Dam failures, floods, landslides

Metrist

Dagobah Resident
I found this link while searching for satellite imagery during the flooding in Europe.

It says warnings were sent out, and that they arrived too late, or were ignored. So, the science was able to capture this threat potential and relay it.

 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
#Maltempo, since this morning heavy rains have affected the province of #Varese : carried out by #vigilidelfuoco 40 interventions for flooding and landslides between the areas of Gavirate and Luvinate, in Brusimpiano a stream overflowed carrying debris against a house #28luglio


Every monsoon season poses risks to the country, but this one is shaping up as especially destructive as climate change turbocharges rainfall.
Updated July 27, 2021
NEW DELHI — Within seconds, the scenic mountain valley resembled a war zone.

“Guys, we have to run!” said a man filming the devastation unfolding in his hillside town in northern India on Sunday, as a landslide set off by incessant monsoon rains sent heavy rocks tumbling down a steep slope.

At least nine people were killed when a boulder struck their vehicle. Their deaths added to a toll of at least 164, with 100 reported missing, on the country’s western coast, where heavy rains have deluged entire towns and villages.

India’s monsoons have always arrived with fury. But the scenes of death and destruction playing out in the country are yet another reminder of the urgency of climate change, experts say. A warming climate means extreme rainfall in many parts of the world, scientists have said.

Record rainfalls in central China and Western Europe have killed scores in recent weeks and displaced many others. On Saturday, the authorities in the Philippines evacuated thousands of residents after a tropical storm flooded the capital, Manila, and nearby provinces.
In the last few months, India, a nation of 1.4 billion people, has experienced two powerful cyclones and deadly floods in the Himalayas. It has also suffered through extreme temperatures, including a heat wave that killed thousands of people.

Scientists have warned that extreme weather is likely to become more common and more intense in the coming decades as sea levels rise and the Indian Ocean becomes warmer.

“The threat of rising sea level is something that we often overlook and underestimate,” said Roxy Koll, a climate scientist in India and one of the authors of a study released last week on how a warming climate will make heat waves and cyclones more frequent and more ferocious in India.

“Climate change is a threat multiplier,” the authors, Mr. Koll and Chirag Dhara, an assistant professor at Krea University in the southeastern state of Andhra Pradesh, wrote in the study. “In the absence of rapid, informed and far-reaching mitigation and adaptation measures, the effects of climate change are likely to pose profound challenges to sustaining the country’s rapid economic growth.”
India’s agrarian economy depends heavily on monsoon rain. Too little means a drought, and too much can cause catastrophic flooding.

Extreme rainfall washes away fertile topsoil, while droughts deplete groundwater reserves that have been declining rapidly in many parts of the country for years. Together, they have caused misery and death on India’s farms.

Over the weekend, heavy rains continued to pummel the western state of Maharashtra, where rescue workers struggled to reach areas cut off by flooding and landslides. Workers dug through mud and transported people by boat in areas where the water had reached the tops of houses.

Nearly 300,000 people have been evacuated and thousands were staying in relief camps, state officials said on Monday. There have been more than 250 deaths in the state related to the monsoon season since it began last month.

A section of highway partly collapsed after heavy rain in Mahad, in the state of Maharashtra, on Saturday.

A section of highway partly collapsed after heavy rain in Mahad, in the state of Maharashtra, on Saturday. Credit...Indranil Mukherjee/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Uddhav Thackeray, Maharashtra’s top official, said on Twitter that his helicopter could not land because of “low visibility” as he tried to visit flood-affected areas in the district of Satara.

India’s meteorological department forecast “fairly widespread to widespread rainfall” for the next two days across northern, eastern and western parts of the country.

About 1,000 miles from Maharashtra, in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh, officials said on Monday that at least 100 people remained stranded after the landslide on the mountain slope, and that rescue efforts were continuing.
Video footage showed heavy rocks knocking down a metal bridge. The boulders pounded vehicles and fell into a nearby river, making giant splashes and sounds akin to exploding bombs.

“The accident caused by landslide in Kinnaur, Himachal Pradesh, is very sad,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Twitter. “My heartfelt condolences to the families of those who lost their lives.”

Mr. Modi announced compensation of 200,000 rupees, or more than $2,500, to the families of those who died.

Updated Mon, Jul 26 20219:57 PM EDT
  • Shipping has already seen massive disruptions this year like the Ever Given running aground in the Suez Canal and delays stemming from an uptick in Covid cases near ports in southern China.
  • The floods in China and Europe are yet “another body blow” for global supply chains, the CEO of a shipping firm told CNBC on Monday.
The floods in China and Europe are yet “another body blow” for global supply chains, the CEO of a shipping firm told CNBC on Monday.
“Rarely does a week go past without something new,” says Tim Huxley, CEO of Mandarin Shipping.

Shipping has already seen massive disruptions this year. As parts of the world rebounded from the pandemic, increased spending led to a shortfall of containers, creating delays and driving up prices.

Then in April, one of the world’s largest container ships became wedged in the Suez Canal, halting traffic for nearly a week. The waterway is one of the busiest in the world, with about 12% of trade passing through it.

In June, an uptick of Covid cases in southern China caused more delays at ports in the region, again jacking up shipping prices.

‘Broken railway links’ caused by floods in Europe

Heavy rainfall and flooding have devastated parts of western Europe. Some of the most severe flooding happened in Germany and Belgium. Parts of Switzerland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands have been affected as well.

“This is really going to disrupt the supply chain because the railway links have all been broken,” Huxley told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia.”

He said that includes railways coming from the Czech Republic and Slovakia into the German ports of Rotterdam and Hamburg, which have been “seriously disrupted.”

“And so that’s going to delay cargo movements in and out,” he said. “It’s gonna really disrupt the industry.”

Huxley pointed to Thyssenkrupp, noting the German steel making giant could not get raw materials due to the flooding.

“That ultimately will have a knock on effect on industries such as the motor industry, domestic appliances and things like that,” he said.
S&P Global Platts reported, citing a letter to customers, Thyssenkrupp declared force majeure on July 16. A force majeure event occurs when unforeseeable circumstances, such as natural catastrophes, prevent one party from fulfilling its contractual duties, absolving them from penalties.

A source at the firm’s mills told S&P Global Platts that parts of the railway in Hagen are “missing,” adding it’s even more difficult than before to get trucks for delivery. Hagen is a city in Western Germany that is among the worst-hit by the floods.

Flooding in landlocked Henan disrupting supply of wheat, coal

Meanwhile, the disruption caused by the flooding in the Chinese province of Henan is made worse by the fact that the province is landlocked, said Huxley.

The disruption of railways is, again, going to cause a “big impact,” he said.

“Obviously, that will have an impact on shipping, that will force shipping rates up,” Huxley said.

The distribution of wheat and coal has been affected, according to Huxley, who pointed out that Henan is the “bread basket” of China and has produced 38 million tons of wheat this summer.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Another landslide at England's Jurassic Coast.

Aug 3, 2021
A section of cliff has collapsed cutting off a stretch of beach on the Jurassic Coast.The large rock fall, which happened on Saturday, blocked off the beach between Eype and Seatown in Dorset.Dorset Council warned the fall had "not yet settled" and the ground inland was "relaxing with more cracks opening up".The authority has urged people to obey the safety signs and not cross the cordons or climb on the debris on the beach.A stretch of the South West Coast Path, which runs along the top of the credit: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-d...

 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Snip: Photos Analyses with Comparisons
Major flooding washed away homes, roads and bridges along North Korea’s east coast in recent days, according to NK News analysis of satellite imagery, as DPRK state television said that some areas have already seen over 580 millimeters of rain (23 inches).

The floods come on the heels of a monthlong heat wave and drought in July that state media said damaged crops and may threaten upcoming harvests. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un admitted in June that the country was facing a “food crisis” after suffering typhoon damage last year.

State media has recently reported on widespread efforts to reinforce shores and riverbanks ahead of what it says could be multiple typhoon events in August, but it has yet to report on the latest damages.

The latest flooding occurred in small towns along major rivers in North and South Hamgyong provinces from Aug. 1-3, Planet Labs satellite imagery shows.

City in India
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
3:00 AM · Aug 13, 2021·TweetDeck
6:58PM: Flash Flood Warning (green box) in effect until 10:00PM this evening. Areas of heavy rain over the next several hours. #txwx #nmwx @txdotelp @TxDPS @EPPOLICE




Updated: August 11th, 2021 Video's Tweets
It’s been four days since Mirzapur is witnessing massive flooding due to the Ganga river flowing above the danger mark. The rising waters of the Ganges and the Karnavati rivers have cut-off over 400 villages in the district, as the affected villagers are reeling under food shortage and migrating in search of a safer ground.

Heavy rainfall in Kagoshima Prefecture Continues Total rainfall exceeds one month in August of normal years Underfloor inundation and landslides occur one after another in the center of the Hokusatsu area http://dlvr.it/S5YG6J#南日本新聞#鹿児島

Move cursor over product links to display the graphic or click to access graphic.
August 11 2021
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yngvi

A Disturbance in the Force
You might be interested in this: yewtu.be/Z08fsZN8x_I
The video is in Russian, but you can choose English subtitles or download them along with the video using youtube-dl, and then watch them in any player. There are a few ads in between, though, 03:00-04:55

The writer of this video is alexandrafl.livejournal.com
 

iamthatis

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member

In this latest S0 report, there's new evidence suggesting that an entire ocean's worth of water is locked up in the Earth's crust. With an uptick in quakes, also covered in the video, one wonders if this underground ocean will start making an appearance on the surface as the bones of the earth start to dance.

One also wonders what is in the water if it begins appearing. I'm thinking about new 'information' in the form of bacteria and virii that Gaia has been saving up in her own underground 'Wuhan lab', to be set loose when the time is ripe.

Also, a desert river in China flooding, then running backwards. So that exists as a possibility. There's also a brief mention of potential tsunami dynamics off the coast of Oregon, whose concave coast would increase a wave's height, and drive water deep into the inlets. And potentially could cause the Columbia to run backwards, too.
 

iamthatis

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member

In this latest S0 report, there's new evidence suggesting that an entire ocean's worth of water is locked up in the Earth's crust. With an uptick in quakes, also covered in the video, one wonders if this underground ocean will start making an appearance on the surface as the bones of the earth start to dance.

One also wonders what is in the water if it begins appearing. I'm thinking about new 'information' in the form of bacteria and virii that Gaia has been saving up in her own underground 'Wuhan lab', to be set loose when the time is ripe.

Also, a desert river in China flooding, then running backwards. So that exists as a possibility. There's also a brief mention of potential tsunami dynamics off the coast of Oregon, whose concave coast would increase a wave's height, and drive water deep into the inlets. And potentially could cause the Columbia to run backwards, too.


Here's a follow-up video. Water is drawn to electric current. There's been an increase in lightning due to the earth's weakening magnetic field. Take these together, and we can predict that the 'ocean underground' will start to migrate towards the surface. This will add more water to the surface's hydrological cycle. Anyone want to guess what that would do?
 

dennis

Jedi Master
NYC flooding from IDA

From one of the comments this video shows tremendous winds converging on Cape Cod.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Accumulated precipitation estimated by the AEMET radar between 2:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. yesterday. More intense in the mountains, La Mancha and Campos de Hellín #Albacete . Some accumulated (l / m²)#meteoAB :

It has happened again! This morning (09/02/2021), that's how the Rambla del Cañarete went down,#Águilas (#Murcia).
@SpainStormPred@severeweatherEU . Video:@MikeTaymar . Higher frequency of extreme atmospheric events + terrible spatial planning. There are limits that must be respected.

Line-1 Media @Plan_INFOCAM of the @gobjccm collaborate from early afternoon with the @112clm in the water and mud dewatering works in the areas of #Toledo ,#Cobisa ,#Argés ,#Polán ,#Guadamur and #Nambroca . The #METEOCAM in all #CLM .
Line-2
An air medium of the @Plan_INFOCAM of the @gobjccm fly over the affected areas to assess the situation after the heavy rains @112clm


 
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