6.5 Earthquake hits dead centre on Yellowstone caldera.

MusicMan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Dutchsinse, bless him, has reported on a 6.5 magnitude Earthquake that was centred on Yellowstone caldera. This was following a 7.5 on the Pacific Northwest. This leaves a zone near Alaska that is at risk, and the North American craton is going to see some movement around Colorado, Oklahoma, and the New Madrid fault, and further North from there. He noted that Yellowstone has not seen significant movement like this for a number of years. Considering that it is a Supervolcano and the caldera is the size of SEVEN Grand Canyons, people in the area ought to take note.
 

itellsya

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Dutchsinse, bless him, has reported on a 6.5 magnitude Earthquake that was centred on Yellowstone caldera. This was following a 7.5 on the Pacific Northwest. This leaves a zone near Alaska that is at risk, and the North American craton is going to see some movement around Colorado, Oklahoma, and the New Madrid fault, and further North from there. He noted that Yellowstone has not seen significant movement like this for a number of years. Considering that it is a Supervolcano and the caldera is the size of SEVEN Grand Canyons, people in the area ought to take note.

Although i do think Dutchsinse has brought to light some notable info, like quakes and fracking, i am still a little wary of him. Maybe that he can try to hype things up a bit too much? Anyway, so i checked out the USGS info on the quake and then tracked it to Yellowstone caldera with google maps and got the following:
USGS info:
M 6.5 - 72km W of Challis, Idaho
Time2020-03-31 23:52:31 (UTC)Location44.448°N 115.136°WDepth10.0 km


1585741054913.png

Added: USGS has their own map, obviously :rolleyes: :
1585742073689.png

So at least according to the above - and i may be wrong - it may not be 'centered' on Yellowstone, which is what i would understand from 'centered'. but perhaps seismically speaking it is pretty close.

It is also true that Yellowstone has been unusually active of late, so i don't doubt that this is worth documenting.

It's up on SOTT and there it states that the last quake of this magnitude was in 1983: M6.5 earthquake strikes in Idaho, largest in the state since 1983 -- Sott.net
 
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Cleo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
A family member who lives near the Oregon/Idaho border felt this earthquake yesterday. I believe they live less than 200 miles from where the earthquake hit in Idaho.

They were sitting at home in their rocking chair at the time so quite the jolt I think (they said the shaking lasted for around 20 seconds)
 

bltay

Padawan Learner
Itellsya you are absolutely correct. The epicenter of this earthquake was approximately 250 miles west of Yellowstone Park in Idaho. There were no known effects of the earthquake in Yellowstone, although the Park is closed at this time and cannot be fully observed and evaluated. I am still constantly amazed at the hype that occurs any time an earthquake occurs anywhere around Yellowstone Park. In 1959 a M7.5 earthquake occurred just a couple of miles outside the Park. In June, 1975, a M6.1 earthquake occurred inside the park at the northern caldera boundary near Norris Geyser Basin. In 1983 the Borah Peak M6.9 quake in Idaho occurred not far from the latest quake in Challis. Amazingly not one of these extremely strong earthquakes caused Yellowstone to erupt. In addition there was no evidence or indications that conditions in Yellowstone were moving toward an eruption. It is impossible to list all of the earthquakes that constantly take place in Yellowstone, and every time there is a quake or a swarm, some fearmongerer writes that Yellowstone is 'waking up' or 'activity is increasing' in Yellowstone, and they always ask the question: Is this a precursor to the great supereruption? They never say that it is a precursor, because the earthquake history has shown that there is no relationship between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

An example of the type of fearmongering that goes on can be seen in this article of SOTT:
'Pulsing' of Yellowstone volcano is increasing due to trapped magma below

Stacy Liberatore
Daily Mail
Fri, 20 Mar 2020 14:22 UTC



The title of the article is misleading because there is no way to know if the pulsing is increasing. Scientists did not even know about the supervolcano until its discovery by satellite. Recent studies of the ground deformation are also satellite based, therefore all deformation data is very new. For all these scientists 'know' this deformation has been going on for millennia. The recent rising of ground around Steamboat in Norris Geyser Basin stopped in 1918 and has subsided back to its previous position. Who knows whether this area has been even higher or lower than recent observations show.

Those who did this latest study about the land rising and falling say it may explain Steamboat's latest activity. Yet Steamboat has erupted when the ground rose and has continued since it subsided.

To me, the really sad part are the comments interjected by the SOTT Commenter. The first one states:

"It may be that it's snowing more often in Yellowstone than ever before and that there's an uptick in activity overall."

It may??? be that it's snowing more often? Where are there any facts or data to back this up? Also "... there's an uptick in activity overall."??? What exactly is an uptick? If he/she is saying there is an increase in activity in Yellowstone. where is the proof? What kind of activity is the Commenter referring to? Now in my opinion this is an open ended unsupported statement that leaves one believing there is some kind of activity in Yellowstone Park that is increasing, and everyone should be concerned about it because it might show that Yellowstone might be on the verge of a supereruption. Now this will be denied because it was not stated outright, but to me the implications are clear.

SOTT's next comment is just plain wrong. It states:

"With 32 eruptions of Steamboat Geyser in 2018 and 47 in 2019 it would appear that the rate of these eruptions is increasing significantly."

Steamboat began it latest series of eruptions in March 2018. In March 2018 it erupted once, and and April 2018 it erupted twice. That leaves 29 eruptions in 7 months of 2018, or 4.1 eruptions per month. In 2019 47 eruptions per 12 months would be 3.9 eruptions per month. In 2020 through March there have been 9 eruptions, or 3 eruptions per month. The rate of Steamboat's eruptions are definitely NOT increasing during this series of eruptions.

The next SOTT comment:

"Didn't they just say that meltwater was causing the geysers to erupt??"

is in response to a statement that NASA proposed a project to pump water 6 miles beneath the earth's surface to the magma chamber to cool it. Previously the article did state that snowmelt helped increase the geyser activity. This snowmelt water goes into the porous rhyolite surface rock several hundred feet below the surface and supplies the thermal features with water. It does not come anywhere close to going 6 miles into the ground to the magma chamber. Geysers are a close to surface phenomenon. Therefore, once again, IMO SOTT needs to check their facts more closely before commenting.

Does SOTT's final comment:

"So despite the assurances from scientists it would appear that activity at Yellowstone is increasing"

provide more evidence that there is an agenda behind the nonfactual based comments it has been making? SOTT cannot show that "... activity in Yellowstone is increasing." There is no evidence that earthquake activity is increasing. There is no evidence that the rising and/or subsiding of the ground is increasing. There is no evidence that geyser activity is increasing. It is true that Steamboat's activity has increased over the last 2 years, but one must take in the complete picture before making any judgments. In the summer of 2018 Giant, Morning, and Fan & Mortar Geysers all came out of dormancy and began erupting. These are all some of the largest geysers in the park. (I am surprised there were no fearmongering articles about this, but it appears Steamboat stole the show in 2018.) However, by 2019 they had all gone dormant again. Over the past several years, other significant performers such as Plume Geyser, Sawmill Geyser, Penta Geyser, Giantess Geyser, Tardy Geyser, Churn Geyser, and Oblong Geyser had stopped erupting. (In fairness, Oblong and Churn Geysers have returned to limited eruption cycles.) Why are these not referred to as evidence that 'activity in Yellowstone is decreasing'? In my opinion, SOTT's nonfactual comments clearly want the reader to believe that things are happening in Yellowstone that could be leading to an eruption, without coming out and directly saying it.

Once again, I will say that it is possible Yellowstone will erupt in the next 5 minutes, I nor anyone else has no way of knowing. However, there is no indication at this time that this is happening. Nearly every article written about Yellowstone wants to take one apsect of the Park, blow it totally out of proportion, and not take into account everything that is happening there. When all of the thermal features in the park start erupting, and Yellowstone Lake, Shoshone Lake, Lewis Lake, and Heart Lake all start boiling and turning to steam, then you will have evidence of a parkwide phenomenon. But one geyser erupting, even though it is Steamboat, with no other unusual activity directly beside it in other thermal features, does not indicate anything big happening in Yellowstone.






Although i do think Dutchsinse has brought to light some notable info, like quakes and fracking, i am still a little wary of him. Maybe that he can try to hype things up a bit too much? Anyway, so i checked out the USGS info on the quake and then tracked it to Yellowstone caldera with google maps and got the following:


So at least according to the above - and i may be wrong - it may not be 'centered' on Yellowstone, which is what i would understand from 'centered'. but perhaps seismically speaking it is pretty close.

It is also true that Yellowstone has been unusually active of late, so i don't doubt that this is worth documenting.

It's up on SOTT and there it states that the last quake of this magnitude was in 1983: M6.5 earthquake strikes in Idaho, largest in the state since 1983 -- Sott.net
 
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