tissue thyroid levels and that the best estimate of the tissue thyroid effect is the rT3 level and the T3/rT3 ratio.

“Elevation in reverse triiodothyronine level is also seen as a consequence of diminished use of thyroxine, diminished thyroxine-to-triiodothyronine conversion, and diminished tissue levels of triiodothyronine. And “obtaining free triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, and triiodothyronine/reverse-triiodothyronine ratios may help obtain a more accurate evaluation of tissue thyroid status and may be useful to predict those who may respond favorably to triiodothyronine supplementation”

Erika T. Schwartz, MD, Kent Holtorf, MD, Hormones in Wellness and Disease Prevention: Common Practices, Current State of the Evidence, and Questions for the Future. Prim Care Clin Office Pract 35 (2008) 669–705

So the major information for me here is, that there should be a balance of T3/rT3 that tends towards T3 (and should not be reversed, that is below 1). I was going to measure my rT3 (together with leptin) to assess my leptin resistance, but wasn't sure how to interpret the rT3 result.
Also interesting the cofactors involved in the conversion, which might have to be supplemented to reverse this process.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2012, 01:47:46 AM by nicklebleu »
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Offline Muxel

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #56 on: May 04, 2012, 11:12:06 PM »
Just got this email:
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Dear _____,

Time for our May Webinar Announcement! Go ahead and circle your calendars for Saturday, May 19th at 11AM Central. I will be revealing FactorX LIVE!

Buy your webinar ticket online at Jackkruse.com to get in on this highly anticipated event.

Hurry, there are only 100 seats open. Buy your ticket today!

Here's to living an optimized life,

Dr. Jack Kruse

P.S.
The webinar recording, after the event, will be available to Klub
and Karnivore members only.
Purify self.

Offline dugdeep

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #57 on: May 09, 2012, 02:54:41 AM »
Well this is just bizarre. Apparently Dr. Kruse was the target of a "cyber attack" that lead to the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, etc. kicking him off the "Low Carb Cruise" he was scheduled to speak at.

From _http://www.cruiselawnews.com/2012/05/articles/weird-cruise-news/bioterrorism-tweet-leads-carnival-cruise-line-to-kick-dr-kruse-off-low-carb-cruise/

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Bio-Terrorism Tweet Leads Carnival Cruise Line to Kick Dr. Kruse Off Low Carb Cruise
Posted on May 8, 2012 by Jim Walker

In one of the weirder cruise stories I have read in a time, Carnival Cruise Lines kicked off a passenger scheduled to speak on a "low carb diet" cruise on suspicion that he was going to explode dynamite or release Legionnaires virus on the ship.

The bizarre case involves a neurosurgeon from Tennessee who, ironically enough, is named Dr. Kruse (I'm not making this up). Jack Kruse is a popular diet guru / motivational speaker and lost some 130 lbs himself.  He was suppose to be one of the speakers on a diet cruise aboard an the Magic cruise ship operated by Carnival.   

But instead of sailing last Sunday afternoon out of Galveston, Dr. Kruse found his cabin being searched Dr. Jack Kruse - Diet - Motivationand being interrogated by Galveston police, Homeland Security, the FBI and the U.S. Coast Guard.  When it was all over, Carnival security removed his luggage from the ship and escorted him to the now empty pier.  He had to fetch a taxi and pay for an unanticipated flight back home. 

It turns out that Dr. Kruse has some mischievous enemies on Twitter.  A twitter user named @shitkrusesays (now deleted) tweeted: "Security confiscated dynamite. talk won't be as explosive as at PaleoFx. still have vial of Legionnaires for epic biohack"

Dr. Kruse had no connection to that Twitter account, but that did not stop the police from searching his his computers and turning his cabin upside down.

In addition, Carnival was contacted by a caller named "Lance" who informed them a doctor aboard the Carnival Magic was planning a viral bio-hack.

Dr. Kruse says that eventually the FBI, Homeland Security and the Coast Guard were convinced that the incident was a hoax, but the Captain of the cruise ship exercised his discretion to send Dr. Kruse from the ship.

The following day Carnival contacted Dr. Kruse and offered to fly him to Montego Bay to meet up with the cruise he missed. The doctor declined the offer.  The captain of the ship also sent a letter to the pssengers explaining the situation (below).

Meanwhile, the FBI is supposedly investigating who was behind the malicious tweets from @shitkrusesays.

Perhaps Carnival was a little jumpy after the news last week that al Qaeda had considered seizing a cruise ship and terrorizing the passengers.  But Dr. Kruse's web site hardly looks like a front for an al Qaeda terrorist.

The original post includes a video clip of a local news piece about the incident.

Offline Lilou

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #58 on: May 09, 2012, 03:31:43 AM »
Well this is just bizarre. Apparently Dr. Kruse was the target of a "cyber attack" that lead to the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, etc. kicking him off the "Low Carb Cruise" he was scheduled to speak at.

That is totally bizarre!  He must have some serious enemies.  It will be interesting to see if they find out who is behind it, but somehow, I think they will never be caught. 
Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet has free access to the sum of all human knowledge!    Jimmy Wales, founder of wikipedia

Offline SeekinTruth

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Re: Dr. Jack Kruse - Neurosurgeon
« Reply #59 on: May 09, 2012, 08:22:03 AM »
Well this is just bizarre. Apparently Dr. Kruse was the target of a "cyber attack" that lead to the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, etc. kicking him off the "Low Carb Cruise" he was scheduled to speak at.

That is totally bizarre!  He must have some serious enemies.  It will be interesting to see if they find out who is behind it, but somehow, I think they will never be caught. 

Bizarre, indeed. So gotta wonder just who those serious enemies might be? Just goes to show once again that whoever speaks any kind of "dangerous" truths, WILL be attacked. I too suspect that whoever is behind the whole episode will never be caught -- unlike bogus underwear bombers et al....
"All there is is Lessons." "Knowledge Protects, Ignorance Endangers." - Cassiopaeans

I can think of this network-group as a second, adopted family. I can think of Laura and Ark as the "parents" of this rather large family with all our amusing foibles. Occasionally there will be a "falling out;" a certain member may leave the family. But life goes on... and we all continue learning our lessons.

All for One & One for All. Together we stand, divided we fall.