Constant pain while sitting

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
For little over a year now, I've been experiencing pain while sitting. Sometimes it has gotten a bit better, but it has never completely been absent. If I sit, no matter how hard or soft the surface is, for more than 5min, I'll get this burning and throbbing pain in my buttocks and lower back, and the pain also radiates to my legs, all the way to the soles of my feet.

I've consulted/visited several specialists, including a chiropractor and two physical therapists, and also a regular doctor who ordered an x-ray of my lower back and pelvic region. The x-ray showed nothing unusual. The last couple of months or so, the problem has got even worse (even if I've avoided sitting as much as I can), and I'm getting pretty desperate. The burning/throbbing sensation has started to occur also while standing up, which worries me. So far, lying down and sleeping are okay - I don't have pain then. However, there's a lot of muscle twitching that, according to the PT happens when the muscles relax once I've laid down.

I've researched the subject myself, and things like piriformis syndrome, coccyx syndrome, and bulging disc fit the profile. I'm stretching the leg and buttock muscles every day, and I've also started doing yoga again, but nothing seems to help.

This all started before I started taking iodine, so I can't see that this would be related to that. The foremost specialist I saw, who is a PT, suspected that the right side of my pelvis isn't moving as it should be (he checked this by some movements he made me do). He did some manipulation of the lowest part of the spine, plus some other things, and for a short while things felt better. This didn't however last for long.

Since I've had all sorts of muscle and skeletal pain during the last ten years or so, and since I'm having an healthy lifestyle and diet, I've started to think that perhaps I have a "critter problem". The symptom check list for e.g. Lyme disease actually mentions pelvic pain, and a few other things also match. But right now, I'm quite confused about what to do regarding my problem. I wouldn't want to start a long treatment with antibiotics, without being sure if it's needed. Perhaps I'll ramp up the iodine intake and see if it helps in any way.

The pain restricts all my activities right now, and is starting to drag me into a depression. So any suggestions and ideas are welcomed!
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Could it be inflamed/damaged blood vessels?
https://www.sott.net/article/320883-Sitting-too-much-can-damage-your-blood-vessels
For adults, it is known that sitting for hours causes constricted arteries in your legs, which then impedes blood flow, raises blood pressure, and contributes to the development of heart disease.
My understanding is throbbing pain can be do to restricted circulation and/or nerve damage.
You could have a look at the arginine protocol attached to the post here: https://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,13371.msg651628.html#msg651628
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Been having the same issue. So, been taking walks in the evenings, which helps a lot.

Also while searching for large boulders (80kg and up in the forest ), that using a furniture dolly works as an extra form of exercise. It really helps with bring back muscle tone, especially within the hip area and below.

One can see with the green vegetation setting, adds an added bonus, to maintain mental stability, and a feeling of calm.

So perhaps thinking creatively, in your approach may bring benefit's with the elimination of said issue's.

FWIW, and good luck.




Here's What Sitting Too Long Does to Your Body
May 08, 2015
By Dr. Mercola
http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2015/05/08/sitting-too-long.aspx
How to Get Up and Get Moving

I believe high-intensity exercises are an important part of a healthy lifestyle, but considering the fact that more than half of American men, and 60 percent of American women, never engage in any vigorous physical activity lasting more than 10 minutes per week,13 while at the same time sitting for hours on end, it's clear that most people need to begin by simply getting more non-exercise movement into their daily routine.

It sounds simple, doesn't it? Simply get up and move. The reality can be harder to get used to, since most people are so used to sitting while they work, eat, and watch TV. I recommend using a pedometer, or better yet, one of the newer wearable fitness trackers that can also give you feedback on your sleeping patterns, which is another important aspect of good health. At first, you may be surprised to realize just how little you move each day.

Setting a goal of say 7,000 to 10,000 steps a day (which is just over three to five miles, or 6-9 kilometers) can go a long way toward getting more movement and less sitting into your life. This should be over and above any exercise regimen you may have. I personally am doing about 14,000-15,000 steps a day. The only way I can get this many steps in is to walk for 90 minutes. Tracking your steps can also show you how simple and seemingly minor changes to the way you move around at work can add up. For example, you can:

Walk across the hall to talk to a coworker instead of sending an email
Take the stairs instead of the elevator
Park your car further away from the entrance
Take a longer, roundabout way to your desk

Other simple ways to increase your physical movement and avoid sitting down at work include:

Organize the layout of your office space in such a way that you have to stand up to reach oft-used files, the telephone, or your printer, rather than having everything within easy reach.
Use an exercise ball for a chair. Unlike sitting in a chair, sitting on an exercise ball engages your core muscles and helps improve balance and flexibility. Occasional bouncing can also help your body interact with gravity to a greater degree than sitting on a stationary chair. But this is a concession and it is still sitting, so standing would be a better option.
Alternatively, use an upright wooden chair with no armrest, which will force you to sit up straight, and encourage shifting your body more frequently than a cushy office chair.
Set a timer to remind you to stand up and move about for at least 10 minutes each hour. You can either walk, stand, or take the opportunity to do a few simple exercises by your desk. For an extensive list of videos demonstrating such exercises, please see my previous article, "Intermittent Movement Benefits Your Health. Here's How to Get More of It into Your Work Day."
Use a standing workstation. For a demonstration on proper posture, whether you're sitting or using a standing workstation, check out Kelly Starrett's video. We are in the process of providing all our employees at mercola.com standing desk options. If you have a sit-down job, I would strongly encourage you to present this information to your employer and get a stand-up desk.

Are You Sitting Too Much?
-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiKg6JfS658
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Any numbness/weakness in the legs with the pain?

http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/leg-pain/leg-pain-and-numbness-what-might-these-symptoms-mean
Leg pain can range from a mild nuisance that comes and goes, to debilitating pain that makes it difficult to sleep, walk, or engage in simple everyday activities.

Leg pain and numbness can be experience in many forms—some patients describe the pain as aching, searing, throbbing, or burning, or like standing in a bucket of ice water.

The pain can also be accompanied by neurological symptoms, such as a pins-and-needles sensation, numbness, or weakness. The weakness may be persistent, or it may come on suddenly or unpredictably, often described as the leg "giving out."

Leg pain may be caused by a problem in the leg, but often the root cause of the problem starts in the lower back, where the sciatic nerve originates, and then travels along the path of the nerve (called sciatica).


Or it could start at the L3-L4 level, where a nerve branches off from the lumbar spine and travels through the front of the thigh.

The medical term for leg pain that is caused by irritation of a lumbar nerve root is lumbar radiculopathy.

Because the lumbar nerves travel through various parts of the leg and foot, a diagnosis of anyone with leg pain, foot pain, and/or leg or ankle or foot weakness or numbness, should include an examination of the lower back.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
It sounds like a stubborn case of sciatica. Have you addressed common physical causes?

Mineral replacement and methylated B vitamins are very important. Also sleeping with a pillow between your legs, specially if you sleep in one of your sides.

Hydration with salted water is also important, specially during iodine therapy.

I think that Rolfing would be useful, if that is accessible. It might release the energetic tension from deep within your fascia and pelvic muscles.

The antibiotic protocol could be contemplated, but I think it should be reserved as the last option.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks guys for your replies! I'm pretty sure, as Gaby said, that the sciatic nerve is the problem. However, as different sources all say, the underlying causes for sciatica, or sciatica-like symptoms, are many. The theory this PT suggested (he wasn't 100% sure yet) would fit with "sacroiliacic joint syndrome". If it's that, the literature that I've read doesn't offer much help other than surgery or injections. Many sources say that smoking and nicotine is one of the main causes of disc degeneration-I wonder if there's any merit to this?

Muscle strength in my legs is good, and I don't experience any numbness or knife sharp blasts of pain. This is a good sign, I think. It's interesting, Gaby, that you mentioned vitamin B's; at one point I was taking a high quality(Solgar) vitamin B12 supplement, and the pain almost went away completely. Some months later, after the pain had come back, I tried this again, this time with another label (also with methylcobalamin) that wasn't quite as strong, but this time it had no effect. I'm going to give Solgar's supplement another try, and also try the pillow thingy.

Do you think getting a MRI be of any use?
 

Nancy2feathers

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Hi Aragorn. Sorry to hear what you are going through. :scared: Years ago I went to a chiropractor who gave me an adjustment and threw my tailbone out of alignment. I had excruciating pain and a burning sensation when sitting. I ended up going to another chiropractor whom I trusted over the years to set it back in place. Just a simple but uncomfortable maneuver. I don't know if what you are experiencing is the same, but I thought I would mention it.
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I agree that it might be sciatica. Do you suffer from any urinary or bowel problems too?
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Aragorn said:
Do you think getting a MRI be of any use?
It would probably say inflammation of this or that, something that you already know.

If you would feel reassured, you could go ahead with it. But don't expect too much in terms of being the solution to your problem.

I would add B6 and B1 into the mix and if something specifically helped you in the past, you could try that again.

You can also try DMSO + comfrey root packs into your lower back and also where the sciatic nerve exits the spine.
 

casper

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Moving is usually the last thing people dogged by sciatica want to do, but it's important to be physically active. Take 15- to 20-minute walks. If that hurts too much, give swimming or water aerobics a try; there's not as much pressure on the back when you're in the water.
Also,some people find pain relief from complementary and alternative therapies such as biofeedback and acupuncture.

Take care :hug2:
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
casper said:
Moving is usually the last thing people dogged by sciatica want to do, but it's important to be physically active.
I think this is very true. Years ago on a sailing cruise in the Carib, I was hauling in on a jib sheet and actually heard something in my lower back give way - followed by tremendous pain. But being on a sailboat (shorthanded), I had no choice but to bear the pain under pounding conditions of the boat through open water swells. Getting up in the morning would initially feel impossible. But after a few days I was pretty much back to normal - the most rapid healing of low back damage that I have ever experienced. The tremendous pain associated with the boat environment must have served as a big signal to the brain to concentrate priority healing on the damage.

I'm not suggesting that you subject yourself to extreme pain and risk further damage - just saying that the pain may be a necessary signal to the brain to direct healing.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
What's your choline intake like? i.e. are you eating egg yokes, liver, fish? Nerves need choline to repair.
If those aren't an option, sunflower lecithin powder should help. Assuming it's not caused by structural misalignment, which a chiropractor would fix.
 

Odyssey

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
It sounds like sciatica to me too. I had it once and it was awful and just lingered and lingered despite homeopathy and chiropractic adjustments. The only thing that worked was some good rolfing that really got deep into the fascia.
 

kujo

Jedi
Sorry to hear of your pain! Lots of good insight here from everyone. I've recently been seeing someone who specializes in Chinese medicine/acupuncture for sports related injuries, specifically rotator cuff pain. I'm amazed at what it's done for me. If it's an avenue you haven't ventured down yet I believe it's worth considering.

Also, what comes to mind is how are you sitting. Hips below the height of your knees? It may very well be a combination of factors.
 
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