Bulletproof Tea and Chocolate

Foxx

The Living Force
I've been making this beverage lately and really enjoying it, so I thought I'd share my idea and method if anyone else thought it might be interesting. I was inspired by someone posting about bulletproof coffee and how delicious it was on my facebook wall. Here's an article about bulletproof coffee:

_http://www.bulletproofexec.com/how-to-make-your-coffee-bulletproof-and-your-morning-too/

I've never been a coffee drinker (and didn't partake in the coffee experiment a while ago), so the coffee aspect didn't interest me, but I thought it would be delicious with tea or chocolate. Here's how I make it:

  • Boil a mug's worth of water and steep your tea (the best way to steep tea depends on the type of tea)
  • Add 2 Tablespoons worth of butter to your blender (I use Kerrygold salted and I think it turns out fine)
  • If you'd like it a little sweet, add a dropper full or two of liquid Stevia or however much Xylitol you'd prefer
  • Pour the tea into the blender and blend on high until fully mixed, about 30 seconds
  • Sometimes, I like to add a little vanilla extract before blending

To do this with chocolate, just add cocoa powder to the blender and skip the tea steeping part. I usually use a heaping tablespoon of cocoa powder. Turns out like tasty hot chocolate!

The key to these tasting delicious is the blending step. When blending the liquid and the fat at high speeds, the fat doesn't just stay on top of the water, it blends completely with the liquid, like adding cream to the tea (but without the evil). If I understand correctly, what's happening is that the fat is emulsifying and so the water and fat become more or less one substance, instead of remaining two, with one on top of the other. I think it should work with any fat, not just butter (but I haven't tried that yet).

I've been enjoying making it with Pu Ehr tea, steeped for a while to make it strong (~5 minutes), stevia, and a little bit of vanilla extract. Right now, I'm drinking it with Tulsi tea, stevia, and some vanilla extract and that's also very tasty.

Enjoy! :)
 

xandra

The Force is Strong With This One
That sounds great! I still use coconut oil. I didn't think of the blender, I am going ro try that. Thanks for the idea!
 

Odyssey

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I've been making this bulletproof tea as well. It's quite yummy. I usually add MCT oil and sometimes Kerry gold butter with a little xylitol. I tried adding some cocoa powder once but I didn't care for it at all.
 

Mr. Premise

The Living Force
That's a great idea. Before when I would try adding fat to tea, like you said, it just floats to the top and can be a little weird to drink.
 

ScarletBegonias

Dagobah Resident
Mr. Premise said:
That's a great idea. Before when I would try adding fat to tea, like you said, it just floats to the top and can be a little weird to drink.
Hmm, that's interesting. I've noticed it seems more like a broth to me. Perhaps MCT oil would work better for you? The nice thing about it is that it stays in liquid form even when it's chilled. I also use MCT oil for iced drinks and it seems to work great for me.
 

darksai

Jedi Master
I've found that using a blender for solid chocolate works really well too if you're not using an emulsifier like soy lecithin. I use xylitol and it smooths out the sticky crystalline texture as well as the powdery feeling on the throat that the cocoa leaves sometimes.

Mod note: deleted identical double post :)
 

PullingPins

Padawan Learner
Yum. I just recently got a blender, which will make this so much easier! I usually just put everything in a mason jar, and shake til it hurts :lol: It's so creamy and delicious, I don't find that it really needs to be sweetened.
 

Cyle

Padawan Learner
Thank you for sharing, I am excited to attempt a cup myself, when I get close to a blender :)
 

ALIEN1

Padawan Learner
Thanks for sharing the recipe. I take my tea with butter all the way through the day, and I love it, especially with salted butter and it doesn't bother me that the fat floats at the top. Only it takes some stirring in order to dissolve it :] My only concern with the blender is pouring hot tea in it, since it's made of plastic... or am I going over the top here? And regarding the Kerrygold butter, I recently come across this article:
_http://hopecentric.com/why-i-stopped-buying-kerrygold-butter/ and that left me feeling dissapointed... I tried other brands, but I still prefer Kerrygold, not sure now if I still should be buying it... And if not, I know that even if I go for organic butter that doesn't mean it's grassfed. Tough times indeed.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
ALIEN1 said:
My only concern with the blender is pouring hot tea in it, since it's made of plastic... or am I going over the top here?

I use a glass blender. I might be weary of the plastic blender, but admittedly the hot tea is only going to be in there for ~30 seconds and will be cooled a bit by the butter (if you get it from the fridge, which I do), so it probably won't be particularly terrible in terms of absorbing the BPA and other questionable/evil things in plastic.

ALIEN1 said:
And regarding the Kerrygold butter, I recently come across this article:
_http://hopecentric.com/why-i-stopped-buying-kerrygold-butter/ and that left me feeling dissapointed... I tried other brands, but I still prefer Kerrygold, not sure now if I still should be buying it... And if not, I know that even if I go for organic butter that doesn't mean it's grassfed. Tough times indeed.

Yeah I saw that too. I'm still eating it for now, but thinking about whether I want to change brands after reading that. There's also this article:

_http://www.packofpacks.com/3/post/2012/08/the-big-on-butter-kerry-gold-overall-winner-in-german-butter-study.html

Translated from _www.hotelier.de article posted 24.July 2012

The concentration of valuable nutrients in grass-fed butter is far higher than in common butter brands. A current analysis study by Professor Dr. Klaus Eder of the Gießen University concluded that grass-fed milk has the best fat composition as well as the highest vitamin contents. The ten biggest German butter brands have been analysed. Among them were well known brands such as Weihenstephan, Kerrygold, Meggle and Landliebe as well as trade brands.

The grass-fed butter Kerrygold showed the highest content of healthy nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamin A and E as well as Omega 3 fatty acids.

"Kerrygold surpassing all other brands"

Within the scope of the analysis study ten butter brands have been chosen of which 5 packs of summer- and winter butter have been picked from different grocery stores. They were chosen based on their fatty acid composition and their vitamin A, E and beta-carotene levels.

Expert panel (fr. left):. Prof. Dr. Eder, Franca Mangiameli, Prof. Dr. Nocolai Worm"The butter brand Kerrygold from Ireland is in comparison in its nutrients clearly surpassing the other brands." illustrates Klaus Eder the results of the study. For example does the butter contain 51% more vitamin E on average from all the other nine brands.

Grass-fed milk contains more beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids is Omega 3 fatty. Its share is 40% higher than with the compared brands. The content health promoting beta-carotene is even 70% higher than the content of the the other analysed butter brands.

So perhaps there are still some advantages to it despite the other things that they're feeding the cows, or just other factors at play.
 

Chrissy

Jedi Council Member
I never thought to add vanilla to tea. I'm going to try that. Thank you Foxx.

I have been adding butter to hot drinks using a little tool called a frother. They are pretty inexpensive and work really well. I also use it to mix vitamin c crystals in water. This is similar to what I have:

_http://www.bonjourproducts.com/53849.html
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Remember that butter contains 20% water. It also contains milk solids, including casein, which is a natural emulsifier. This probably helps.

I've put water and oil in a blender and yes, the oil will emulsify and combine with the water to become milky white. It tasted terrible though (admittedly it was a flawed experiment), and I wonder if the oil is being denatured and oxidized by the blender (processed oils are hydrogenated in order to make them more solid and easier to emulsify).

Our Oster blender jar is borosilicate and tempered, so it won't break from heat shock. Some blender jars will; borosilicate glass has a green tint. Plastic blender jars can be more break resistant than glass, but if you look at such a blender after regular use you'll see the plastic is discolored and worn rough, meaning you've eaten that plastic.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Also, many blender jar bases will also fit canning jars and often other jars that come from the grocery store. We have used mug-sized canning jars to blend individual drinks (so you don't have to mess with the huge blender jar), but you can get canning mugs.
 

will01

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I've made the chocolate version of this drink a couple of times, only instead of using butter or ghee, I used 30 - 40 grams of rendered lamb suet. It blended really smooth and creamy with no "animal fat" aftertaste. I used a small amount of stevia to sweeten and have also found that combining cinnamon makes a nice addition as well.
 
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