A diet against diverticulitis?

Ursus Minor

Dagobah Resident
I have been developing a diverticulosis over the years which tends to lead to a mild inflammation (diverticulitis) one or two times a year.
In some cases the application of antibiotics could be averted by drinking lots of water and using some lactulosis against opstipation.

Early this year I had bad luck and a diverticulitis could not be stopped by clindamycin (which obviously didn't work) and I had to spend one week in a hospital receiving two different antibiotics intravenously, which in turn damaged the gut flora and led to a period of candida.

Clearly all I need to do is to prevent opstipation, drink a lot of water* and get on my bike daily.

But what about the right diet to prevent further inflammations?

'Science' and nutrition consultants advise me to cling to a high fiber diet with wholemeal bread and vegetables, beans and lots of fruits.

Do you think there is any chance they could be right on any of these points?

Over the years I have adapted my nutrition to that favored here on the forum, which in my case would be meat (fried, minced, cooked) and small amounts of carbs with scrambled eggs and or ham in the morning, with fruits high in Vitamin C along the way.

Beef can be pretty tough to digest - could it perhaps evoke inflammation of diverticular tissue?


* There is a mineral water with healing properties I can recommend: Donat Mg from Slovenia.

It is high in magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, SO4 and CO2. It works miracles against opstipation.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
'Science' and nutrition consultants advise me to cling to a high fiber diet with wholemeal bread and vegetables, beans and lots of fruits.

Do you think there is any chance they could be right on any of these points?
We have a thread somewhere, search for "The Fiber Menace" book by Konstantin Monastirsky:


To bring down the inflammation in your colon, search for low residue diets, like the ones used to prepare yourself for a colonoscopy. Remove inflammatory culprits from those diets, i.e. gluten, and then you'll have a fair chance.

You might want to check out the oxalates in the forum as well.

The mineral water sounds pretty good for your constipation issues, but since it is alkaline, take it away from meals (to not wash away your needed stomach juices for digestion).
 

nicklebleu

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
If you have issues with constipation - and I reckon that is most often the main culprit for diverticulitis - magnesium is probably your best bet: Just find your bowel tolerance and use that as a guide to induce a bowel movement. Over time you should be able to know the best dose to initiate a bowel movement, without producing diarrhoea.

Another option would be vitamin C.
 

gottathink

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Consider also low back issues and tension around the innervation of the digestive tract. Many of my massage therapy clients are helped by massage of the low back and associated muscles to help improve bowel movements.
Also are you getting enough walking exercise?
 

Debra

Jedi Master
You specifically asked about "Diet" which you have gotten answers to that issue.
Before I write any more, I will add this:
What I am posting is Research for Entertainment Purposes Only.
I have no authority nor license to give any medical, psychological, or life skills advice, I just have information to share, for entertainment purposes only.

I experienced this amazing issue, years ago. In hindsight, as I tracked the first symptoms and issues through my history, the initial conflict happened after my divorce in the early 80's.
It was a very "ugly divorce".
It was a very biased and scary divorce situation, yet, I escaped with my children our very few possessions, and very little monetary settlement.
The healing flare ups of diverticulitis would occur a few times a year, for me as well.

During my research and combining "Thought Field/Emotion/Psyche" with Dr. Hamers findings, combining all these alternative aspects of healing, I realized that the flare ups were "anniversary" times of really bad memories and happenings, such as the divorce date.

I have been developing a diverticulosis over the years which tends to lead to a mild inflammation (diverticulitis) one or two times a year.
Seems that your flare ups are similar to what I experienced. I was able to work on these date triggers with Thought Field Therapy.
My primary focus was "releasing any and all feelings/judgments connect to what happened, and ALL the people involved"

But what about the right diet to prevent further inflammations?
Hopefully the info that follows could be considered as "diet".
I tend to see Knowledge and growth as "Food for the Soul" so perhaps what I learned could be seen that way?
I studied and really figured out the different ways the 3 main parts of MY brain processed conflicts.

As much of the reading material regarding psychology, a lot of which is shared here on the Forum, has confirmed, each individual beings "foundation" of emotional and instinctive strengths and weaknesses are different from each other.
Perceptions of life changing shocks and traumas vary greatly.
While a separation, a fight, a divorce can be really hard on some people, there are others who love a fight, and are not shocked by the same shocks, traumas and conflicts that can literally kill weaker people.

So, I did achieve complete healing for my diverticulitis.
It took a bit of finessing, because the area of the brain that controls the tissue is the BRAINSTEM which derives from the ENDODERM, the first and oldest embryonic germ layer.

I wasn't dealing with emotions of the higher Intellect, and so talk therapy, and other modalities couldn't reach it.

The brainstem reacts in very primitive, instinctual and deeply intense life or death feelings.

Here is an example of different situations and issues that can trigger healing responses and conflicts of the Brainstem:

"For animals an indigestible morsel is a real piece of food; for humans, it can also be a figurative “morsel”, for example, a car, a house, or a valuable object. We might also perceive certain circumstances or an unpleasant event as a “morsel” and suffer the conflict when the situation is considered as “indigestible” or “non-absorbable”, let’s say, when an anticipated purchase, promotion, or promise cannot be “taken in”. The distinctive aspect of the morsel conflict corresponding to the colon, including the appendix and the cecum, is that the conflict is experienced as particularly “ugly”, for instance, ugly fights over money or over a property, ugly divorces, ugly court cases, or ugly betrayals."

Sending you Best wishes for your Health Adventure and Discovery of how you process stuff!
 

Ursus Minor

Dagobah Resident
If you have issues with constipation - and I reckon that is most often the main culprit for diverticulitis - magnesium is probably your best bet: Just find your bowel tolerance and use that as a guide to induce a bowel movement. Over time you should be able to know the best dose to initiate a bowel movement, without producing diarrhoea.

Another option would be vitamin C.

You're absolutely right. That's why I'm using Donat Mg (mentioned up above). It's very high in magnesium.
I have never thought about applying vitamin C for constipation, actually.
 

Ursus Minor

Dagobah Resident
Consider also low back issues and tension around the innervation of the digestive tract. Many of my massage therapy clients are helped by massage of the low back and associated muscles to help improve bowel movements.
Also are you getting enough walking exercise?

A chiropractor once indicated that there is a close connection between the digestive tract and low back issues. Sadly he went back to the Philippines last year.

When I developed candida I always had an enormous tension down there. Massages didn't help in that case because it was about toxins.

I try to get on the bike on a daily basis but with the weather getting colder walking would be helpful.
 

Ursus Minor

Dagobah Resident
Sending you Best wishes for your Health Adventure and Discovery of how you process stuff!

Thank you, Debra.

As much as I am into psychology as a possible solution for a lot of ailments, for me personally diverticulitis is not one of the symptoms that I would develop when a trauma is being reactivated.

In my case it is mainly high blood pressure as I've mentioned in my 'swamp' thread.

I have come to know a couple of people (and a doggy) though, who reacted with a colitis over and over again when experiencing psychological pressure.

At the end of the day (being 64) I will have to accept that the colon tissue is obviously getting softer with the years and the diverticula that already exist will not go away.
 
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