Author Topic: Do-it-yourself liposomal nutrients  (Read 32474 times)

Offline Laura

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Do-it-yourself liposomal nutrients
« on: January 13, 2013, 05:33:00 PM »
IMPORTANT NOTE: For more information about when Vitamin C could be contraindicated or needs to be taken in a specific way, please read the thread Hemochromatosis and Autoimmune Conditions, especially if you notice any worsening of your symptoms after Vitamin C intake.

Good news for those who hate needles!!!! 

http://www.lewrockwell.com/sardi/sardi144.html  where there are a lot of hyperlinks in the article.

Quote
Researchers Achieve Cancer-Killing Effect With Oral-Dose Vitamin C

by Bill Sardi

In an overlooked study first published in 2008, for the first time, using a special liposomal form of oral-dose vitamin C, researchers in Britain demonstrated it is possible to achieve cancer-killing blood concentrations of this vitamin without undesirable side effects.

Heretofore, National Institutes of Health Researchers claimed the maximal concentration of vitamin C that can be achieved following oral intake is not sufficient to produce a cancer-killing effect. Now British researchers demonstrate they were able to achieve blood concentrations of vitamin C that were twice what was incorrectly reported to be maximal, and in the range of what is known to be selectively toxic to tumor cells, yet not harmful to healthy cells.

Studies with various forms of cancer show a 30%-to-50% cancer cell-killing effect at the same blood concentration of vitamin C achieved in this study. For comparison, anti-cancer drugs are approved by the FDA if they achieve 50% tumor shrinkage.

Researchers Stephen Hickey and Hilary J. Roberts, long-time advocates of vitamin C therapy and authors of the book Ascorbate: The Science of Vitamin C, writing in the Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine, believe even higher concentration of vitamin C can be achieved, up to three times what was once mistakenly believed to be maximal, with measured, repeated oral doses.

It was Linus Pauling, the two-time Nobel Prize winner, who first employed intravenous vitamin C to prolong the lives of terminal cancer patients. This was reported in 1978.

A year later Mayo Clinic researchers then followed with a study of their own, which utilized oral-dose vitamin C, and errantly dispelled the notion of using vitamin C to treat cancer. However, oral doses cannot achieve the same high blood concentration that intravenous vitamin C can produce.

Only recently has it come to light that the dismissal of vitamin C for cancer therapy was based upon oral-dose vitamin C, and subsequent studies found intravenous vitamin C has the potential to be used in cancer therapy. Some small pilot studies appear to be encouraging with the use of intravenous vitamin C therapy. Cancer researchers have recently called for a reconsideration of intravenous vitamin C therapy.

According to researchers Hickey and Roberts, repeated doses, and use of a special liposomal form of vitamin C that is absorbed in the gut and then into the liver before it is released into the blood stream, are key to making oral vitamin C therapy effective. Another important factor is to limit the consumption of carbohydrates (refined sugar) which impairs oral absorption of this vitamin.

Dr. John Ely, emeritus professor at the University of Washington, has also shown that sugar depletes vitamin C from white blood cells and makes them sluggish. White blood cells are the very cells that attack tumor cells and destroy them.

The liposomal form of vitamin C employed in this study consists of 1-gram (1000 milligram) dose sachets of vitamin C powder encapsulated in lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), as supplied by Livon Laboratories of Henderson, Nevada, USA.

A British laboratory (Biolab, London) that has conducted thousands of vitamin C assays over a 10-year period, confirms that 20-gram and 36-gram doses of oral vitamin C, as utilized by researchers Hickey and Roberts, achieved far higher blood concentration than had ever been measured previously. Repeated dosing rather than massive single-dose vitamin C averts side effects such as diarrhea.

The cancer cell-killing effect of vitamin C is realized by the transient production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) within connective tissues (not in blood), which then destroys tumor cells, and subsequently turns to harmless water (H2O), ensuring non-toxic therapy.

Read the rest here: http://www.lewrockwell.com/sardi/sardi144.html
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 04:23:13 PM by Possibility of Being »
He who learns must suffer
And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget
Falls drop by drop upon the heart,
And in our own despair, against our will,
Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
Agamemnon, Aeschylus

Offline Laura

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2013, 05:48:46 PM »
_http://www.quantumbalancing.com/liposomalC.htm
Quote
Home-Made Liposomal Vitamin C (and Glutathione)

    Vitamin C is the most used supplement in the world. There is good reason for this as the science behind the many benefits of vitamin C is solid. Dr. Svent Gyorgi and Dr. Linus Pauling performed innumerable experiments proving that man, unlike most animals, is dependent upon vitamin C for a healthy existence. For decades we have relied upon various ascorbic formulas for our supplemental needs, but now a whole new vista opens up with Liposomal technology.

Increase Absorption Dramatically - Regular vitamin C is absorbed at approximately 19%, the balance remains in the gastrointestinal tract to attract water and loosen the bowels. Nanotechnology, liposomalized vitamin C is absorbed at 93%, measurable in the blood stream. A 390% increase in absorption! Get IV results with oral dosage!

    Heat one cup of distilled water in a ceramic coated or stainless steel pan on your stove (do not heat it in a microwave oven) until almost boiling.
    Pour the water into your blender and add three level tablespoons of lecithin and blend until all of the lecithin is totally dissolved in the water.
    In one cup of cold distilled water, dissolve one level tablespoon of ascorbic acid. Make sure it is totally dissolved, very important!
    Add the ascorbic acid mixture to the lecithin mixture and blend well.
    Pour the mixture into the ultrasonic cleaner and turn it on. Stir frequently.
    The cleaner will turn itself off about every two minutes or so. You continue to stir frequently and turn the cleaner back on until ALL of the foam is gone. Repeat: Continue to stir and turn the cleaner back on until ALL OF THE FOAM IS GONE!! This will take about 30 minutes or so. When done you will have a mix that is about the color of milk. There will be some settling but shouldn't be much, less than 5% of the mix or so.

    When done, pour mix into a reseal able GLASS jar and store in your refrigerator.

    Take one teaspoon full of mix once a day.

    You can experiment with this amount after you have taken it for awhile to see how it effects you.

    Take on an empty stomach and wait at least 15 minutes before eating anything.

    Many take it in the morning before breakfast.

    It is really sour tasting so many chase it with water to get the taste out of the mouth.


    Glutathione
    Method is exactly the same as above:
    3 level tablespoons soy lecithin
    1 tablespoon or 7 grams of glutathione powder
    Proceed exactly as above.

   
« Last Edit: January 15, 2013, 05:34:46 PM by Laura »
He who learns must suffer
And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget
Falls drop by drop upon the heart,
And in our own despair, against our will,
Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
Agamemnon, Aeschylus

Offline Gaby

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2013, 05:54:12 PM »
Quote
    Vitamin C
    3 level tablespoons of soy lecithin (45cc). Make sure it is GMO free and organic if possible.
    1 level tablespoon ascorbic acid powder (15cc)

    Dissolve the lecithin in 1 cup (240cc) warm, NOT HOT, water, preferably distilled. You can use cold water but it dissolves much faster if slightly warmed. If the water is hot, it will clump rather than dissolve.

    Dissolve the ascorbic acid in 1/2 cup warm water, preferably distilled.

    Pour both solutions together into a wide mouth mason jar or other container that can accommodate the stick blender.

    Blend until it forms a cloudy, homogeneous mixture in about 2 minutes.
    Refrigerate and you're done. You will have to calculate the dose you are taking by the amount of Vitamin C in the product you use. For example, I bought a buffered powder that will give me 12 grams of Vitamin C in 14 oz of solution. When I make this I am going to add enough extra Vitamin C to make 1g/oz.

That sounds very easy! Liposomal vitamin C can be very pricey too, so this home version one is brilliant!

So it is the fat that makes the whole difference. Soy lecithin can be replaced with sunflower lecithin which is getting used more often as a replacement for the soy extract. This should be available in health stores.
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Gaby

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 07:26:31 PM »
Some say liposomal vitamin C should be an adjunct to IV vitamin C, probably because there is not enough experience with it. It is so easy to make that I think it is worth trying it and see if people share more of their experiences with it. It is another good way of getting fat into your body. I wonder if the ketogenic diet makes vitamin C more "lyposomal", or if other fats could be used other than sunflower or soy lecithin.

Quote
The Supplement Almost Everyone Should Take When They Are Sick

_http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/11/20/ronald-hunninghake-on-vitamin-c.aspx

Dr. Ronald Hunninghake is an internationally recognized expert on vitamin C who has personally supervised more than 60,000 intravenous (IV) vitamin C administrations.

[...]

Dr. Hunninghake tries to explain:

"I'm sure there are several factors here. Number one, most people think of vitamin C as a vitamin. You define vitamin as a trace amount of a substance that you need to prevent [ailments like] scurvy, in the case of vitamin C. But what we're talking about here is something in a pharmacological range.

The way to really understand vitamin C is to go back to the writings of Irwin Stone who wrote The Healing Factor, which was a fantastic book written in the 70s about vitamin C.

He points out that every creature, when they are sick, greatly increase their liver's or their kidney's production of vitamin C. But humans, primates, and guinea pigs have lost that ability.

We still have the gene that makes the L-gulonolactone oxidase enzyme that converts glucose to vitamin C but it's non-functional. We have to get our vitamin C from the outside; from food.

When we give vitamin C intravenously, what we're doing is recreating your liver's ability to synthesize tremendous amounts of vitamin C.


… So I always look upon high dose vitamin C as nature's way of dealing with crisis in terms of your health. This notion however does not exist in the conventional thinking in the medical mind."

There are also financial factors. The standard oncology treatments are extremely expensive while I.V. vitamin C is relatively inexpensive. And conventional medicine, as a general rule, is notoriously uninterested in solutions that can't produce profits.

Administration Methods and Dosage Recommendations

There are two primary ways you can administer vitamin C; orally and intravenously.

"For the average patient, I… encourage them to take at least the Linus Pauling dose, which is 1 gram, twice a day, of vitamin C," Hunninghake says.

"Certainly you can do more than that. If you're suffering from chronic infections or chronic fatigue you can go ahead and gradually increase your dose up to what's called the bowel tolerance dose.

It's very safe. The idea that vitamin C causes kidney stones has been completely disproven... There have been several studies by urologists that have shown that is not an issue with high-dose vitamin C.

For the typical patient oral [supplementation] is fine, but if you have a serious illness, you should think in terms of doing intravenous vitamin C from a practitioner because it can greatly amplify and change the benefits of I.V. vitamin C."

As for the typical dosage for intravenous vitamin C, the Riordan IVC protocol calls for a starting dose around 15 grams.

However, it's important to first get your G6PD (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) level checked.

Check for G6PD Deficiency Before Starting I.V. Vitamin C

G6PD is an enzyme that your red blood cells need to maintain membrane integrity.

What many people don't understand is that high dose intravenous vitamin C is a strong pro-oxidant. And giving a pro-oxidant to a G6PD-deficient patient can cause hemolysis of their red blood cells.

So administering intravenous vitamin C is not for the novice.

I strongly recommend getting it done by an experienced practitioner who uses the Riordan protocol or some other protocol that ensures the vitamin C is administered in a safe manner.

Fortunately, G6PC deficiency is relatively uncommon. People of Mediterranean- and African decent are at greater risk, but it's rare even in those groups. In one series of over 800 G6PD tests, Hunninghake only found four people with a deficiency.

So it's not a great concern, but should you happen to be that rare person with a deficiency, the ramifications of barreling ahead with high dose I.V. vitamin C could be disastrous.

 Dr. Riordan's original research suggested that you need to achieve a vitamin C blood level of around 300-350 mg/dl in order to achieve selective cytotoxicity. However, Hunninghake claims blood levels around 250 mg/dl may be sufficient to have an anti-cancer effect.

Dr. Hunninghake expounds on this issue:

"Now, just to put that into perspective for the average person, if we were to measure someone off the street, their blood level would be about 1 mg/dl if they're eating a fairly decent diet. If they're less than 0.6 mg per dl, they're into a scurvy type range of vitamin C.

But what we're talking about for a post-IVC saturation level, giving, let's say 25 to 50 grams of vitamin C intravenously over about a 90-minute period, is in the 200 to 300 mg/dl range.

So we're talking about 200 to 300 times the normal amount of vitamin C that your blood normally experiences just eating a balanced diet."

It's important to understand that these extremely high levels are really only indicated for the treatment cancers and infectious diseases, not for every-day, general health. This is because vitamin C, which will always be an antioxidant, nevertheless starts to have a pro-oxidant effect at these extreme levels.

Interestingly, this pro-oxidant effect may actually be responsible for vitamin C's anti-cancerous properties

Hunninghake explains:

"… At our second annual Riordan IVC and Cancer Conference held a few weeks ago in Japan, we had Dr. H. Chen, who was the author, along with Mark Levine, on high dose vitamin C as a source for creating hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular space surrounding tumor cells.

It's thought that it is this hydrogen peroxide, or pro-oxidant effect, of vitamin C that's causing the anti-tumor property. It's also that same pro-oxidant effect that, in fact, helps your body get rid of infectious disease."

To hear Dr. Hunninghake share some of the remarkable recoveries from difficult to treat cancers and other diseases, please listen to the interview in its entirety, or read through the transcript.

What You Need to Know About Oral Vitamin C

The latest version of oral vitamin C supplementation is liposomal vitamin C, which I was introduced to by Dr. Thomas Levy, who is clearly one of the leaders in this area.

Liposomal vitamin C bypasses many of the complications of traditional vitamin C or ascorbic acid, and, according to Dr. Levy, you can achieve far higher intracellular concentrations this way.

"I'm all in favor of people trying this," Hunninghake says. "I think it can be used as an adjunct to I.V. vitamin C. Most people are only going to do I.V. vitamin C once or twice a week. So by doing the liposomal vitamin C, they can easily do 6 grams of liposomal vitamin C orally without a bit of gastrointestinal distress."

From Hunninghake's perspective, liposomal vitamin C may still be somewhat unproven, but is nonetheless quite safe.

There are also other forms of vitamin C on the market, such as buffered forms of sodium ascorbate. One example would be Ester-C. These buffered forms are also effective and do not cause the gastrointestinal distress associated with conventional ascorbic acid.

So far, I have recommended avoiding Ester-C, as I believe it's an oxidized form of vitamin C, which could do more harm than good. Dr. Hunninghake disagrees with my assessment, stating he's never seen any evidence indicating that Ester-C might be an oxidized form of vitamin C.

Based on Dr. Hunninghake's expertise in this area, I may reconsider my stance on Ester-C, although I still believe liposomal vitamin C has benefits that cannot be matched by buffered forms of vitamin C.

Dosing Frequency Can Also Make a Difference

Another factor to keep in mind when taking oral vitamin C is dosing frequency.

Dr. Steve Hickey, who wrote the book Ascorbate, has shown that if you take vitamin C frequently throughout the day, you can achieve much higher plasma levels. So even though your kidneys will tend to rapidly excrete the vitamin C, by taking it every hour or two, you can maintain a much higher plasma level than if you just dose it once a day (unless you're taking an extended release form of vitamin C).

There are also a number of people, primarily with the naturopathic perspective, who believe that in order to be truly effective, ascorbic acid alone is not enough -- you need the combination of the ascorbic acid with its associated micronutrients, such as bioflavonoids and other components.

Hunninghake agrees.

"There is no question that would be a better way to go. Any time you can [get it from] food, you're going to be better off… [F]ood is still the essential thing your body needs in order to get optimal cellular functioning.

But when you're sick, you can use trace nutrients in orthomolecular doses to achieve effects that you can't get from just food alone.

But in general, for people who are healthy and want to stay healthy, I would recommend using vitamin C that has bioflavonoids and other co-factors associated with it."

[...]

If you, or someone you know, want more information about using vitamin C as an adjunct to your cancer protocol, please visit www.RiordanClinic.org, where you can find the Riordan IVC Protocol discussed above. That site also contains a number of research articles so that you can review the evidence for yourself.

Dr. Hunninghake has also created a video on how vitamin C fights cancer, available at www.HealthHunterOnline.org. [...]
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Horseofadiffer entcolor

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2013, 07:30:25 PM »
  I found this about egg lecithin and it seems like a good way to make some really healthy vit C mayo.

Egg Yolks
 
According to the United Soybean Board, the word "lecithin" is derived from "lekithos," the Greek word for egg yolk. Prior to the isolation of lecithin in the 19th century, eggs served as the primary source of lecithin in most foods. As whole egg yolks may not be the perfect replacement for soy lecithin in most recipes, you may wish to look for egg yolk lecithin at your local health food store or supermarket


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/481727-soy-lecithin-substitute/#ixzz2HsiJt6na

Offline Gaby

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2013, 07:41:53 PM »
Here is the study where liposomal vitamin C was given and its blood levels were measured. They achieved levels of 400 after a single dose of 36 grams of liposomal vitamin C.

_http://www.livonlabs.com/proof/Dr_Hickey_Clinical_Study_Published.pdf

Quote
Our findings have important implications for therapy. The role of pharmacological levels
of nutrients in cancer and other diseases is currently being re-evaluated [22]. In particular,
the cytotoxic action of ascorbate on cancer cells suggests the possibility of a potentially non-
toxic cancer therapy [23,24]. However, it has been assumed that cytotoxic levels of
ascorbate could only be achieved with intravenous infusions of sodium ascorbate [8]. This
would be an implication of the available data, if oral doses could achieve only 220 mML21 in
plasma. However, we have demonstrated that single doses of liposomal formulations can
give levels above 400 mML21. If given in a single dose to a fasting individual, such intakes
might be impractical. However, these preliminary findings suggest that plasma levels of
500–600 mML21 or more could be sustained indefinitely with smaller, but repeated, oral
intakes
.

The person of the study had diarrhea, so smaller and more frequent doses have to be taken.
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Gaby

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2013, 07:52:56 PM »
The same study reports the blood levels after an intake of 5 grams of liposomal vitamin C, which was over 220. This is the same level achieved after an IV vitamin C of 25 to 50 grams. Not that bad at all!

Another interesting article (lots of hyperlinks):

Quote
Did Liposomal Vitamin C Cure Cancer?

By Michael Mooney - Updated November, 2012

_http://www.michaelmooney.net/DidLiposomalVitaminCCureCancer.html

Allan Smith was near death in a coma and about to be taken off life support, with swine flu, non-functioning "white" lungs and leukemia when he was given high-dose intravenous vitamin C, followed by a new oral “nano-sized” vitamin C product that anyone can buy or make in our kitchens. (See instructions later in this report.)

He started to revive from the coma when he was given daily doses of intravenous vitamin C ranging from 25 grams to 100 grams a day.

Then a new hospital doctor didn’t believe that vitamin C caused the improvement in his condition so he lowered the dose to 2 grams a day, wherebye Mr. Smith continued to improve, but far more slowly.

That’s when his family started giving him 6 grams of liposomal “nano” vitamin C a day, orally. He continued to improve and today he is healthy and his leukemia is gone.

Click here to watch a New Zealand television news report video about him.

The video is 17 minutes long. Towards the end you’ll see him being given a 1 gram packet of LivOn Brand Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C, which is a very high quality commercially available version of liposomal “nano” vitamin C that costs about a dollar per gram (1,000 mg) of vitamin C.

Or go here to read, in detail, what happened. This includes details of studies that show that IV vitamin C can effectively fight cancer because it can deliver high enough vitamin C blood levels, where oral tablets or capsules cannot create high enough blood levels.

Reports say that six grams of oral liposomally-carried vitamin C is equal in delivering vitamin C inside cells, where it does its work, to 50 grams of intravenous vitamin C. This is a bit confusing, because studies show that IV vitamin C creates higher vitamin C blood levels.

However, blood levels don't necessarily equate to levels inside cells.

Water soluble nutrients like vitamin C have a difficult time passing through the barrier that coat cell walls. The barrier on cell walls is made up of the same oil-based bi-layer that liposomes have. This oil-based barrier is meant to control what gets into cells and what comes out of cells.

Because it is made of the same oil-based barrier that cell walls have, liposomal vitamin C is transported through the cell walls much more efficiently then vitamin C not carried in liposomes because the liposomes that carry vitamin C fuse with the same material and configuration that resides on cell walls.

Tablets Versus Intravenous Versus Liposomes

Putting vitamin C or any water-soluble nutrient in liposomes can reportedly deliver as much as 90% absorption of the nutrient into the cells in our bodies.

For point of reference, intravenous vitamin C reportedly gives about 20% absorption into cells while taking high potency tablets of vitamin C reportedly gives considerably less.

So, orally-taken liposomal vitamin C works better than higher doses of injectable intravenous vitamin C at delivering vitamin C inside cells, where it does its work - and far better than vitamin C tablets.

This is a huge breakthrough!

Dosing

Remember that dose, six grams a day, because it saved the New Zealand man and cured his leukemia, so it’s likely that six grams a day might cure other cancers, or other diseases, too.

Reading

LivOn Labs has a collection of studies on liposomes. To view them click here. And please take a tour of their web site. It has lots of valuable information, including a study that looked at blood levels of vitamin C delivered with liposomes.

Several sites, like racehorseherbal have detailed scientific information about liposomal nutrients. Note the statement towards the bottom of that page where highly respected vitamin C researcher, Thomas Levy, MD. says that if he had to choose between intravenous vitamin C and liposomal vitamin C for a critical medical application with a patient he would choose liposomal vitamin C.

Also worth a quick scan for their information on liposomal vitamin C is this web site: http://www.anti-agingresearchcenter.org/bio-technology/LET-Vitamin-C.html

This booklet, PC Liposomal Encapsulation Technology, by Robert Milne, MD, details the many significant health benefits that liposomes can give us.

Why Some Researchers Still Think Vitamin C Doesn't Cure Cancer

Dr. Mark Levine, a US National Institutes of Health researcher, said that the reason vitamin C hadn’t been shown to cure cancer was because researchers had focused on using oral vitamin C, which only gives a few percent delivery into our cells.

He said vitamin C has to be given intravenously to get the kind of high dose delivery into cells that is effective against cancers. (Until now - with liposomal vitamin C.)

See an article about Dr. Levine at: http://www.michaelmooney.net/AttemptingtomakethecaseforvitaminC.htm

Then see a published study with three cases of IV vitamin C cancer cures: http://www.cmaj.ca/content/174/7/937.full.pdf+html

Good For All of Us

If you don’t have cancer, reasons to take liposomal vitamin C include healthier skin, because vitamin C stimulates collagen production. Skin is mostly made up of collagen. In fact, collagen is the “glue” that holds our entire body together. Having healthier collage also means healthier joints, ligaments, tendons and bones.

Better collagen makes stronger, more flexible bones that absorb impact better for less fall-down fractures, according to published research.

Vitamin C also improves immune strength for as much as 85% less colds and flu and reduces the risk of numerous diseases.

For instance, Fredrick R. Klenner, MD, (October 22, 1907 - May 20, 1984) who was the first medical doctor to use high dose intravenous vitamin C cured 60 out of 60 cases of polio, as well as numerous other viral diseases.

Additionally, higher doses of vitamin C can help to lower elevated blood pressure, according to
several studies. One person I know had their elevated blood pressure drop 10 points in both systolic and diastolic into the healthy range a few days after starting two packets a day of LivOn brand Lypo-Spheric vitamin C.

While liposomal vitamin C is likely the first line nutrient when cancer is addressed, liposomal glutathione might also be enlisted.

If someone had liver cancer or hepatitis or another liver disease, or were recovering from liver cancer surgery, liposomal glutathione is the logical first line nutrient to consider to improve liver health. One animal study showed that when a liver cancer-causing agent was introduced to the animals, IV glutathione administration caused regression of the tumors, resulting in the animals surviving.

Another such study showed that increasing glutathione reversed lethal acetaminophen (Tylenol) liver toxicity.

Buying Liposomal Nutrients

I bought LivOn Brand Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C from HealthE Goods. Several other vendors sell it, including HealthE Goods, THEGREENPHARMACY, GoldenTigerLipids, Amazon and others.

When I first bought from HealthE Goods they were discounting LivON products. LivOn Labs has since mandated that the lowest price its vendors can sell their Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C for is $29.95 for a box of 30 packets. But some vendors are selling it for more.

I haven't seen LivOn liposomal nutrients in health food stores in Southern California - yet. I hope they find favor and get wide-spread distribution.

Retailer health food stores won't have to worry about competing with internet discount sites because of LivOn's "lowest retail price" mandate.

There are only three LivOn brand liposomal products at present: vitamin C, GSH - glutathione and AGE Blocker, a multi-nutrient formula that highlights benfotiamine, an especially anti-aging form of vitamin B1.

LetsTalkHealth, long-time health-food pioneer, Dr. Kurt Donsbach's website sells several liquid liposomal products, including vitamin C, glutathione, resveratrol, CoQ10, curcumin and Re-Lev-It, a liposomal pain reliever. He makes two sizes of several products and his prices are among the lowest of all the liposomal nutrient manufacturers. I usually buy from LetsTalkHealth.

Other liposomal nutrient manufacturers include ReadiSorb, which makes liposomal glutathione, melatonin and vitamin B12 and Lipoflow. (Lipoflow has the laboratory that makes the LivOn products, but the LivOn products are easier to find as they are sold by more vendors.)

ReadiSorb liposomal glutathione was investigated in a study published in the medical journal Atherosclerosis, that showed very interesting beneficial cardiovascular effects. This gives us an idea of the quality of this company. They're involved in real research.

There's also Dr's Best Curcumin Phytosome (Meriva) liposomal curcumin, in capsules. As expected, there will be more manufacturers selling liposomal nutrients.

It's on the crest of a wave of superior delivery of nutrients that can cure cancer and other diseases, so of course, there will be more liposomal nutrient companies. Therefore, this article does not provide a complete list of liposomal nutrient companies, as more continue to come to the marketplace.

Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
Where the LivOn vitamin C product costs about $1 a gram, and Dr. Donsbach's costs about 50 cents/gram, doing it yourself (DIY) costs about 15 cents a gram.

Scientist Brooks Bradley, who created the DIY method says that DIY is between 50 and 70% as potent as the commercial products because the commercial products are made with high-tech lab equipment. But even at 50 to 70%, DIY would be as effective as intravenous vitamin C.

Bradley confirmed that the DIY method yielded liposomes that are small enough to be effective. To read what he said, click here.

Here is a YOUTUBE video showing one way to make it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeU--wadrMY

Click here for more detailed instructions and a way to test for potency from scientist Brooks Bradley.

But the method I like most comes from Krispin Sullivan. Her method gives you more potency in less volume. Click here to read it.

Also for those who want to get good at making liposomal nutrients, there's a Yahoo group for you.
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/DIY-LET/messages

To Make Liposomal Vitamin C (Or any nutrient)
You need an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner. There are basically three sizes that are easily found.

There are 1 liter ultrasonic jewelry cleaners like the New Trent 7810 Ultrasonic Jewelry Cleaner for $35.95.

Then there's a 2.5 liter Chicago Jewelry Cleaner for $74.99. The bigger machine is reported to create a stronger ultrasonic signal, which yields more smaller liposomes that deliver intracellular nutrients better.

And there's a 3 liter professional cleaner by DSA for $149.99, which I use. This machine may create the most smaller liposomes.

I bought non-GMO soy lecithin, made by Now Foods.

Note that the commercial liposomal vitamin C manufacturers use the sodium ascorbate form of vitamin C, which is reported to have signficantly better intracellular delivery than the ascorbic acid form of vitamin C.

For my first batch of liposomal vitamin C I used ascorbic acid. But now I'm using sodium ascorbate.

You can make liposomal forms of other nutrients, too. I intend on making liposomal resveratrol, CoQ10, glutathione and some others.

Caution: Liposomes Can Work Too Well

Because of the tremendous input of nutrients that happen with liposomal delivery, it is possible to experience what is known as a Herxheimer Reaction if you have too much too fast.

What happens when there is an Herxheimer Reaction is that because the nutrient delivery is extremely effective viruses and other invading organisms that are in our bodies die fast in great numbers.

When this happens our bodies have to excrete the unusually high amount of die-off.

So far two people have reported to me what appear to be Herxheimer Reactions using liposomal nutrients.

One person started taking liposomal vitamin C, glutathione and resveratrol several times a day and found themselves coughing up what could have been phlegm for several days, but the consistency of what they coughed up was exactly like the liposomal materials they had taken.

It was as if they had a cold, with normal discharges - but the discharges were liposomal material, and without the inflammatory pain and debilitation that a real cold causes. This resolved within a week.

The message here is to start with a low dose of the liposomal nutrient, like one dose or two doses a day and take that for a week or two to acclimate to it.

I take liposomal nutrients twice a day. But if I was dealing with cancer or another disease I would likely take liposomal vitamin C six times a day, as the LivOn product, because it is documented to work.

UPDATE: One person with breast cancer's personal experience.

An 80-year old friend has breast cancer. In February, 2012, the tumor size was a 6. She began taking 1 gram of LivOn Lipospheric Vitamin C six times a day and has experienced a consistent shrinking of the tumor size, which continues to amaze her doctor. The doctor measured the tumor as 2.5 in November, 2012.
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Alana

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2013, 07:35:34 PM »
I was looking up liposomal vit C and found this site also that offers tips on how to make it at home, so i'll save it here for reference:

http://www.quantumbalancing.com/liposomalC.htm

Quote
How to Make Liposomal Vitamin C

Vitamin C is the most used supplement in the world. There is good reason for this as the science behind the many benefits of vitamin C is solid. Dr. Svent Gyorgi and Dr. Linus Pauling performed innumerable experiments proving that man, unlike most animals, is dependent upon vitamin C for a healthy existence. For decades we have relied upon various ascorbic formulas for our supplemental needs, but now a whole new vista opens up with Liposomal technology.

Increase Absorption Dramatically - Regular vitamin C is absorbed at approximately 19%, the balance remains in the gastrointestinal tract to attract water and loosen the bowels. Nanotechnology, liposomalized vitamin C is absorbed at 93%, measurable in the blood stream. A 390% increase in absorption! Get IV results with oral dosage!

    Heat one cup of distilled water in a ceramic coated or stainless steel pan on your stove (do not heat it in a microwave oven) until almost boiling.
    Pour the water into your blender and add three level tablespoons of lecithin and blend until all of the lecithin is totally dissolved in the water.
    In one cup of cold distilled water, dissolve one level tablespoon of ascorbic acid. Make sure it is totally dissolved, very important!
    Add the ascorbic acid mixture to the lecithin mixture and blend well.
    Pour the mixture into the ultrasonic cleaner and turn it on. Stir frequently.
    The cleaner will turn itself off about every two minutes or so. You continue to stir frequently and turn the cleaner back on until ALL of the foam is gone. Repeat: Continue to stir and turn the cleaner back on until ALL OF THE FOAM IS GONE!! This will take about 30 minutes or so. When done you will have a mix that is about the color of milk. There will be some settling but shouldn't be much, less than 5% of the mix or so.

    When done, pour mix into a reseal able GLASS jar and store in your refrigerator.

    Take one teaspoon full of mix once a day.

    You can experiment with this amount after you have taken it for awhile to see how it effects you.

    Take on an empty stomach and wait at least 15 minutes before eating anything.

    Many take it in the morning before breakfast.

    It is really sour tasting so many chase it with water to get the taste out of the mouth.

Another Excellent Recipe is Shown Here:

This recipe will give you a product between 7.0 and 7.5 (measured with Alkalive pH Stix) or similar pH to human blood so there is no risk of over acidifying your blood should you take significant amounts of your homemade Liposomal Vitamin C Ascorbate.

(Blood pH is tightly controlled by the body at near 7.35 pH.   If your blood pH were much above or below that number you would be a very sick person.)

Creating an identical pH in your liposomal brew is simply a matter of carefully adjusting the level of bicarbonate of soda.

This Vitamin C Ascorbate recipe is a compilation of several postings on forums and Pdazzler’s own trials in the kitchen.
Using a small (2 cup) Ultrasonic cleaner, (Item #03305, obtainable from Harbor Freight @ about $30.00), we performed the following:

1. In qt mixing jar pour 1 cup of distilled water. Add 3 level Tablespoons of granular soy lecithin (NOW has non-genetically modified soy lecithin) and agitate vigorously for 3 – 5 minutes.

Then place the lecithin mixture in the refrigerator for two or more hours.   (You can leave in refrigerator overnight if you prefer.)   This allows lecithin granules to soak up water for easy mixing into solution.

Note:  Mixing can be accomplished easier if you raise the temperature of the distilled water being used to 45 degrees Celsius (113 degrees Fahrenheit). I have found this unnecessary in getting high quality mixtures but others have found this warmer temperature helpful.

After 2 hour soaking period vigorously agitate the mixture for another 3 – 5 minutes.   At the conclusion there should be no lecithin granules visible.   Set this smooth lecithin mixture aside.

2. Dissolved 1 level Tablespoon of Pharmaceutical grade Vitamin C powder in 2 oz. of distilled water.   We recommend you use a 6 oz. or larger screw lid jar so you can shake vigorously.

3. Dissolve 1 Heaping Tablespoon of Bob’s Red Mill Bicarbonate of Soda (Bob’s is Aluminum free) in 2 oz. of distilled water using a separate 6 oz. or larger screw lid jar.   Shake or agitate the mixture 3 minutes or until soda dissolved.

*One mole of sodium bicarbonate is 84 grams, and one mole of ascorbic acid is 176 grams. So, the correct (stoichiometric) ratio of sodium bicarbonate to ascorbic acid is 84/176 = 0.477. For example, it would take 477 milligrams of sodium bicarbonate to neutralize 1000 milligrams of ascorbic acid.

**What follows is often the most difficult part of the process for those new to making homemade liposomal Vitamin C Ascorbate.

While stirring the Vitamin C / distilled water solution very slowly pour/dribble the dissolved bicarbonate of soda/water mixture into the Vitamin C / distilled water solution.  (Pour soda solution very slowly as the resulting mixture will bubble.  By pouring slowing and constantly stirring you will be able to mix the two without bubbling over.)

At the conclusion of mixing the bicarbonate of soda mixture into the Vitamin C mixture all bubbling will cease.   If you have any soda settled in the jar pour the resulting total mix together into that jar, swirl and pour the resulting Vitamin C / Bicarbonate of Soda mixture into the Ultrasonic Cleaner.

4. Pour the Lecithin solution into ultrasonic cleaner bowl with the Vitamin C / Bicarbonate of Soda mixture and stir the contents together.

5. Turn the ultrasonic cleaner on and using a plastic straw (leaving the top of the cleaner opened), gently, slowly, stirred the contents.

Note: The cleaner will, automatically, self-stop about every 2 minutes. Just push ON button to continue. Repeat for a total of 6 series (12 – 18 minutes). By that time the entire solution should be blended into a cloudy, homogeneous, milk-like mixture. The LET solution is now well  formed.

You can raise the level of encapsulation by continuing several more ultrasonic cycles if desired.

This protocol furnishes 12 grams (12000mg.) of Vitamin C Ascorbate. At an estimated/theoretical 70% – 90% encapsulation efficiency, 8400 mg would be of the LET type. This solution will keep, acceptably, at room temperature for 3 to 4 days. Refrigerated, it will keep much longer.

Note: A larger, more powerful, ultrasonic cleaner is available at Harbor Freight. Item number 91593. 2+ liters, for about $80.00. Both units perform well. The larger unit will allow you to make higher quality liposomal or more encapsulated supplement at one time, depending on the amount you mix.

This article was written and submitted by an anonymous Australian researcher and this method has yielded excellent results everytime we have use it. For informational and educational purposes only. Void where prohibited.

Shane describes here how he made some himself using the above method with the ultrasonic cleaner. I will try getting some on-line to start with, but I think that knowing how to do it at home will come very handy in the future too.
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Online LQB

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 07:54:38 PM »
I noticed the LivOn Lipo-C product mentions a contraindication for oxalic acid formation.   :huh:

I'm experimenting right now with ascorbal palmitate powder mixed with ghee and some curcumin. I may try mixing a bigger batch with a high speed cuisinart spice grinder. I may also try mixing a batch of DHA with calcium ascorbate.

I'm a little leery of any soy-based lecithin.
The only thing that seems to offer a way out is simply to observe the phenomena and compare the perceptions with a lot of other folks and try to narrow down the "constant" that is present in all of them.  In this way, we can have a closer idea of what the Third Man REALLY is, and what he is REALLY doing, and what then, should be our best response.  And, of course, "observing phenomena" means, in its most literal sense, to gain and gather knowledge of every form and sort so that one has a sufficient database from which to draw conclusions about observations of one's environment.

                                                                                                                                                                                 Laura Knight-Jadczyk

Offline Gaby

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 07:58:50 PM »
I'm a little leery of any soy-based lecithin.

They sell sunflower lecithin on health stores which you can use instead of the soy one.
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Laura

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2013, 08:02:41 PM »
When the lecithin is extracted from the soy it's not a problem.  There are lots of things you wouldn't eat from which useful things are extracted and the poisonous stuff thrown away.

Read the article I posted previously in this thread about the palmitate business versus the oxydized vitamin C
He who learns must suffer
And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget
Falls drop by drop upon the heart,
And in our own despair, against our will,
Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2013, 08:44:23 PM »
When the lecithin is extracted from the soy it's not a problem.  There are lots of things you wouldn't eat from which useful things are extracted and the poisonous stuff thrown away.

Read the article I posted previously in this thread about the palmitate business versus the oxydized vitamin C

True, like nattokinase from bacteria grown in soy.

I did read the article and comments on the blog post at the link. I noticed a few reservations expressed about large doses of DHA. I think this is the paper referred to in one of the blog posts:

_http://www.pnas.org/content/98/20/11720.full.pdf+html

Added: Also found calcium ascorbate in bulk here at $45/kilo (_http://purebulk.com/calcium-ascorbate-powder.html)
« Last Edit: January 14, 2013, 08:53:14 PM by LQB »
The only thing that seems to offer a way out is simply to observe the phenomena and compare the perceptions with a lot of other folks and try to narrow down the "constant" that is present in all of them.  In this way, we can have a closer idea of what the Third Man REALLY is, and what he is REALLY doing, and what then, should be our best response.  And, of course, "observing phenomena" means, in its most literal sense, to gain and gather knowledge of every form and sort so that one has a sufficient database from which to draw conclusions about observations of one's environment.

                                                                                                                                                                                 Laura Knight-Jadczyk

Offline ytain

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2013, 09:07:32 PM »
The liposomal vitamin C reminds me of the tibetan teas done the old way. I read in this forum how the old way tibetan teas are made and it is done by churning the butter into the tea in special wooden tubes ( _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter_tea ). From this you can see that their method creates something similar with encapsulating the tea's compounds into the liposomes contained in the butter (the butter made from yak's milk).
It remains to see if the butter made from yak's milk contain or not the lecithin or liposomes.

Ytain
« Last Edit: January 14, 2013, 09:13:05 PM by ytain »

Offline Gimpy

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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2013, 04:06:55 AM »
When the lecithin is extracted from the soy it's not a problem.  There are lots of things you wouldn't eat from which useful things are extracted and the poisonous stuff thrown away.

Read the article I posted previously in this thread about the palmitate business versus the oxydized vitamin C

I've been having a rough time last couple weeks with upper right side pain, rashes, allergies going nuts etc. Going to try the lipsomal liquid vit C from amazon, looking into that now.

Once its here will have a go at it and report back.
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Re: Re: Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2013, 02:45:10 PM »

When the lecithin is extracted from the soy it's not a problem.  There are lots of things you wouldn't eat from which useful things are extracted and the poisonous stuff thrown away.

Read the article I posted previously in this thread about the palmitate business versus the oxydized vitamin C

Here are excerpts from Kaayla Daniel's book on soy as published in a 2003 WAPF Journal (_http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/soy-lecithin-from-sludge-to-profit?qh=YTo3OntpOjA7czozOiJzb3kiO2k6MTtzOjM6InNvaSI7aToyO3M6NDoic295cyI7aTozO3M6ODoibGVjaXRoaW4iO2k6NDtzOjEwOiJsw6ljaXRoaW5lIjtpOjU7czo5OiJsZWNpdGhpbnMiO2k6NjtzOjEyOiJzb3kgbGVjaXRoaW4iO30%3D)

Quote
Soy Lecithin: From Sludge to Profit

Excerpt from Kaayla Daniel's book: The Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America's Favorite Health Food (New Trends, Spring 2004).

Lecithin is an emulsifying substance that is found in the cells of all living organisms. The French scientist Maurice Gobley discovered lecithin in 1805 and named it "lekithos" after the Greek word for "egg yolk." Until it was recovered from the waste products of soybean processing in the 1930s, eggs were the primary source of commercial lecithin. Today lecithin is the generic name given to a whole class of fat-and-water soluble compounds called phospholipids. Levels of phospholipids in soybean oils range from 1.48 to 3.08 percent, which is considerably higher than the 0.5 percent typically found in vegetable oils, but far less than the 30 percent found in egg yolks.1-6
Out of the Dumps

Soybean lecithin comes from sludge left after crude soy oil goes through a "degumming" process. It is a waste product containing solvents and pesticides and has a consistency ranging from a gummy fluid to a plastic solid. Before being bleached to a more appealing light yellow, the color of lecithin ranges from a dirty tan to reddish brown. The hexane extraction process commonly used in soybean oil manufacture today yields less lecithin than the older ethanol-benzol process, but produces a more marketable lecithin with better color, reduced odor and less bitter flavor.7

Historian William Shurtleff reports that the expansion of the soybean crushing and soy oil refining industries in Europe after 1908 led to a problem disposing the increasing amounts of fermenting, foul-smelling sludge. German companies then decided to vacuum dry the sludge, patent the process and sell it as "soybean lecithin." Scientists hired to find some use for the substance cooked up more than a thousand new uses by 1939.8

Today lecithin is ubiquitous in the processed food supply. It is most commonly used as an emulsifier to keep water and fats from separating in foods such as margarine, peanut butter, chocolate candies, ice cream, coffee creamers and infant formulas. Lecithin also helps prevent product spoilage, extending shelf life in the marketplace. In industry kitchens, it is used to improve mixing, speed crystallization, prevent "weeping," and stop spattering, lumping and sticking. Used in cosmetics, lecithin softens the skin and helps other ingredients penetrate the skin barrier. A more water-loving version known as "deoiled lecithin" reduces the time required to shut down and clean the extruders used in the manufacture of textured vegetable protein and other soy products.9,10

In theory, lecithin manufacture eliminates all soy proteins, making it hypoallergenic. In reality, minute amounts of soy protein always remain in lecithin as well as in soy oil. Three components of soy protein have been identified in soy lecithin, including the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, which has a track record of triggering severe allergic reactions even in the most minuscule quantities. The presence of lecithin in so many food and cosmetic products poses a special danger for people with soy allergies.11-13
Lec Is In: The Making of a Wonder Food

Lecithin has been touted for years as a wonder food capable of combating atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, liver cirrhosis, gall stones, psoriasis, eczema, scleroderma, anxiety, tremors and brain aging. Because it is well known that the human body uses phospholipids to build strong, flexible cell membranes and to facilitate nerve transmission, health claims have been made for soy lecithin since the 1920s. Dr. A. A. Horvath, a leading purveyor of soybean health claims at the time, thought it could be used in "nerve tonics" or to help alcoholics reduce the effects of intoxication and withdrawal. In 1934, an article entitled "A Comfortable and Spontaneous Cure for the Opium Habit by Means of Lecithin" was written by Chinese researchers and published in an English language medical journal.14

Lecithin, though, did not capture the popular imagination until the 1960s and 1970s when the bestselling health authors Adelle Davis, Linda Clark and Mary Ann Crenshaw hyped lecithin in their many books, including Let’s Get Well, Secrets of Health and Beauty and The Natural Way to Super Beauty: Featuring the Amazing Lecithin, Apple Cider Vinegar, B-6 and Kelp Diet.15-17

Lecithin did not become a star of the health food circuit by accident. Research took off during the early 1930s, right when lecithin production became commercially viable. In 1939, the American Lecithin Company began sponsoring research studies, and published the most promising in a 23-page booklet entitled Soybean Lecithin in 1944. The company, not coincidentally introduced a health food cookie with a lecithin filling known as the "Lexo Wafer" and a lecithin/wheat germ supplement called Granulestin. In the mid 1970s, Natterman, a lecithin marketing company based in Germany, hired scientists at various health clinics to experiment with lecithin and to write scientific articles about it. These "check book" scientists coined the term "essential phospholipids" an inaccurate term since a healthy body can produce its own phospholipids from phosphorous and lipids.18

In September 2001, lecithin got a boost when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized products containing enough of it to bear labels such as "A good source of choline." Producers of soy lecithin hope to find ways to help the new health claim lift demand for lecithin and increase prices in what has been a soft market. Eggs, milk and soy products are the leading dietary sources of choline, according to recent research conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at Duke University.19-21
Lec That's More: Phosphatidyl Choline (PC)

Because many lecithin products sold in health food stores contain less than 30 percent choline, many clinicians prefer to use the more potent Phosphatidylcholine (PC) or its even more powerful derivative drug Glyceryl-phosphorylcholine (GPC). Both are being used to prevent and reverse dementia, improve cognitive function, increase human growth hormone (hGH) release, and to treat brain disorders such as damage from stroke. PC and GPC may help build nerve cell membranes, facilitate electrical transmission in the brain, hold membrane proteins in place, and produce the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.22-24 However, studies on soy lecithin, PC, and brain aging have been inconsistent and contradictory ever since the 1920s. Generally, lecithin is regarded as safe except for people who are highly allergic to soy. However, the late Robert Atkins, MD, advised patients not to take large doses of supplemental lecithin without extra vitamin C to protect them from the nitrosamines formed from choline metabolism. Trimethylamine and dimethylamine, which are metabolized by bacteria in the intestines from choline, are important precurors to N-nitrosodimethylamine, a potent carcinogen in a wide variety of animal species.25-27
Phosphatidyl Serine (PS)

Phosphatidyl serine (PS) -- another popular phospholipid that improves brain function and mental acuity – nearly always comes from soy oil. Most of the scientific studies proving its efficacy, however, come from bovine sources, which also contain DHA as part of the structure.28-31 Plant oils never contain readymade DHA. Indeed, the entire fatty acid structure is different; bovine derived PS is rich in stearic and oleic acids, while soy PS is rich in linoleic and palmitic acids.32 Complicating matters further, the PS naturally formed in the human body consists of 37.5 percent stearic acid and 24.2 percent arachidonic acid.33 Yet soy-derived PS seems to help many people.34-36

Russell Blaylock, MD, author of Excitotoxins, the Taste that Kills, explains that the probable reason PS works is because its chemical structure is similar to that of L-glutamate, the trouble-making neurotransmitter, amino acid and excitotoxin that exists in high concentration in MSG (monosodium glutamate), HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein) and "natural flavorings" and foods containing these soy derivatives. (See Chapter 11.) Because PS competes with glutamate, it may protect us from glutamate toxicity.37 Ironically, the expensive soy-derived supplement PS is being used to undo damage that may be caused in part by the cheap soy in processed foods
Lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), another phosphatidyl substance commercially extracted from soybeans, for use as a fruit ripener and shelf-life extender. LPE – once called cephalin -- is now being used to treat grapes, cranberries, strawberries, blueberries, apples, tomatoes, and cut flowers.

When applied to fruits that are nearly ripe – going into puberty, so to speak -- LPE promotes ripening. When applied to picked fruit or cut flowers that are already ripe or blooming, however, it will "reduce senescence by inhibiting some of the enzymes involved in membrane breakdown." This can dramatically extend shelf life.38 Whether the substance could also keep human bodies fresh for funeral home viewings has not yet been investigated.

REFERENCES

    Smith, Allan K and Circle, Sidney J. Soybeans: Chemistry and Technology, Vol 1, Proteins (Westport CT, Avi, 1972) 79.
    Berk, Zeki. Technology of production of edible flours and protein products from soybeans. FAO Agricultural Services Bulletin, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 97, 14.
    Nash AM, Eldridge AC, Wolf WJ. Fractionation and characterization of alcohol extractions associated with soybean proteins: nonprotein components. J Agr Food Chem, 1967, 15, 1, 106-108.
    Shurtleff, William and Aoyagi, Akiko. What Is Lecithin? Chapters 1-6 from History of Soy Lecithin. In Soyfoods: Past, Present and Future. Unpublished manuscript, (Lafayette, CA, Soyfoods Center, 1981).
    Wood and Allison, Effects of consumption of choline and lecithin on neurological and cardiovascular systems, Life Sciences Research Office, Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), 1981.
    Liu, KeShun. Soybeans: Chemistry, Technology, Utilization (Gaithersburg, MD, Aspen, 1999) 32.
    Shurtleff.
    Shurtleff.
    Berk.
    Shurtleff.
    Gu X, Beardslee T et al. Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin. Int Arch Allergy Immunol, 2001, 126, 3, 218-225.
    Mortimer EZ. Anaphylaxis following ingestion of soybean. Pediatr, 1961, 58, 90-92.
    Moroz LA, Yang WH. Kunitz soybean trypsin-inhibitor: a specific allergen in food anaphylaxis N Engl J Med, 1980, 302, 1126-1128.
    Shurtleff.
    Davis, Adelle. Let’s Get Well (NY, Signet/New American Library, 1965).
    Clark, Linda. Secrets of Health and Beauty (NY, Jove, 1969).
    Crenshaw, Mary Ann. The Natural Way to Super Beauty (NY, Dell, 1974).
    Shurtleff.
    Lecithin demand poised to gain on choline health claims. Chemical Business NewsBase, Chemical Market Reporter via NewsEdge Corporation 10/8/2201 posted on www.soyatech.com.
    FDA clears health claim for choline. National Press Club, Washington, DC.PR Newswire via NewsEdge Corporation. Posted 9/10/2201 on www.soyatech.com.
    Soy products --high in choline -- win labeling right. News Observer, Raleigh, NC via NewsEdge Corporation, posted 9/12/2201 www.soyatech.com.
    Amenta F, Parnetti L et al. Treatment of cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease with cholinergic precursors. Ineffective treatments or inappropriate approaches? Mech Ageing Dev, 2001, 122, 16, 2025-2040.
    Ceda GP, Ceresini G et al. Alpha-Glycerylphosphyorylcholine administration increases the GH responses to gHR of young and elderly subjects. Horm Metab Res, 1992, 24, 3, 119-121.
    Parnetti L et al. Choline alphoscerate in cognitive decline and in acute cerebrovascular disease: an analysis of published clinical data. Mec Ageing Dev, 2001, 122, 16, 2041-2055.
    Atkins, Robert. Dr. Atkins’ Vita-Nutrient Solution (Simon and Schuster, 1998). 78-80.
    Zeisel SH, Gettner S, Youssef M. Formation of aliphatic amine precursors of N-nitrosodimethylamine after oral administration of choline and choline analogues in the rat. Food Chem Toxicol, 1989, 27, 1, 31-34.
    Fiume Z. Final report on the safety assessment of lecithin and hydrogenated lecithin. Int J Toxicol, 2001, 20, Suppl 1, 21-45.
    Gelbmann CM, Muller WE. Chronic treatment with phosphatidylserine restores muscarinic cholinergic receptor deficits in the aged mouse brain. Neurobiol Aging, 1992, 3, 1, 45-50.
    Crook TH, Tinklenberg J et al. Effects of phyosphatidylserine in age-associated memory impairment. Neurology, 1991, 41, 5, 644-699.
    Crook T, Petrie W et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine in Alzheimer’s disease. Psychopharmacol Bull, 1992, 28, 1, 61-66.
    Monteleone P, Beinat L et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine on the neuroendocrine respone to physical stress in humans. Neuroendocrinology, 1990, 52, 3, 243-248.
    Sakai M, Yamatoya H, Kudo S. Pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine enzymatically synthesized from soybean lecithin on brain function in rodents. J. Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo), 1996, 42, 1, 47-54.
    Enig, Mary. Know Your Fats (Silver Spring, MD, Bethesda Press, 2000), 60-61.
    Blokland A, Honig W, et al. Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutr, 1999, 15, 10, 778-783.
    Schreiber S, Kampf-Sherf O et al. An open trial of plant-source derived phosphatydilserine for treatment of age-related cognitive decline. Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci, 2000, 37, 4, 302-307.
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    Blaylock, Ralph. Not just another scare: toxin additives in your food and drink. Radiant Life International Health Related Articles. www.radiantlife.com.
    Ripening agent made from soy granted EPA approval. Nutra-Park Inc., Madison, WI. Business wire via NewsEdge Corporation posted 4/4/2002 on www.soyatech.com.

This may be more hype than anything else but it does make you want to check carefully your source for lecithin and the source materials they use.
The only thing that seems to offer a way out is simply to observe the phenomena and compare the perceptions with a lot of other folks and try to narrow down the "constant" that is present in all of them.  In this way, we can have a closer idea of what the Third Man REALLY is, and what he is REALLY doing, and what then, should be our best response.  And, of course, "observing phenomena" means, in its most literal sense, to gain and gather knowledge of every form and sort so that one has a sufficient database from which to draw conclusions about observations of one's environment.

                                                                                                                                                                                 Laura Knight-Jadczyk