Author Topic: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy  (Read 38103 times)

Online Gawan

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #180 on: March 28, 2012, 11:19:37 AM »
One side effect I note is with cold showering that my hands on the surface got more rough/dry and a bit flaky.
"When something goes wrong, take it as an adventure." Laura

Offline RedFox

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #181 on: March 28, 2012, 01:28:06 PM »
One side effect I note is with cold showering that my hands on the surface got more rough/dry and a bit flaky.

Having started them again I've noticed this too (not just my hands). It could be a detox reaction/the liver needing support and/or lack of omega 3.
"there are things and aims and goals available to us, that we do not dream of even in our most courageous dreams."
I mean personal goals here. Often we are afraid to set an aim for ourselves because, in the moment, we cannot
imagine a way to reach it. I think that is a mistake. Let us set goals for ourselves, and no matter how ambitious they are, let us trust that sooner or later, if we persevere, the path itself will emerge.

Ark - Febuary 2012

Offline LQB

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #182 on: March 28, 2012, 01:33:55 PM »
I think getting a cyrotherapy business up and running is doable too! Right now I am almost done getting most of the information needed to get things moving with Milleniumice. A number of things have to be in place though for this kind of business to be viable though, and I am working on distilling the information down to a couple of pages that I send to those who are interested. Then after we know what's really involved, from all (or most) angles, we'll be able to see better who can do what and where and maybe pool our resources where we can.

What has helped immeasurably is speaking with the owner of one cryotherapy business who Anart put me in touch with. So we will be learning from this business lady's successes and her advice will be followed. I spoke to her today and it seems like she's pretty savvy, so I don't think we'll be reinventing the wheel too much. At the same time, we may have some ideas of our own that we can add to the mix - cryotherapy may be another good entryway for disseminating knowledge of other subjects as Ailén has recently mentioned...

Incognito, I didn't receive your email, but I'll send you the summary once its done. Thanks.

Hi Ennio,

I found a cryo company in my own backyard here in Tenn. They do about all industrial cryo aps except medical. I talked with the CEO there and he is interested in joining the fray if the medical aps are expanding (_http://www.ustankcryo.com/home.html). So add me to the list for info and I'll pass what is appropriate on to him. You can also add me to the list of interested investors. Thanks!   :)
The only thing that seems to offer a way out is simply to observe the phenomena and compare the perceptions with a lot of other folks and try to narrow down the "constant" that is present in all of them.  In this way, we can have a closer idea of what the Third Man REALLY is, and what he is REALLY doing, and what then, should be our best response.  And, of course, "observing phenomena" means, in its most literal sense, to gain and gather knowledge of every form and sort so that one has a sufficient database from which to draw conclusions about observations of one's environment.

                                                                                                                                                                                 Laura Knight-Jadczyk

Offline Gertrudes

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #183 on: March 28, 2012, 04:56:05 PM »
Jut an update: I've been doing the cold showers daily for slightly more then a week. For the first 3 days I began with warmish water and gradually lowered the temperature until reaching almost cold. On the 4th day I finally reached full cold....Boy, was that an adventure!!
I don't think I've ever sang (read: Scream) so loud in the shower. At 6am I probably woke up the neighbours.
At the end of it I had a laugh attack, probably due to all the chemicals being released.

Well, on day 5, although I was scared of repeating the experience, it was easier. No extreme shock, no howling, no jumping in the shower. Since then I have been starting at warm, almost cold water, gradually decreasing the temperature until finishing in cold. Everyday I stay under pure cold water for a bit longer, even washing my hair, something that was completely unthinkable before.

I have to admit that although I still go through a few seconds of dreading the cold water every morning after waking up, I do enjoy the experience in the end. It leaves me energized, my skin has been looking very good, and even my hair.
I haven't been warming up as fast as a few members have reported, my experience is a bit more similar to the one from Ailén and Redfox. It does take me a while to warm back up, and I've been relying on hot tea to help. Ailén's latest account of how she has been noticing gradual improvements in her ability to tolerate cold was very motivating for me. I do notice that it is much easier for me to stay under the cold water, and if that is so, I imagine that eventually I will also start warming up faster.

Quote
http://jackkruse.com/the-quilthow-to-beat-agin/

Stem Cell depots.  This one, I bet, will move up as I age. I think what we are learning now is nothing short of amazing. As autophagy and apoptosis take out cells as they age, get infected with vectors, eliminated by ROS, ALEs, AGEs, and many other things, they get replaced with new cells that are not differentiated as yet that are hiding in our stroma as “soldiers in waiting.” The real issue is we do not appear to have an unlimited supply of them[/b]. Science now is challenging that assertion and I hope they are right, because if they are, we all might start living a long time.

The key to this levee is time and context. My theory holds that if you deplete your depot too early in life, your lifespan is shortened tremendously. In fact, I will be less tactful: If you abuse your body from ages 0-40, I think it has greater effects than if you abuse your body from 40-80. The reason is simple: The less we need to replace early in life allows us to have many more as we age when the effects of time and cellular damage accumulate. This is why the major diseases in humans all get more common as we age. We no longer have the reserves we once had.  If science proves that we can go back and create pluripotential cells and reengineer our stem cell depot then this risk certainly lessens. Right now this option does not exist. Damaging your depot includes poor dietary choices, trauma, cellular and emotional stress, and endurance exercise. We need to protect our stem cells at every age but we tend to lose most of them when we are young because we do not employ a levee strategy until we get to the back half of life.

Very interesting Psyche. The excerpt that I've underlined really caught my eye and made me think of how traditional Chinese philosophy sees energy and the human body. As far as I'm aware, and if I am correct, they divide ones' energy under three types: Jing, Chi and Shen. Here is something I wrote a while back on Jing:

Quote
Jing is translated as Essence and it is a most precious substance that should be well guarded, not wasted.
In Chinese philosophy there is pre natal Jing and post natal Jing. Pre natal Jing nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. It determines our basic constitution, vitality and strength. It is given as a set amount, onto which nothing can be added but it can be taken. In other words, we can't add more pre natal Jing but we can waste it. It is therefore important to conserve it and use it slowly. Achieving balance in all areas of life would be the best way to conserve Jing. A life of stress and excesses will waste pre natal Jing.
Certain forms of exercise and breathing methods such as in Qi Qong and Tai Chi would help conserve Jing.
Post natal Jing is developed after birth. As the child starts nourishing him/herself from food, drink, and air, the lungs, spleen and stomach will start working to extract Chi from the given substances. This constitutes post natal Jing. It is therefore important to keep cultivating Jing with a balanced diet and proper breathing and exercise.

Offline Incognito

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #184 on: March 28, 2012, 05:13:25 PM »

Incognito, I didn't receive your email, but I'll send you the summary once its done. Thanks.

Looking forward to reading the summary. Don't know what happened with the email.

Offline Endymion

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #185 on: March 28, 2012, 07:05:24 PM »
An update on my experience with cold showers. About three days ago I noticed a sudden change in my attitude and apprehension about the cold shower in the morning. My body just jumped right in although I've a little way to go to catch up mentally. Seems that my body knows what it wants much better than my mind does! In my mind when I get up in the morning there is still a little apprehension about the cold shower, even though I know how good it makes me feel.

And when I'm falling asleep at night I'm already thinking of the cold shower in the morning. Also, over the past three days I've found myself staying in for much longer – about 15 minutes – and moving much more slowly while under the water so that different parts of my body are exposed to the cold water for much longer than they would be if I kept moving about. I breathe deeply and powerfully and I aim to have my body a nice pink colour when I get out.

The first time I stayed under for 15 minutes it took about an hour afterwards to warm up properly. That was three days ago, but this morning I warmed up much faster. Daily exposure to cold really does adapt the body. My energy levels have increased, and my sleep has become deeper and more concentrated, thus I'm sleeping for less time but waking feeling that I've still had enough sleep.

RedFox mentioned something really interesting recently: taking a cold shower for as long as possible without self pity. A cold shower is a great place to observe self-pity, and to try to experience and observe the sensation of cold without all the negative mental chatter that usually accompanies it. Anart said to me a while ago that self-pity had quite the hold one me, so I'm using the cold shower opportunity as a way to observe it in myself, and try to get beyond the self-pity.

A cold shower seems to have very positive mental effects as well as its beneficial physical effects.

One side effect I note is with cold showering that my hands on the surface got more rough/dry and a bit flaky.

Having started them again I've noticed this too (not just my hands). It could be a detox reaction/the liver needing support and/or lack of omega 3.

I've noticed the same thing, especially since staying under the cold shower for a longer time. I'm taking about 5 grams of omega 3 daily, and zinc for my skin. I think I'll start taking milk thistle again to support my liver.
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Laura Knight-Jadczyk

Online Gawan

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #186 on: March 28, 2012, 09:26:50 PM »
I don't think I've ever sang (read: Scream) so loud in the shower. At 6am I probably woke up the neighbours.
At the end of it I had a laugh attack, probably due to all the chemicals being released.

Lol. I had a similar experience today, though I don't sing I'm babbling now more under the shower and singing has at least something to do with breathing, so was then my last thought. My other 'theory' was then, maybe that's the reason why people sing under the shower, but well not that many take a cold shower I think. ;)

And when I'm falling asleep at night I'm already thinking of the cold shower in the morning. Also, over the past three days I've found myself staying in for much longer – about 15 minutes – and moving much more slowly while under the water so that different parts of my body are exposed to the cold water for much longer than they would be if I kept moving about. I breathe deeply and powerfully and I aim to have my body a nice pink colour when I get out.

Same here, it is much less 'annoying' than in the beginning and I enjoy it more and more.

One side effect I note is with cold showering that my hands on the surface got more rough/dry and a bit flaky.

Having started them again I've noticed this too (not just my hands). It could be a detox reaction/the liver needing support and/or lack of omega 3.

Good point as soon as I have money again I go for some fish oil capsules, nonetheless I'm eating also much more fish at the moment.



"When something goes wrong, take it as an adventure." Laura

Online Gaby

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #187 on: March 28, 2012, 10:12:15 PM »
Here are some highlights of Dr. Kruse's last post on thermogenesis. It is clearer bit than the last one even though still a bit dense. But it is still interesting to read all the changes going in your body that explains the beneficial changes of cold adaptation AND a paleo diet. He describes the hormonal cycle of a warm adapted person and its relation to leptin and then he also explains the rationale of cold adapting.

Quote
Epigenetics major signal transducer is found in the cellular signaling found in our cell membranes that interact with the environment and our inner hormones that signal our epigenetic switches that sit on our genes inside the nucleus. Since it is clear that our cold adapted pathways use sensory afferents to signal to open the Ancient Pathway, I think it is time we just have a blog in the CT series that discusses what a normal 24 hour day is like in a human circadian biology.

[...]

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN STEP 20 [the surge of prolactin] IS BROKEN IN MODERN HUMANS?

This commonly happens in diabetics, but it is now becoming a very common finding in modern humans because of the excessive use of technology after sunset. These artificial lights also tend to be quite bright and completely un-yoke the normal circadian signals from the hormone response. Light after sunset reduces the prolactin surge we normally see in humans. When we see chronic lowered prolactin surges we also see lower growth hormone secretion during the anabolic phases of sleep. Lowered chronic GH secretion directly affects cardiac and skeletal muscle function because the process of autophagy is made less efficient as our life continues. Lowered GH and the sex steroid hormones at sleep lead to loss of cardiac function. This is why heart failure is strongly associated with low IGF-1 and sex steroid hormone levels. When growth hormone is not released in normal amounts, it also decreases our lean muscle mass and increases our fat percentage in all our organs and in our body. This leads to slowly declining organ dysfunction and poor body composition. We can measure this process clinically by looking for falling DHEA and GH levels levels as we age.

WHAT HAPPENS IN NORMAL AGING IN STEP 21 [the large circadian prolactin surge]?

Aging is among the most common features found in studies on modern humans when DHEA and GH craters on hormone panels. The loss of the prolactin surge is especially prominent in post menopausal women. Most women begin to suffer from falling DHEA and GH levels around age 35-40 while they are still in peri-menopause. The higher their HS-CRP levels, the faster they enter peri-menopause and the quicker they enter menopause. They also age faster on a cellular level because thei circadian chemical clocks are sped up. As a consequence, their telomeres shorten faster as well. Women have higher levels of leptin for child bearing, so they are more prone to leptin resistant issues then men. Leptin is sexually dimorphic hormone. This helps explain why older women struggle with cognitive haze, loss of body composition, poor sleep, and increased levels of heart disease after menopause. Many physicians think the losses they suffer are due to the loss of estrogen from ovarian failure, but the loss of growth hormone and progesterone production are far more significant on their physiology. Progesterone is the off switch to anything that is pro growth. Modern women are usually estrogen dominant even after menopause because of mismatches in circadian biology. Cognitive loss is especially common in post menopausal women. They also lose on average 1% of their bone mineral density per year from menopause in large part due to the loss of progesterone, not estrogen. Loss of progesterone also corresponds to poor sleep in these women too. Replacing progesterone in women has a major affect on their sleep and bone stock. It also dramatically improves their memories and cognitive function as well.

SNACKING AFTER DINNER: EFFECT ON CIRCADIAN CYCLES:

If you choose to eat within 4 hours of sleep you will never see the prolactin surge you need, because any spike in insulin turns off this critical sleep time release that corresponds to the cellular maximums of the autophagic process for humans. Something also happens. Agouti, the incretin gut hormone also rises in the blood to higher than normal levels to block leptin from entering the brain. Diurnal cycles for agouti are coupled to NPY and have major affects on leptin. Agouti is a gene product that normally increases the release of leptin from fat cells at night to signal the brain of what the energy status is of the body. This is great when it is working well. When it is elevated due to heavy carbohydrate use in our diet it creates a massive problem. This is why late night carbohydrate snacking is a real bad thing to do.

It appears 12-3 AM are the critical hours at night are where the remnants of mammalian hibernation lies for our species. These are the anabolic times for sleep when we are re building our proteins and recycling our cellular contents. They are three of the most important hours in all human biology. If you miss them, you can bet you have several neolithic diseases for sure. Why you ask? If these three hours are not reached enough during our sleep cycle, autophagy is never optimized and cellular repair does not occur for our cells. This means we are using old broken down parts in our cells as the next day arrives at 6AM and cortisol rises again to wake us up.

[...]

PROLACTIN, DOC?

You must be asking, why is this prolactin hormone so important in a warm adapted human? Prolactin is not just a hormone that secretes human milk. That is the best known action of prolactin, but not the most important. Immediately after prolactin is released during sleep, another signal is sent to the anterior pituitary to release the largest amount of Growth Hormone as we sleep (GH). GH is stimulated only during autophagic sleep cycles in stage 3 and 4…..to increase protein synthesis for muscle growth……all while you’re dissipating heat via the uncoupling proteins. This is where the major release of GH occurs in humans post puberty when they are warm adapted. 99.9% reading this blog are warm adapted. If you chose to become cold adapted the GH story radically changes, as laid out in CT-6 [his last blog post]

The implications here are huge for the warm adapted human, if this prolactin surge is not adequate to allow us to enter the anabolic stages of sleep. Prolactin surge is diminished by both artificial light at night and by foods that stimulate NPY, (namely carbs and protein) when they are eaten in fall and winter when biology says they should not be available.

If you are leptin resistant for any reason, have sleep apnea, you will always have an altered body composition because of a low GH level and an altered sex steroid profiles on testing. The reason is because DHEA is the immediate precursor for those hormones and is always low in people with bad sleep efficiency. Most VLCers who are warm adapted face this very problem today. VLC diet is best used in the cold adapted mammal and not the modern warm adapted lifestyle. In essence, this diet is a mismatch for our modern lifestyle. This is why so many bloggers think ketosis is a dirty word for performance and body composition.

This all implies as you age you will have higher body fat %, lower muscle mass %, if autophagy is not optimized by great sleep. This is precisely what we see today in most modern humans as they age. Invariably, their sleep cycles and sleep durations are poor and decreased from their childhood levels. As they age, there is a chronic insidious erosion of circadian biology by decisions made by modern humans over and over again.

WHAT ABOUT TEMPERATURE VARIATIONS IN WARM ADAPTED HUMANS?

Where does temperature enter the picture? In warm-blooded animals, homeotherms such as humans, can change their metabolism in order to keep their heat production equal to the heat loss. Such animals have a temperature control system and thereby maintain a rather constant core temperature. Warm-blooded animals live with the advantage of an unchanged cell activity and temperature in their core. However, the human core temperature falls during the estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle (pro-growth) and during sleep (circadian rhythm by melatonin).

The lowest temperature of the day for modern humans is usually between 2 AM and 6 AM. The temperature cycle is part of the normal circadian periodicity. Our biological clock seems to be synchronized with the rotation of the globe daily. Meal composition and timing, light cycles and temperature plays a role in altering normal cycles and autophagic optimization.
Ovulation releases a sharp rise in morning temperature with its estrogen surge. Progesterone effects seem to explain the higher temperature in the last phase of the menstrual cycle where it calms the the pro growth effects of estrogen. In post menopausal women, this balance is usually not ideal, and it leads to many menopausal complaints these women face today.

The reduced temperature induced by melatonin in sleep is needed for Central Nervous System autophagic repair, for another, less well known reason. The lowered temperature sets the stage for the biologic quantum effects to be optimal on our neurons microtubules that facilitate learning and neuronal spouting that occur brain wide.

This is why if you don’t sleep well you feel badly the next AM, and your mental performance suffers the next few days on cognitive tasks. Research also shows your learning is severely impaired because of lowered BDNF and changes in diurnal cortisol due to the sleep deficit. This is why we monitor truck drivers and airline pilots sleep and wake cycles by law!

Moreover, in hospitalized ICU patients or the elderly when this occurs, it sets the stage for the appearance of acute onset delirium. This is exacerbated when they also have a simultaneous cytokine storm from sepsis or obesity. We see this often in hospitalized patients who can not sleep well in ICU’s. Acute delirium states very much look the same as chronic sleep deprivation patients we see clinically as well. Inducing cold, using progesterone and using hypnotics helps manage these conditions. I mentioned this in my hour long Paleo fx talk last week.

Read this link in 3/11/2012 NYT: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/27/really-the-claim-your-body-clock-can-determine-when-you-get-sick/

[...]

VIP regulates the circadian rhythm in humans and most mammals. VIP is a gut hormone and is found in our taste receptors too! So if we taste sweetness from carbs in our diet when its warm and they are growing in the environment, our brain is expecting us to be in a warm season…….not a cold one. So sweet means warm not cold to the brain. If you mismatch that and eat carbs at the wrong seasonal time you create inflammation in the brain and it throws off our chemical clocks in our cells and ages us faster. That means our telomeres get shorter. This is not good.

[...]

The circadian clock not only can generate its own rhythms but can also be entrained by the environmental light-dark (LD) cycle. Multiple single cell circadian oscillators that are present in the clock can, when synchronized, generate coordinated circadian outputs which ultimately regulate the overt rhythms.

VIP is a gut polypeptide, has been identified as one of the main neurotransmitters of SCN [suprachiasmatic nucleus, the nervous system responsible for most circadian behavior can be localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)] neurons and participates in SCN function. These SCN neurons are retino-recipient and are found in the core of the SCN. They are activated by light, and exogenous application of VIP can reset the circadian clock in a manner similar to that of light application, both in vitro and in vivo. It is estimated that 9%–24 % of SCN neurons express VIP.

[...]

One of the main chemical constituents of SCN neurons is vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Such neurons are retino-recipient and activated by light. Exogenous application of VIP resets the SCN circadian clock in a light-like manner both in vivo and in vitro. These resetting actions appear to be mediated through the VPAC2 receptor (a type of receptor for VIP). Unexpectedly, genetically ablating expression of the VPAC2 receptor renders the circadian clock arrhythmic at the molecular, neurophysiological and behavioral levels. These findings indicate that this intrinsic neuropeptide acting through the VPAC2 receptor participates in both resetting to light and maintenance of ongoing rhythmicity of the SCN.

[...]

VIP (along with GRP and AVP) show circadian variations in the level of mRNA in constant contact with environmental conditions from our tongue and our gut. When light becomes long lasting in summer, NPY dominates the SCN in mammals……when light becomes low and temperature falls to 50-55 degrees constantly at our surface cold receptors, and eNOS rises and blocks all photic [penetrated by or receiving ligh] input to SCN and circadian rhythms are maintained by a new program. Alpha MSH [melanocyte-stimulating hormone] induces and potentiates that seasonal change within the hypothalamus as laid out in CT-6 blog.

{More info here: http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,26988.msg330007.html#msg330007 and http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,27112.msg329806.html#msg329806}

THE MORAL: So the brain is wired for foods when they grow naturally, not when we “feel or think” we can/should eat them regardless of their availability in modern times.

Leptin sensitivity directly regulates VIP production. VIP regulates the circadian rhythm and entrains the SCN to light. When it is cold, leptin is released from fat cells in large amounts, and we begin to use eNOS to entrain our SCN to cold cycles and we should avoid carbs like the plague then. Remember from CT-6, cold empties fat cells like a screaming fire would empties a crowded cinema. In cold, the pituitary-hypothalamic portal is involved in the production of lots of alpha MSH and ACTH. When MSH rises, you are allowing the brain to control everything to get you to optimal. This should make it abundantly clear that cold and warm adapted mammals are not sharing the same circadian biology. Cold selects for supreme LS and superior hormone optimization as laid out in the CT 6 blog.

[...]

THE COLD LINK: WHY CT SIMPLY ROCKS

Cold temperatures sensitize us to leptin by causing it to be released from fat cells over time leading to a lower level in the blood chronically. Low temperatures also cause us to increase our RER, while eating a low calorie diet and still maintaining our lean skeletal muscle mass. These findings show that during very low-calorie diets, and low temperatures , are a stimulant of a FAS [fatty acid synthetase] inhibitor, like leptin, and would raise malonyl-CoA levels, while decreasing the expression of NPY and AgRP. Clinically this results in sustained satiation for longer periods of time with less food. Remember that NPY is also the neuropeptide that is high in the SCN during high light levels when carbohydrates are highest. This peptide is directly regulated by leptin function. So if one is leptin resistant it appears to the SCN that winter has become summer. This is a circadian mismatch and a source of inflammation in the brain. When cold comes and light drops eNOS is induced and shuts the SCN off to photic entrainment of the circadian clock. The reason for this is not only annual seasonality, but for periodic ice ages mammals have faced on earth, and appears to be our primordial situation for life.

This is clearly a survival mechanism that is hardwired into all mammals by evolution, but the ancient pathway has another more important role that we have failed to uncover yet. (FACTOR X)

The environment required for the cold pathway expression is under cold, low light, and low calorie conditions. All must all be met at once. This is precisely what all cold adapted eutherian mammals are ideally adapted to. These are modern human ancestors, and their biochemistry is foundational to our current paleolithic Ferrari engines. Many believe this pathway represents a starvation response (not), but its real biologic value is of even more interesting. We will talk about this later this year.

This temperature gradient gradually reduces all hunger, pain, thirst, and facilitate sleep in humans and all mammals. These functions were all selected for by evolution via natural selection pressures faced by eutherian mammalian evolution. Moreover, these effects of leptin cause specific epigenetic modification effects on the other hypothalamic hormones or peptides derived from POMC [pro-opiomelanocortin] protein cleavage. Those changes are linked via the biology of the POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus. Leptin and its receptor is especially sensitive to changes in temperature and to the light cycles that humans and all mammals face. Leptin is intimately tied to hunger, it is linked to thyroid function and directly tied to fat metabolism in all mammals. [...]

EVERYONE REUNITE FOR SLEEP AND IMMUNITY: In the warm adapted human

Simultaneously, while sleep is rebuilding our cellular terroir (think levee one), the immune system is also undergoing autophagic repair as well. That is another reason why the temperature has to fall in our bodies. Usually, temperature rises and this causes immune function to rise and more easily activate in response and duration in fever, stress and infections. This activation depletes our immune system of its reserves during high light waking hours. Dropping our temperature as we sleep allows us to repair it. During sleep this is when the body re-tools our immunity to function optimally the next day. What controls this entire orchestra of hormonal regulation? Its all leptin mediated……..and the brain is the master receptive organ to its function.

Sleep is a time for recycling and rebuilding to get us ready for the next day. It is also a time when our immune system is retooled to fight the battle the next day.
[...]

It has now been shown that sleep increases telomere lengths on leukocytes in humans. Sleep has also been theorized to effectively combat the accumulation of free radicals in the brain, by increasing the efficiency of endogeneous antioxidant mechanisms. These mechanisms are mediated by the hormone DHEA which is the major antioxident in the brain and correlates directly with effective sleep by lowering IL-6 levels. Progesterone is another critical hormone for brain homeostasis and learning as well. Sleep is vital to mammals, but it is supremely vital to humans, because they have shrunk the benefits of hibernation into 2 short critical hours of their sleep cycle because of the massive growth of their brains extinguished the need to sleep through the winter months.

Since man can directly control his environment, therefore, being awake during winter was naturally selected for in his direct ancestors before the primates species because they have the same adaptations. The programs that control our fat mass (leptin) however still remain tied to our ability to sleep well.

[...]

SLEEP IMPLICATIONS:

A University of California, San Diego psychiatry study of more than one million adults found that people who live the longest self-report sleeping for six to seven hours each night. Another study of sleep duration and mortality risk in women showed similar results. Researchers at the University of Warwick and University College London have found that lack of sleep can more than double the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, but that too much sleep can also be associated with a doubling of the risk of death, though not primarily from cardiovascular disease. Professor Francesco Cappuccio said, “Short sleep has been shown to be a risk factor for weight gain, hypertension, and Type 2 diabetes, sometimes leading to mortality.

These all tie to a failure of autophagy in sleep stages 3 and 4 mentioned above. Here, we see why poor sleep links to sleep apnea and the neolithic diseases that are associated with sleep apnea. Growth Hormone is released in pulsatile fashion from 12-3 AM during restorative sleep cycles 3 & 4, and this hormone facilitates autophagy and recycling of proteins. In essence GH keeps us younger and in great shape when we sleep like a rockstar. The problem is modern man does not sleep well because of his brain’s creations. (Modern Technology)

The metabolic phase during sleep at this time is anabolic which favors repair; anabolic hormones such as growth hormones (as mentioned above) are secreted preferentially during sleep. If things are working well things get repaired at night as we sleep, and if sleep is poor repair either absent or sub optimal. When this occurs chronically stem cells are used to replace cells instead of using cellular recycling processes that are normally used. Sleep is vital for all our organs rebuilding and retooling.

[...]

Using the cold adapted pathway described in CT 6, is the best way to protect from all circadian erosions, considering we no longer hibernate and have to rely on the two hours of anabolic sleep we get as a replacement. Cold lowers all inflammatory cytokines across the board.

In warm adapted humans, it becomes clear that inflammation is the single most destructive obstacle to human health. This implies that understanding how to control leptin becomes paramount for the warm adapted human.

[...]

Temperature and light have massive biological effects on our biochemistry. We need to be aware of this.
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Online voyageur

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #188 on: March 28, 2012, 10:53:41 PM »
Thanks Psyche, this is really interesting. One of the things i've thought about was the affects for Northern (or conversely Southern) people as opposed to central people in correlation with light. For instance, the winter produces in our norther hemisphere often as little as 5 -7 hours of light and in the mid summer up to 18 hours. Central people are pretty steady at lets say 12 hours year round, so their inner clocks and systems are fairly regulated and foods do not need to be so variable. What is described as the hot/cold, carbs/fat makes sense for Northern/Southern people as well as the timing. It sure feels a disadvantage in these lower/upper latitudes when dealing with our internal systems, being so out of whack due to things like work schedules and lights waning and waxing extremes. Keeping a close eye on what you've posted sure could help a lot of people.

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Offline Bo

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #189 on: March 28, 2012, 11:54:46 PM »
Here is a small summary of some patients with before and after results, rest can be read here for those interested > (_http://lifeofmillennium.com/pdf/Cryo_ACT_Studies_002.pdf)

1. The influence of whole body cryotherapy on mental health
Treatments: First time?
Result: Immediately after passing the cryogenic chamber, apart from the well known analgetic effect, we detect changes in patients' mental state such as improvement of mood, deep relaxation, freshening up, consolation, euphoria. This unusual state lasts for a long time after ending the cycle of cryotherapy.

2. BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF THE WHOLE-BODY CRYOTHERAPY ON SPORT HAEMOLYSIS
Treatments: five sessions on alternate days once daily for one week.
Results: WBC reduces sports haemolysis, as judged from MSCV and haptoglobin data, supported from other haematological values, as well as the absence of mean corpuscolar volume and reticulocytes increase.

3. Whole-body cryotherapy in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. A prospective study
Treatments: Twice a day.
Results: whole-body cryotherapy is an effective option in the concept of treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The relief of pain allows an intensification of physiotherapy. A significant reduction of pain over a period of 2 months could be shown.

4. Whole-body cryotherapy in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid diseases--pilot study
Treatments: 2,5 minutes per week , per day??? Unknown.
Results: The pain reduction lasts about 90 minutes. The initial pain level decreases during the whole time of treatment, no significant improvement, though, can be shown from the middle to the end of the four-weeks treatment. According to the results of
our study, there is evidence that the whole-body cold therapy generates important short-term effects and somewhat weaker effects over the treatment period as a whole.

5. Whole-body cryotherapy as adjunct treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders
Treatments: 15 sessions (2-3 min, from -160 degrees C to -110 degrees C).
Results: The Hamilton's depression rating scale (HDRS) and Hamilton's anxiety rating scale (HARS) were used as the outcome measures. RESULTS: After three weeks, a decrease of at least 50% from the baseline HDRS-17 scores in 34.6% of the study group and 2.9% of the control group and a decrease of at least 50% from the baseline HARS score in 46.2% of the study group and in none of the control group were noted. CONCLUSIONS: These findings, despite such limitations as a small sample size, suggest a possible role for WBCT as a short-term adjuvant treatment for mood and anxiety disorders.

6. Evaluation of effectiveness of whole-body cryotherapy in patients with tinnitus
Total Patients 120
Treatments: 10 procedures in two cycles with the weekend break. They were in cryochamber in temperature of -110 degrees C for 3 minutes. After cryotherapy they used kinesitherapy for 45 minutes.
Results:  The results indicates complete elimination of tinnitus in 4 patients, decrease in their intensity in 47 patients, maintenance of the ailment on the same level in 13 people and slightly increase of tinnitus in 16 patients. In audiometry we could observe in I group changes in frequency of tinnitus in 138 ears and changes in intensity of tinnitus in 91 ears. After treatment decrease of average hearing loss and average hearing damage were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of tinnitus may be effective by using whole-body cryotherapy.


7. Lung function after acute and repeated exposures to extremely cold air (-110 degrees C) during whole-body cryotherapy
total patients: Twenty-five healthy(what is their definition of healthy?) , non-smoking subjects participated in the study.
Treatments: 2 min three times per week for 12 weeks.
Results: In conclusion, the WBC induced minor bronchoconstriction in healthy humans instead of proposed bronchodilatation. The WBC seems not to be harmful for lung function, but should be used with caution in susceptible individuals.

8. Thermal sensation and comfort in women exposed repeatedly to whole-body cryotherapy and winter swimming in ice-cold water.
Total patients: Twenty women similar in body mass index, age, physical activity, and use of hormonal contraception were pairwise randomized either to the WBC group or the WS group.
Treatments: The duration of each WBC exposure was 2 min, which was repeated three times per week for 3 months (13 weeks). Similar exposure frequency was used for the WS group, but each exposure lasted 20 s in outdoor conditions
Results: repeated exposures to WBC and WS in healthy women were mostly well tolerated and comfortable. The results indicate that during repeated severe whole-body cold stress of short duration, thermal sensation and comfort become habituated during the first exposures.

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Offline Nicolas

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #190 on: March 29, 2012, 04:47:22 AM »

6. Evaluation of effectiveness of whole-body cryotherapy in patients with tinnitus
Total Patients 120
Treatments: 10 procedures in two cycles with the weekend break. They were in cryochamber in temperature of -110 degrees C for 3 minutes. After cryotherapy they used kinesitherapy for 45 minutes.
Results:  The results indicates complete elimination of tinnitus in 4 patients, decrease in their intensity in 47 patients, maintenance of the ailment on the same level in 13 people and slightly increase of tinnitus in 16 patients. In audiometry we could observe in I group changes in frequency of tinnitus in 138 ears and changes in intensity of tinnitus in 91 ears. After treatment decrease of average hearing loss and average hearing damage were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of tinnitus may be effective by using whole-body cryotherapy.


Thanks Bo!

This effect on Tinnitus has peaked my interest to give whole-body cryotherapy a try since I suffer with this constant noise in my ears.

There is a CryoStudio in my city that I may check into.
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Offline Prodigal Son

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #191 on: March 29, 2012, 11:04:02 AM »
Having spent some time washing my face and hair in cold water (approx 12C), I progressed to a cold bath, and have just completed a week of this.  Initially I started with the water almost straight from the cold tap, a temperature of 16.5C and sat in it with water up to and covering my groin, lying down was OK too, no shivering and skin colour normal, no need for recovery time. 

On the third day I decided to go completely cold water (9.5C – what Kruse suggests for the face immersion exercise (10 – 12.5C)), and sat in the water up to and covering my groin; even with used pipe breathing, I lasted only a minute before I wimped out. 

On the fifth day I decided to do two sessions a day, the first an hour after eating breakfast, and the other in the evening, and increasing the time for each successive session.  The first minute seems to be the worst, with shuddering and then subsiding into shivering, and my submerged skin was pink. It took about an hour to get warm afterwards. 

Then I said to myself it’s time to conquer the fear and go for it.  I’ve now got to the stage of increasing the duration by five minutes in each subsequent session, using music as a distraction from looking at the time go by.  The recovery period to warm again seems to be increasing, currently at two plus hours.  Pre-bath, my groin skin temperature is 31.3C (measured using a digital meat thermometer), and post immersion, my skin temperature is 16.2C.  This suggests that in order to meet the skin temperature that Kruse talks about (10 – 12.5C), at some time ice will be required to lower the water temperature.  There is still some shivering, but the intensity is much less.  It does get easier as you go along, no longer any need for pipe breathing. 

My plan is to work up to 30 minutes (currently at 15 minutes) before immersing my torso and extending the time up to 45 minutes.  And, at some stage adding the ice.   :)
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Offline Don Genaro

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #192 on: March 29, 2012, 12:37:26 PM »

I haven't been warming up as fast as a few members have reported, my experience is a bit more similar to the one from Ailén and Redfox. It does take me a while to warm back up, and I've been relying on hot tea to help.

Gertrudes, I was checking out Jack Kruse's CT forum and your comment reminded me of this post where people were asking if hot showers etc. would have a negative effect on cold adaptation:

Quote
He was fine with people taking hot showers, warm baths, etc, just don't do it to warm up after a CT session.
I guess the meaning here is for the warming up to be natural and not artificially induced?

You can read the full thread here: _http://forum.jackkruse.com/showthread.php?187-Does-Exposure-to-Heat-UNDO-any-of-the-Cold-Adaptation-Goodness
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Online Renaissance

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #193 on: March 29, 2012, 05:21:40 PM »

I haven't been warming up as fast as a few members have reported, my experience is a bit more similar to the one from Ailén and Redfox. It does take me a while to warm back up, and I've been relying on hot tea to help.

Gertrudes, I was checking out Jack Kruse's CT forum and your comment reminded me of this post where people were asking if hot showers etc. would have a negative effect on cold adaptation:

Quote
He was fine with people taking hot showers, warm baths, etc, just don't do it to warm up after a CT session.
I guess the meaning here is for the warming up to be natural and not artificially induced?

You can read the full thread here: _http://forum.jackkruse.com/showthread.php?187-Does-Exposure-to-Heat-UNDO-any-of-the-Cold-Adaptation-Goodness

I've been wondering about this too, since I've also used tea to warm up a couple of times. I've seen Kruse recommend that you want to warm up naturally too but wasn't sure if the tea applied or not since that is relating to warming up your core, which I think may be different than artificially warming the skin.  I don't know for sure though and have only been doing it when I get more intense shivers.

The funny thing is that sometimes I'll shiver a bunch and sometimes hardly at all. I've been trying to do the showers or baths a couple of hours after I've eaten, that way I know I have some fuel for my body but it's not using energy to digest either. So far I haven'y figured out why I get really cold sometimes and other times I don't.

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Offline RedFox

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy
« Reply #194 on: March 29, 2012, 08:12:22 PM »
I just wanted to add (especially after reading the article above posted by Psyche) that I think my leg cramps where caused by carbs during/after the evening meal - specifically sweet carbs like berries and chocolate. This may well explain why I got such bad cramps so quickly after trying out cold showers - perhaps its the taste rather than the amount of carbs causing the problem (as described in the pathways above).
I've dropped down to almost zero carbs the last few days and the lingering feeling of cramp has started to subside. Still need to experiment to confirm this for sure though.

*edit to add*
I'm also wondering if sleeping late/eating sweet foods etc causes (brain) inflammation/messes up your bodies cycles/causes aging due to lack of cellular repair, perhaps it is also the reverse - if you are inflamed/have messed up hormone cycles/damaged cellular systems you are more likely to crave sweet foods and go to bed late?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2012, 08:23:12 PM by RedFox »
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