Author Topic: Uterine Fibroids  (Read 1739 times)

Offline aleana

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Uterine Fibroids
« on: March 04, 2014, 04:26:43 AM »
My daughter (who is in her early 40's) has uterine fibroids. She has been attempting to control them with diet and supplements from doing online research although the suggestions are often conflicting and confusing. She has been able to lose 1.5 inches around her stomach from changing her diet, although it has now levelled off.  Today she had an appointment with a specialist to discuss her options. It is apparent that surgery is necessary because they are everywhere, including the uterine muscle. The doctor wants to perform a myomectomy, but said she could not guarantee that they would not grow back and that there is a possibility that she may need a hysterectomy in the future.

She is taking things one step at a time right now and has given me permission to ask for help and suggestions. She has been gluten and dairy–free for some time, but still eats other grains (corn, etc.). She eats vegetables (particularly cruciferous veggies) but cannot eat a lot of meat without problems – the only things that do not cause issues are chicken and salmon. She is taking some supplements including zinc, Omega-3’s, Vitamin D, Turmeric and something called DIM (diindolyimethane) which is a hormone balancer.  She occasionally takes B vitamins, milk thistle, vitamin C and magnesium but not on a regular basis.

After today’s visit with the doctor she was told that there is no way to avoid surgery at this point.  The surgery will probably be scheduled for next month.  That said, she would like to know if there is anything that she can change in her diet or supplementation program to improve things – even if they shrink minimally so as to help to make the surgery less invasive. Also going forward it would be good to lessen the likelihood of the fibroids growing back and requiring a hysterectomy later.

I do have a FIR blanket if detoxing would help, but have not wanted to suggest it because I don’t know if this is contraindicated for this condition.

We appreciate any help or suggestions – this has hit hard emotionally as she was trying desperately to improve with diet and supplements without really knowing what works. She has not really been open to the Paleo/Keto diet because she cannot tolerate a lot of meat and fat - so other changes will have to occur I think before that is an option, if ever.

Thanks so much for any help.


Offline Gaby

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2014, 05:03:05 AM »
I would look into improving the diet ASAP. If she is eating corn, she is not gluten free... Another thing I would try is progesterone cream. There are folks who had their fibroids and/or polyps shrink by over half their size when they got treatment with progesterone cream. It comes with suggested doses, but here is a protocol I synthesized fwiw:

Quote
For severe PMS problems, adrenal fatigue, very irregular cycles such as heavy bleeding or light bleeding, uterine fibroids, fibrocystic breasts, polyps, premenstrual migraines, peri or menopausal symptoms. Please note that most issues stabilize on the diet and by minimizing toxicity, since a high carb diet and xenoestrogens (BPA, phtalates, pesticides) are at the root.

Low dose progesterone therapy which was pioneered by Dr. John R. Lee. You can check the website (Johnleemd.com) for a list of reliable creams.  The protocol is as follows:

- Pre-menopause or PMS problems:  from day 12 to day 26: 1/4 to 1/2 of a teaspoon once or twice per day. {if you don't know when your menstruation is starting, then stop it on the first day of bleeding and re-start around day 14}

- Menopause and post-menopause: 24 to 26 days a month, 1/4 to 1/2 of teaspoon once or twice per day. It is important to have some days off as some spotting may occur (if this happens, use the PMS/Pre-menopause schedule and after 3 to 4 months of no spotting, you can resume the post-menopause schedule).

After ovulation on day 14 (that is, if we ovulate) we are supposed to produce around 20 to 30 mg of progesterone per day. The progesterone cream is usually a 2% natural progesterone, so 1/4 gives around 20mg per day. A normal low progesterone dose is of 20-60mg/day (100mg per day maximum).

You can use progesterone cream for about 2 to 3 months for experimenting purposes and then take a break or stop using it.

More info here:     

FAQ's About Progesterone Cream
_http://www.johnleemd.com/store/faqs_progest_crm.html

Progesterone Cream
Health Benefits, Uses, Side Effects & Tips
_http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/Progesterone-Cream.htm

Here is some relevant information regarding progesterone cream and polyps:

_http://www.hormone-imbalance-solutions.com/treatment-for-uterine-polyps.html

   
Quote
Treatment For Uterine Polyps

    Uterine Polyps are also called endometrial polyps and are growths on the inner wall of the uterus. These polyps can range from the size of a tiny seed to larger than a golf ball. They can be attached to the uterine wall by a large base or a thin cord. A polyp is an overgrowth of tissue in the lining (endometrium) of the uterus.

    It is similar to a skin tag – normal tissue, but growing in an abnormal way. Small polyps usually don’t have any noticeable effect but larger ones can cause infertility or risk of miscarriage.

    You can have one or many uterine polyps. They usually stay within the uterus, but sometimes may slip down through the cervix (opening of the uterus) into the vagina. Although they can happen earlier, polyps most commonly occur in women in their 40s and 50s.

    Usually  they cause no symptoms, but occasionally bleed, causing pain and cramping.

    Symptoms of polyps can be:

        Irregular menstrual bleeding – unpredictable periods of varying length and amount
        Bleeding between regular menstrual periods
        Excessively heavy menstrual periods
        Vaginal bleeding after menopause
        Infertility

    During your monthly cycle, the endometrial lining of the uterus begins to build up, in preparation for an embryo (fertilized egg). If no embryo is implanted, the lining is shed (menstruation).

    Sometimes this endometrial lining grows too much, causing tiny clumps to form protruding from the mucous lining of the uterus. These clumps are uterine polyps, small growths that many times are symptoms of hormonal imbalance and should be corrected with natural hormones.

    Many women have an excess of estrogen and sometimes also a shortage of testosterone causing their menopausal or PMS symptoms. Uterine polyps and uterine fibroid tumors are also signs of a hormonal imbalance. Many times, instead of surgery, correcting hormonal imbalance could correct the problems naturally. Excess estrogen is also the only known cause of endometrial cancer and hormonal balancing could stop it dead.
    Natural Progesterone is Good Health Insurance

    Every woman who lives in an industrialized country  is at a high risk of estrogen dominance because of exposure to xenoestrogens.  Xeno-estrogens, which are usually petroleum based synthetic estrogens, are present in huge amounts in our food chain, water supply and our environment.

    These synthetic hormones react like too much estrogen in the body causing all kinds of problems. These synthetic hormones are also the reason for girls reaching puberty at a much younger age than a generation or two ago.

    For this reason, every female past puberty living in an industrialized country should consider supplementation with a natural progesterone cream formula since excess estrogen is balanced by natural progesterone.  This hormonal imbalance can cause many problems in the reproductive system, including polyps.

    Also, be aware that it is usually the synthetic hormones in our food and environment causing this so, if your doctor wants to give you a prescription for more synthetic estrogen type hormones — you should think about it very carefully.

    Natural progesterone is the only way to balance excess estrogen without side effects. Natural progesterone is what the body uses to balance excess estrogen when things are working properly.

    However, with the havoc the synthetic estrogens inflict on your body, you don’t have enough progesterone to balance things properly, so taking a 100% natural progesterone cream can work wonders for you and adding a testosterone balancing formula will help eliminate signs of hormonal balance and eliminate all kinds of female problems including uterine polyps.
   
You can find a list of reliable progesterone cream brands at _http://www.johnleemd.com/store/resource_progesterone.html

Good resources for the diet include Mark Sisson's "Primal Blue Print". It has not only research, but guidelines as well. Another good one is "The Paleo Solution" by Robb Wolf and "Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas which is an all time favorite due to its comprehensive approach.

Added: Here is another relevant article that talks about the estrogen dominance issues in fibroids and how to counteract them with progesterone cream:

Fibroids

_http://www.drlam.com/opinion/firboids.asp

I think further dietary improvements will help a lot too. Hope this helps :)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 05:11:28 AM by Gaby »
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Hildegarda

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2014, 05:36:37 AM »
Sorry to hear this, aleana.  Fibroids run in my family, so I have always kept an eye out for information about treating or preventing them.  The diet and supplementation aim to lower estrogen in the body.  Sounds like your daughter is already doing most of the things that are currently recommended, in particular, cruciferous veggies and DIM. 

I want to quote Dr. Christiane Northrup, whose holistic tips on women's health have been very helpful to me in the past.  She has a book called "Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom" that is great, and this is basically the book's chapter on fibroids:

http://www.drnorthrup.com/womenshealth/healthcenter/topic_details.php?topic_id=64

What she said about soy should be disregarded of course, she has changed her stance since, I believe.  Most of her recommendations are in line with what your daughter has been doing and what has been suggested already.  Something else to consider is the emotional aspect of having fibroids, which seems very accurate to me when I apply it to my personal and family history:

Quote
The baseline energetic patterns that result in fibroids are related to blockage and stagnation of the energy of the second emotional center. Caroline Myss, Ph.D., teaches that fibroid tumors represent our creativity that has never been birthed. Fibroids may also result when we are flowing life energy into dead end jobs or relationships we have outgrown. Fibroids are often associated with conflicts about creativity, reproduction, and relationships.

If you have fibroids, ask yourself the following questions: What are the creations within me that I want to put out in the world before I’m no longer here? If anything at all were possible, what would my life look like? If I had six months to live, what relationships would I release from my life immediately? What relationships would I give more of my time and attention to? What relationships truly feed and nourish me? Which ones drain my energy? Write your answers in a journal. Discuss them with supportive friends. Deep within you, you have all the answers you need. You just need to be open to hearing them.

In a book, she goes into more details and says that the emotional pattern here is when someone is mistreated and drained by the world, but blames herself, internalizing anger and sadness.  I think there's a lot to it.  I have followed her other protocol for a similar issue, an mid-size ovarian cyst.  I don't rule out that it was a coincidence, but the cyst did disappear within 2 weeks from acknowledging the respective pattern, feeling it through and chugging down some herbs.  That was confirmed by imaging tests.   It was also deeply satisfying as a process. 

The other point she makes, and I also agree with, is that the fibroids do not necessarily have to be removed.  Medical profession today is really keen on chopping off body parts, but it may not have intrinsic value.  In this case, if fibroids do not cause any symptoms (back pain, bleeding), if pregnancy is not in the plans, and if self-esteem from an appearance etc. is not at stake, then why not just let them be.  In menopause, when hormone levels drop, they do shrink.  My mother and my grandmother both got hysterectomies in their 40s or 50s, but my great-grandmother didn't, and she lived to the ripe old age of 94 with her fibroids intact.  My mother's older friend didn't want to remove her large fibroid out of principle.  She looked 8 months pregnant ever since I remember her, that's almost 40 years now.  Whether that was a good choice or not, she is in her late 70s now, and otherwise in good health.  She had bleeding issues but not after menopause.  So that's just something to think about as well. 
Hildegarda

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Offline Forrestdeva

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 05:38:16 AM »
I had fibroids a few years back and saw a few specialist and a Holistic Dr. I was told by all of them that you can not slather enough Progesterone cream on you to do anything effective. I did how ever take a monthly shot that is given to men with enlarged prostrate. It did shrink down the tumors and by the time I hit natural menopause the tumors shrunk and dissipated and were gone.   Now I had multiple fibroids and one had grown through my uterus, but now they are all gone. I did have to have monthly hormone shots for a few years to keep everything in balance. Keeping all of my body parts  ;D I did some research and found what not to eat, mainly not to consume estrophyllic foods (estrogen producing).   

Offline aleana

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 05:45:09 AM »
Thanks Gaby - I sent a copy of this to her. 

I am familiar with Dr. Lee and have read his book on progesterone. I recommended that she try it a couple of years ago, and she did purchase some but only took one container and then stopped. Actually I was not 100% certain that it was OK for her to continue as I really did not have enough info at the time - so did not push it.  I will read the links as well and we will find one of the recommended creams.

Am not sure what her Dr. will say and if she will contradict this - she is mainstream I am sure. My daughter's only "insurance" is with a group here for musicians, so she is really restricted on who she can see.  Do you think she should try to postpone the surgery while attempting more with the diet, supplements and the progesterone, or just go ahead with it at this point since they are so far advanced? And - continue improving the diet and the supplementation of course!

Thank you!!

Offline aleana

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2014, 06:06:03 AM »

Quote
The baseline energetic patterns that result in fibroids are related to blockage and stagnation of the energy of the second emotional center. Caroline Myss, Ph.D., teaches that fibroid tumors represent our creativity that has never been birthed. Fibroids may also result when we are flowing life energy into dead end jobs or relationships we have outgrown. Fibroids are often associated with conflicts about creativity, reproduction, and relationships.

If you have fibroids, ask yourself the following questions: What are the creations within me that I want to put out in the world before I’m no longer here? If anything at all were possible, what would my life look like? If I had six months to live, what relationships would I release from my life immediately? What relationships would I give more of my time and attention to? What relationships truly feed and nourish me? Which ones drain my energy? Write your answers in a journal. Discuss them with supportive friends. Deep within you, you have all the answers you need. You just need to be open to hearing them.

In a book, she goes into more details and says that the emotional pattern here is when someone is mistreated and drained by the world, but blames herself, internalizing anger and sadness.  I think there's a lot to it.  I have followed her other protocol for a similar issue, an mid-size ovarian cyst.  I don't rule out that it was a coincidence, but the cyst did disappear within 2 weeks from acknowledging the respective pattern, feeling it through and chugging down some herbs.  That was confirmed by imaging tests.   It was also deeply satisfying as a process. 

Interesting that you brought this up. We were discussing the emotional component of this earlier and how that may be adding to the problem or be at the base of it - in addition of course to the ever-present synthetic estrogens in the environment. I think she will be very open to reading the book and it might help some emotions to surface.

Quote

The other point she makes, and I also agree with, is that the fibroids do not necessarily have to be removed.  Medical profession today is really keen on chopping off body parts, but it may not have intrinsic value.  In this case, if fibroids do not cause any symptoms (back pain, bleeding), if pregnancy is not in the plans, and if self-esteem from an appearance etc. is not at stake, then why not just let them be.  In menopause, when hormone levels drop, they do shrink.  My mother and my grandmother both got hysterectomies in their 40s or 50s, but my great-grandmother didn't, and she lived to the ripe old age of 94 with her fibroids intact.  My mother's older friend didn't want to remove her large fibroid out of principle.  She looked 8 months pregnant ever since I remember her, that's almost 40 years now.  Whether that was a good choice or not, she is in her late 70s now, and otherwise in good health.  She had bleeding issues but not after menopause.  So that's just something to think about as well.

That was the thing that kept her hoping she could work with diet and supplements alone, but since they have grown so much in the past few years, it has frightened her and of course the doctors just want to cut things out - it's hard to contradict them because it does seem frightening - especially when they suggest there "might" be cancer (without any real evidence). In this case it does not appear so - but the doctor did mention that it could be possible - and she would not know until she did a biopsy. Nothing like that to scare the daylights out of someone.  Ugh! And of course my daughter is so ready to put this behind her and just be done with them.

I did how ever take a monthly shot that is given to men with enlarged prostrate. It did shrink down the tumors and by the time I hit natural menopause the tumors shrunk and dissipated and were gone.   Now I had multiple fibroids and one had grown through my uterus, but now they are all gone. 
Do you remember what shots you were given?  I am wondering why many doctors don't even consider these options (well actually I do know - they would rather cut!)l :huh:

We will do the research and keep trying - she may end up capitulating to surgery at this point, but I will keep everyone posted on progress. I really hope this does not have to happen.

Thanks everyone for your suggestions!




Offline Gaby

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2014, 06:28:43 AM »
Am not sure what her Dr. will say and if she will contradict this - she is mainstream I am sure. My daughter's only "insurance" is with a group here for musicians, so she is really restricted on who she can see.  Do you think she should try to postpone the surgery while attempting more with the diet, supplements and the progesterone, or just go ahead with it at this point since they are so far advanced? And - continue improving the diet and the supplementation of course!

Thank you!!

A mainstream doctor might contradict the advise, but the data that they rely on is not of "low dose progesterone". They don't dominate the subject of estrogen dominance either.

That last article I quoted summarizes the surgical options too. Perhaps she can read the material for inspiration, including Dr. Lee's book. If she takes the diet seriously and takes proper care, the surgery could be postponed. That option could still be there if the fibroids don't shrink.

My 2 cents!
To love is to seek knowledge of the beloved. To know is to love. "For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known. And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love." 1 Corinthians 13:12-13. [Through a Glass Darkly: Hidden Masters, Secret Agendas and a Tradition Unveiled (The Wave or Adventures with Cassiopaea, Volume 4)]

Offline Weller

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2014, 07:56:36 AM »
Hi Aleana - just wanted to weigh in as I was in the same situation as your daughter...and opted to go ahead with surgery after a lot of tortured soul-searching.  I tried the diet stuff, the progesterone creams, reading Myss and Northrup, journaling about blocked creative energies, etc etc.  Years of putting off surgery and watching them grow and grow.  I think these solutions may work when you are in your 20's and 30's and you still have time to turn things around.  Past a certain point, these fixes are too little too late.

I come from women on both sides of the family with reproductive system problems and unhappy lives, and I think this played a role; I couldn't escape generations of dysfunctional mothering and dysfunctional reproductive systems.  Had I known that I needed to be much more proactive when I was much younger, maybe it would have been different.  Ultimately, the impact on my lifestyle (anemia, brain fog and fatigue, 25% of my month spent in near-incapacitation) wore me down.

My doc kept saying I'd be more 'comfortable' after surgery; I was offended by this patronizing attitude and felt I was giving in to the western medical juggernaut, but relented. Putting a stop to such a 'cramped' lifestyle won out over all else and I opted for the myomectomy. 

In the months prior to surgery I was careful to exercise and eat right to make recovery easier (no booze, no coffee, no sugar, no wheat). It was a tough recovery that took a couple months to get back to normal (it is harder to recover from a major myomectomy than a hysterectomy, because your swiss-cheesed uterus has to knit itself back together). I lost four pants sizes overnight but couldn't sit down or get out of bed by myself for a week.  Afterwards, I was determined to make the changes to prevent going through THAT again.  But soon the discomfort totally disappeared, I had become so used to decades of pain and inconvenience that I had lost all memory of what it was like to be without it.

This was what it took to make the commitment to change that I should have made 20 years earlier.  From what I came to learn about my body at least, is that it is more about controlling estrogen levels than balancing progesterone. This means bigger fixes like limiting alcohol consumption, and increasing exercise above what others might consider normal - lifting weights, and moderate to heavy cardio to bring estrogen down, and keeping body fat levels down. It also meant keeping good digestive health, since if estrogen is not eliminated via normal gut emptying, it gets reabsorbed.  One source I read talked about how women with fibroids tend not to be very regular; the idea that gut health would be tied to female hormone balance surprised me.  I also started taking iodine supplements a few years after surgery, which the jury is still out on but it seemed to help, the fibroids shrunk, which had initially returned in the year after surgery.  There is some research suggesting that women with these problems need more iodine.  I am still not sure of the efficacy of this, but so far so good.  My recent checkups confirmed that there would be no need for further myomectomies or a hysterectomy from here on out with only a little while to go before menopause, knock wood!

Anyway, good luck to your daughter, whatever she decides to do!  I hope my experience can help in some way.  At this late phase it is not an easy decision to opt for surgery, but it is not easy to skip it either.

Offline Weller

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2014, 02:02:00 AM »
I hope I didn’t overstep in my last post on this thread, the lack of a response made me wonder, but after Aleana’s post on the Patrick Rodriguez spirit release thread I am intrigued about fibroids as a symbol of matrilineal issues.  This really resonated from that thread, where Aleana said,

Quote
…my mother never wanted any of us to get married and have children. She wanted us to pursue careers because she felt marriage and children was a trap. Maybe that was handed down from my grandmother, but I always thought it was a response to her getting married so young and never being able to pursue any of her talents or do what she wanted. SHE felt trapped.

This describes my own grandmother to a T.  She resented being forced to be a wife and mother early on, and was all about women moving into the workaday world, Rosie-the-Riveter, post-WWII.  She left the kids at home with grandma, got a college degree and a job in banking when most women were home baking cookies and polishing the silver.  Perhaps a courageous move, but ultimately the tradeoff was she wasn't really a mother, this move had emotional costs for her kids.

Also this:
Quote
They then worked to remove the shards of my grandmother – he asked to have ALL her shards return home to her from her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren. Patrick asked how that worked and she said that she understands but does not want to let go. She asked me this is what I thought was best and I assured her that I would always love her but wanted her to be able to continue on her journey and be whole.

Could fibroids in the granddaughter be evidence of these “shards,” how do some of these (failed) spiritual resolutions in earlier generations manifest physically in later generations?  My own mother has been mostly unable to face how her mother’s cantankerousness has shaped her; instead the focus of resentments are on her father’s abuse, and most interestingly, transferred to difficult women in her husband’s family, not her own.  I think this denial of distorted mothering has costs that ripple out generations.

My own frustration in dealing with fibroids (i.e., nothing ‘nutraceutical’ or spirit-worky was effective until AFTER surgery, despite a decade of trying) brought home how important it was to resolve issues of prior (female) generations, whether biochemical or spiritual…but I had a profound feeling of hopelessness:  if I didn’t know the abuse perpetrated on my long-dead grandmothers (and indirectly, my mother or father), how the heck could I resolve a physical manifestation in my body, two generations later?  Ultimately I decided that recognizing that matrilineal abuse simply happened was a step in the right direction, even if I might never know the specifics. So it’s interesting and fulfilling to see this play out in a spirit release sphere for you, even if just vicariously.

Also interesting how oxytocin seems to have a protective effect against fibroids, and this is the “bonding hormone,” facilitating maternal connection, anxiety reduction and social recognition (and uh, orgasm).  Could lack of oxytocin be a biochemical symbol of maternal rejection, or of other types of female/familial rejection in the family line, with physical manifestations like fibroids?  With what you have recently gone through with Patrick, are you producing more oxytocin now, or will your daughter, through your altered behavior toward her or her own change in understanding? Interesting stuff.  I wonder if we may be headed toward a broader understanding of the connections between hormones/endocrine function and spiritual “health.”

Offline Shijing

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2014, 04:47:06 AM »
Hi aleana,

Since I've been doing research on MTHFR mutations, I just wanted to mention that uterine fibroids can be one indication of them. You can read about it and check for other possible symptoms here:

http://journeyofhealth.org/hello-world/

http://www.spectracell.com/media/uploaded/d/0e2043775_dr-briggs-mthfr-presentation-slides.pdf

Also, using the keywords "MTHFR" and "fibroids" will bring up other links that may be useful. If your daughter tested positive for this, it would be important that she stop taking any folic acid and switch to methyl-folate instead. It would also be good for her to find a doctor who's educated about this and could provide additional guidance for nutritional therapy.

Hope this gives you a lead  :)
« Last Edit: March 21, 2014, 05:12:39 AM by Shijing »
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Offline aleana

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2014, 11:59:02 PM »
I hope I didn’t overstep in my last post on this thread, the lack of a response made me wonder, but after Aleana’s post on the Patrick Rodriguez spirit release thread I am intrigued about fibroids as a symbol of matrilineal issues.  This really resonated from that thread, where Aleana said,

Quote
…my mother never wanted any of us to get married and have children. She wanted us to pursue careers because she felt marriage and children was a trap. Maybe that was handed down from my grandmother, but I always thought it was a response to her getting married so young and never being able to pursue any of her talents or do what she wanted. SHE felt trapped.

This describes my own grandmother to a T.  She resented being forced to be a wife and mother early on, and was all about women moving into the workaday world, Rosie-the-Riveter, post-WWII.  She left the kids at home with grandma, got a college degree and a job in banking when most women were home baking cookies and polishing the silver.  Perhaps a courageous move, but ultimately the tradeoff was she wasn't really a mother, this move had emotional costs for her kids.

Also this:
Quote
They then worked to remove the shards of my grandmother – he asked to have ALL her shards return home to her from her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren. Patrick asked how that worked and she said that she understands but does not want to let go. She asked me this is what I thought was best and I assured her that I would always love her but wanted her to be able to continue on her journey and be whole.

Could fibroids in the granddaughter be evidence of these “shards,” how do some of these (failed) spiritual resolutions in earlier generations manifest physically in later generations?  My own mother has been mostly unable to face how her mother’s cantankerousness has shaped her; instead the focus of resentments are on her father’s abuse, and most interestingly, transferred to difficult women in her husband’s family, not her own.  I think this denial of distorted mothering has costs that ripple out generations.[..]

Also interesting how oxytocin seems to have a protective effect against fibroids, and this is the “bonding hormone,” facilitating maternal connection, anxiety reduction and social recognition (and uh, orgasm).  Could lack of oxytocin be a biochemical symbol of maternal rejection, or of other types of female/familial rejection in the family line, with physical manifestations like fibroids?  With what you have recently gone through with Patrick, are you producing more oxytocin now, or will your daughter, through your altered behavior toward her or her own change in understanding? Interesting stuff.  I wonder if we may be headed toward a broader understanding of the connections between hormones/endocrine function and spiritual “health.”

Weller - I am sorry I did not respond in a timely manner. My session with Patrick was the day after your post, and within a few day of my original posting my daughter had an appt. with a doctor who is going to try to remove the fibroids with laparascopic surgery.  We are hoping for the best.  In the meantime she is using progesterone and working more diligently with the diet.

I talked with her immediately after the session with Patrick because I too saw a connection between the shards and the long-term consequences of this multi-generational behavior. She thought it was highly significant as well and is looking for evidence of change with this and the changes in diet/ supplements. The surgery probably won't take place for a month so we have some time to see what transpires. If they just shrink a bit and make the surgery less intrusive, that itself will be a huge gift.

You know the good thing about your grandmother going out and living her dream is that she was not frustrated and angry. She may not have been a great "mother" figure for her children - but as I lived the opposite side of that and had my Mom at home cooking, etc. but miserable the whole time, I am not sure which is worse! :huh: There is definitely a trade-off.

Regarding your mother's denial of distorted mothering - I cannot tell you how long it took me to even peer beyond that door. :( I had a therapist (who was also an astrologer) tell me that both my mother and grandmother were nasty women.  :P I was in such denial and just the thought of dealing with what that meant was too much at the time. I lived very much in their shadow and it took many more years before I could address it - then it was step by step. It's huge, at least it was for me, so I can well understand that your mother would prefer to lay blame elsewhere. I really don't know why this is so difficult.

Interesting question about oxytocin - especially in light of difficulty in bonding with my mother. My daughter's upbringing was totally different, so I don't know how it is for her. So many changes are following from the session - and am sure on many levels that I am only barely aware of now.

 
Hi aleana,

Since I've been doing research on MTHFR mutations, I just wanted to mention that uterine fibroids can be one indication of them. You can read about it and check for other possible symptoms here:

http://journeyofhealth.org/hello-world/

http://www.spectracell.com/media/uploaded/d/0e2043775_dr-briggs-mthfr-presentation-slides.pdf

Also, using the keywords "MTHFR" and "fibroids" will bring up other links that may be useful. [...]

Hope this gives you a lead  :)
Thank you -Shijing - I had never heard of that connection - will look up the links. I am not sure what supplements she is taking - but will check on that.

Offline Weller

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2014, 03:11:30 AM »
Just an odd and probably off-color and off-topic observation that the acronym MTHFR brought another word association to my mind.  Wacky in the context of diseases/spiritual distortions passed down, in the matrilineal sense. 

That this is such a powerful slang term in our culture DOES say a lot about unresolved mothering issues, and how (patriarchic) culture distorts women's role/power, leaving at least some women in irreconcilable situations (as the above posts refer to).  I can't see this term having nearly as much power in a matriarchal culture, i.e. it would be slang in the sense of a loserly "momma's boy" instead of some abominable sexual abuser/rapist.

From urbandictionary.com:

Quote
...actually dating waaaay the hell back to the 1300's when it was considered the highest sin to sleep with ones own mother. (Even above murder.) It can mean precisely as it sounds, one who has sex mothers, but it was originally meant as "one who has sex with their own mother". It is most of the time used without meaning, just to be said in a sentence, it can mean absolutely nothing and absolutely everything its meant to at the same time.

This abomination, considered in a non-sexual way: "sleeping with one's own mother" in a psychological-spiritual sense is something that anyone with unresolved mothering issues is doing emotionally or subconsciously when child or mother (dead or alive) will not let go.  The slang is getting at it through a more violent/sexual male lens: getting back at mom's inevitable passive-aggression with sexual/physical power.  Daughters don't have this as an option, we turn inward and get fibroids and PCOS and endometriosis instead... :rolleyes:

Offline Arwenn

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2014, 07:35:46 AM »
I hope I didn’t overstep in my last post on this thread, the lack of a response made me wonder, but after Aleana’s post on the Patrick Rodriguez spirit release thread I am intrigued about fibroids as a symbol of matrilineal issues.

The study of epigenetics and transmission of the stress response across generations is truly fascinating. There is a thread about it here. It is very interesting to see how Patrick's work ties in with trans-generational and past-life health related issues. Modern medicine with its mechanistic (vs wholistic) approach can really miss the mark sometimes. One almost needs a shaman to  intuit what the problem really is.

'FORGET "I should", forget it all. Replace it by "I LOVE TO DO ...." and skip completely the TIME issue. If you need five lives to accomplish what you WANT, let this be the first of those five. And then, without any "time obligation" or "should stressing" - start it.  First step first. And ENJOY it. And LOVE yourself - take care of yourself.
This is the only thing that the Universe (God?) wants from you, I think.'  Arkadiusz Jadczyk

Offline aleana

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2014, 04:56:36 AM »
I just wanted to post an update. My daughter decided to go ahead with the surgery and it was done last week. She really appreciated all the helpful suggestions and worked diligently with the progesterone cream, supplements and also read Christiane Northrup's book.

After further consultations with another doctor and an MRI it was pretty clear that surgery was necessary. She found a group of the most wonderful and caring doctors and was able to have the surgery done robotically. It was a long and intense procedure - it took over 5 hours because they removed large 12 fibroids. Thankfully, Horseofadifferentcolor was there with me during the process to keep me calm and take me out for cigarette breaks!  Don't know how I would have managed without her support.  :hug2: We originally thought it was only going to take 2-3 hours, so by the 4th hour I was about to climb the walls. The nurses did call periodically from the OR to give updates - but sheesh it was stressful!

However, she is recovering well and the pain has been minimal - she is already reducing the medication.  She did need a couple of units of blood during the surgery and I bought her some strong B12 tablets to help rebuild.  She is still really tired but is sleeping a lot and is moving around fairly well. 

We are both really happy this is behind her - she is looking better and getting stronger every day!

Offline Lilou

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Re: Uterine Fibroids
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2014, 05:05:44 AM »
Thanks for the update, aleana.  I'm happy to hear your daughter is on the road to recovery and that you had horseofadifferentcolor there with you for support.  That was very kind of her.   :hug:
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