A Children’s Book of Demons

Kari Baba

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I came across this book on Amazon by "chance" (during my search for novels from the thread The Consortium, the Quorum, the alien interface, depicted in 'romantic' fiction - what the heck ?!

I searched the forum but couldn't find out if this book was ever mentioned. If so, then I apologize. Here is the link to Amazon.


It seems like it's not available right now (for whatever reason, I hope not due to high demand). The description on Amazon:

"It's a fun take on children's problems and a kind of wish-fulfillment in dealing with them." - Rob Clough, high-low
"Leighton's portrayals of the many-eyed, many-armed, sharp-toothed demons are outlandish without being creepy, and the creative approach is likely to inspire some readers to create their own demons." - Publishers Weekly

I then started looking for alternative sources thinking what the hell is THAT? Seriously? Encourage children to attach themselves to an entity? The only thing I found was a post on pravda-tv.com

Unfortunately, the site is only in German, but I'm sure there is a lot more material available. Here is a brief summary of the content:

This children's book introduces summoning demons to solve everyday problems such as classwork, homework and eliminating bullies in a fun way. And it gets worse.

While it might be the worst children's book idea ever, A Children's Book of Demons actually exists. It has been published, is widely used, and is sold on Amazon, Walmart, and some of the largest booksellers in the United States. Here is the synopsis from the book by author Aaron Leighton:

Don't you feel like taking out the trash tonight? Maybe your homework is getting too much for you? Maybe this big bully is a real burden? Then grab your crayons and sigil drawing skills and call on some demons! But be careful, even if these ghosts are stupid rather than creepy, they are nonetheless demons.

A review of the book states:

Leighton incorporates an interactive element into this playful guide that invites readers to conjure up gentle demons by writing their sigils, which serve as a direct “phone number” to the respective ghost. The demons require specific incantations (one named Corydon requires a sigil that is "drawn in bright red, the color of a clown's nose - best if you giggle while doing it") that represent certain qualities and abilities that range from pragmatic to disgusting .

These include “Flatulus,” whose talent is to fart; “Quazitoro”, an expert in finding missing items; and “Spanglox”, “the best-dressed demon in the underworld”, who gives advice on the latest fashion. Leighton's depictions of the multi-eyed, multi-armed, sharp-toothed demons are eccentric without being creepy, and the creative concept is likely to inspire some readers to create their own demons. Age 5-10.

A Children's Book of Demons is basically a grimoire (a manual of witchcraft to summon demons and the spirits of the dead) for children. It contains 72 demons that children can summon for their personal benefit (which is the definition of black magic).

I think as soon as you get to know the author A. Leighton dig deeper, you find appropriate connections. Maybe one of you has heard of it before? I just wanted to share that because I was pretty upset about it. The book is currently unavailable. I read the reviews and there was good resistance. Perhaps the makers of this hideous work went a little step too far here too? To reap even the smallest souls in their hubris?
 

Zzartemis

Jedi Council Member
Disturbing but true @Kari Baba

The following is equally disturbing. Approved part of curriculum of California schools:

SNIP:
The curriculum recommendsthat teachers lead their studentsin a series of indigenous songs, chants, and affirmations, including the "In Lak Ech Affirmation," which appeals directly to the Aztec gods. Students first clap and chant tothe god Tezkatlipoka—whom the Aztecs traditionally worshipped with human sacrifice and
cannibalism—asking him for the power to be “warriors” for “social justice.” Next, the students chant to the gods Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, and Xipe Totek, seeking “healing epistemologies” and “a revolutionary spirit.” Huitzilopochtli, in particular, is the Aztec deity of war and inspired hundreds of thousands of human sacrifices during Aztec rule. Finally, the chant comes to a climax with a request for “liberation, transformation, [and] decolonization,” after which students shout “Panche beh! Panche beh!” in pursuit of ultimate “critical consciousness.”

READ IT ALL:
 

cassandra

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I came across this book on Amazon by "chance" (during my search for novels from the thread The Consortium, the Quorum, the alien interface, depicted in 'romantic' fiction - what the heck ?!

I searched the forum but couldn't find out if this book was ever mentioned. If so, then I apologize. Here is the link to Amazon.


It seems like it's not available right now (for whatever reason, I hope not due to high demand). The description on Amazon:



I then started looking for alternative sources thinking what the hell is THAT? Seriously? Encourage children to attach themselves to an entity? The only thing I found was a post on pravda-tv.com

Unfortunately, the site is only in German, but I'm sure there is a lot more material available. Here is a brief summary of the content:



I think as soon as you get to know the author A. Leighton dig deeper, you find appropriate connections. Maybe one of you has heard of it before? I just wanted to share that because I was pretty upset about it. The book is currently unavailable. I read the reviews and there was good resistance. Perhaps the makers of this hideous work went a little step too far here too? To reap even the smallest souls in their hubris?
I have heard about this book before somewhere. I looked at the reviews on Amazon. It has an average rating of 4.5/5, rated by 100 people. One wrote in German, "It belongs in every child's room." Some comments were very critical, thank goodness.
"They" really are pulling out all the stops it seems.
 

Alejo

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Oh lord, what could go wrong? a book that teaches kids to summon demons.

Whether there's some truth to the act of summoning actual demons, I think the main damage is made in creating the habit of running away from your responsibilities by getting a disembodied outside force to come and handle life for you. And it couldn't be angels, it had to be demons.

I can see this picking up popularity with some groups, I can see it also eventually loosing popularity at the same time. But can you imagine a child who lives through traumatic life experiences and is taught that the way to deal with it is to summon a demon? that can be devastating.
 

Miracle

Jedi
FOTCM Member
SOTT had an article about this book back in Dec 2019:


"Summoning demons has never been so fun!" it says.
"Decked with colorful images of some 20 different demons, the book urges children to summon these dark creatures in order to do everything from making themselves sick in order to get out of school and eat ice cream all day, to hypnotizing others and giving themselves "genius-level" smartness."

Absolutely disgusting and entirely unsurprising unfortunately!

I remember back when I was in elementary school there was the 'cool' trend of screaming 'Bloody Mary' into the school's bathroom mirrors to 'summon demons'. I was never 'cool' enough to try but I rather distinctively remember this trendy event. It of course was more or less a game of dare, but it now sure makes me wonder about the origins of why it started. Reminds me of a trailer I watched recently:

 
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