Diabetes

G

Godot

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I have a Pakistani Sufi friend who is suffering from the side affects of type two diabetes.He is about 40, possibly slightly overweight, and works long hours but not at physical labour.
I haven't seen him for a while and only had a chance to have a fairly brief conversation last night so pardon the sketchiness.
I don't know his blood type, but have googled up what seems to be a fairly comprehensive description of blood types in relation to diet, exercise etc.
I have also advised him to have a TCM checkout.
The Sufi group to which he belongs has become factionalised, and I'm not too sure whether the form of meditation (we have discussed hara breathing and Irish dancing) I thought would be most suitable for him is being practised.
This is the whirling dervish dance which I understand is only really done under Inspiration anyway.
He has also been, though not recently to my knowledge, subject to some fairly severe spiritual attacks, by what seems to be a Aryan coven (?) so this may be a factor too.
Any recommendations anyone?
 

Ruth

The Living Force
Type Two Diabetes

You can give him a copy of "Eat Right for your Type". It might help. He needs to keep his blood sugar level as close to the normal parameters as he can, get more exercise as well as look at his diet. There is probably a diabetes charity group or office in your area which can give advice or maybe even free samples as well as ideas on how to work with his diabetes.

I'm not sure what diabetes means esoterically. It may have something to do with forgiveness. It may have something to do with rigidity of beliefs. I'm not sure - can't find anything on it at the moment. It may even be an individualistic thing. You might like to try suggesting a natropath or alternative therapies, but make sure he understands that it is complementary medicine medical advice from a doctor should not be ignored!

I guess the biggest problem many people face is recognising that their bodies imbalance comes from a mind or emotional imbalance. The body is just telling them something needs to change. Trouble is, in the Western world not many people tend to listen to their bodies telling them stuff. So they just treat the symptoms not the cause. Perhaps we have forgotten how to listen.
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
Diabetes Discussion

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=a042812e-492c-4f07-8245-8a598ab5d1bf&k=63970



Sorry I initially read the article wrong, they discovered it’s NOT an auto-immune disease… it’s caused by some sort of breakdown in the nervous system:



In a discovery that has stunned even those behind it, scientists at a Toronto hospital say they have proof the body's nervous system helps trigger diabetes, opening the door to a potential near-cure of the disease that affects millions of Canadians.



But that’s not all…



"The treatment and diagnosis of neuropathic diseases is poised to take a dramatic leap forward because of the impressive research."


Dr. Dosch had concluded in a 1999 paper that there were surprising similarities between diabetes and multiple sclerosis, a central nervous system disease. His interest was also piqued by the presence around the insulin-producing islets of an "enormous" number of nerves, pain neurons primarily used to signal the brain that tissue has been damaged.


*************************************************************************************************************************

My Hubby sent me this article, and it looks interesting. My father is currently quite ill with diabetes, and I've had MS for 7 years now. I wanted to share this for anyone else who is also dealing with same.


Gimpy

Hoping the link thingy works
 

Ruth

The Living Force
Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

Interesting, it appears there's a sensory nervous system link between diabetes. Good find! Something appears to be 'going wrong' between the nervous system and the inflammatory response that is generated in the pancreas. It is the inflammatory response which kills the beta cells in the pancreas - presumably - for type 1 diabetes.

Its almost like the pain stimulus in reverse. Or, perhaps it is part of a process (like a cascade) which can't be stopped once it starts.

Normally, (think of a cut finger) we only feel pain when there is damage of some kind. This stimulates an immune response.

The normal manifestions of inflammation are: redness (caused by vasodilation and blood rushing to the area); heat (increased metabolism in area - naturally - there's a lot going on, all of a sudden); pain - characterised by " change in pH, change in local ionic cocentration; nerve stimulation by chemicals (e.g. histamine, prostaglandins), pressure from fluid exudate." (Brown & Edwards: Lewis's Medical Surgical Nursing, 2005, p.215), swelling - caused by fluid shift and.... loss of function.

What if, the nerves (sensory nervous system) are picking up and transmitting incorrect information, (or are they? - we don't know for sure) - but they might! This is all part of the cascade. The problem appears, but which comes first, the chicken or the egg? And what triggers it? Dr Salter has discovered that disrupting or negating part of the body's normal reaction to an abnormal occurance, negates the response to that abnormality. It seems that these things (may) be all connected and it is possible that researchers have been 'looking up the wrong tree', if they wanted to 'trip-wire' a response (such as diabetes).

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061216155224.htm

It does indeed cause a pause for thought. Sometimes things are more connected (and less separate) than we may have thought.

ps. If you want to keep your Dad's diabetes under control, tell him he must control his blood sugar levels (with military precision if possible! He might like that analogy, I don't know). Tell him he must work with his doctor like a Commanding Officer works with his Drill Seargent. I'm sorry, but with blood sugar levels, the stricter the control, within certain limits, the better. High blood sugar level (hyperglycaemia) causes macro and micro vascular problems and you don't want that. Hypoglycaemia means death (and you don't want that, either) Sometimes getting people to keep their blood sugar levels within a very strict range is the secret to success. And often they like the idea of having this control, too. If people could control their blood sugar levels as closely as possible, in partnership with their health care professionals, this would stop a lot of problems.

The problem with diabetes is that it's a silent killer (type 2, I mean which is 85%). The diabetes sufferer, in conjunction with their doctor, can take charge and 'get their life back', as much as they wish to.
 

Laura

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FOTCM Member
Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

Well I was certainly interested to read this one. Having a condition referred to as "hyperinsulinism" (which runs in my family and is a precursor to diabetes) as well as fibromyalgia syndrome, I wonder if there is a relationship? One thing I noticed last year when I was being treated for a herniated disc was that the cortisone made me feel like I was practically newborn - all over. It was amazing. I realized that, since cortisone is a powerful anti-inflammatory, that all the aches and pains and brain fog that I was being relieved of at that moment must be due quite simply to inflammation. I then started to think about trying to locate exactly what it was that caused the inflammation. Well, of course, the doctors tell me I have osteo-arthritis, bone spurs, what-not. Fine. I want to know what causes it.

The cause, in my case, has long been thought to be wheat and corn sensitivity - that my body reacts to these substances as though they were some kind of poison and mounts a response. Well, it's pretty hard to live without eating wheat or corn since they are in almost everything. It's also a pretty cruel way to live. But the fact is, if I eat wheat or corn, I can feel it in my joints within hours: pain and stiffness. I had also begun to wonder if the problem with insulin was not due strictly to carbohydrates, but more due to the wheat/corn reaction.

I recently decided to try a product that someone suggested. It's called "Diamaxol" and you can read the promo stuff about it here:
http://www.micronutra.com/diamaxol.html

Well, it's pretty pricey there, but you can find it elsewhere a bit cheaper. I notice that among the ingredients listed on the bottle is "cayenne fruit." Perhaps this product acts similarly to the above mentioned research where it was said:

Suspecting a link between the nerves and diabetes, he and Dr. Salter used an old experimental trick -- injecting capsaicin, the active ingredient in hot chili peppers, to kill the pancreatic sensory nerves in mice that had an equivalent of Type 1 diabetes.
I believe that capsaicin is also active in cayenne pepper.

Then, there is the coconut oil thing that I was looking at here:

http://www.coconutoil-online.com/

Among the benefits of coconut oil: "coconut oil is good for diabetics since it not only does not contribute to the disease but in fact helps control blood sugar. A number of other references refer to the use of coconut oil in combating chronic fatigue, candida, and parasites as well as for skin and hair care"

So, since blood sugar fluctuations are a real problem for me, I'll be trying the coconut oil too.

It's a pretty exciting discovery if you ask me!
 

Mr. Premise

The Living Force
Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

Yes, Cayenne has capsaicin. Capsaicin is what makes hot peppers hot. What else does Daimaxol have in it? Maybe you could replicate the formula more cheaply. Turmeric is a good anti-inflammatory, too. Maybe a teaspoon of turmeric and a teaspoon of cayenne powder (both are cheap) stirred into water, drunk with a water chaser, would help, maybe not instead of, but in addition to.
 

Gaby

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Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

This is very interesting, as diabetes is really nasty and widespread. Capsaicin its been used in diabetes to treat one of its painful complications (neuropathy), as it acts on Substance P which is a neurotransmitter of pain.

Laura said:
I recently decided to try a product that someone suggested. It's called "Diamaxol" and you can read the promo stuff about it here:
http://www.micronutra.com/diamaxol.html

Well, it's pretty pricey there, but you can find it elsewhere a bit cheaper. I notice that among the ingredients listed on the bottle is "cayenne fruit." Perhaps this product acts similarly to the above mentioned research where it was said:

Suspecting a link between the nerves and diabetes, he and Dr. Salter used an old experimental trick -- injecting capsaicin, the active ingredient in hot chili peppers, to kill the pancreatic sensory nerves in mice that had an equivalent of Type 1 diabetes.
I believe that capsaicin is also active in cayenne pepper.
So yeah, maybe the research from Toronto brought a potential mechanism of action of diamaxol which is not known, kind of a "side effect". From http://sulcus.berkeley.edu/mcb/165_001/papers/manuscripts/_209.html

Capsaicin binding releases calcium ion and produces depletion of substance P from primary sensory neurons, causing desensitization. An overload of capsaicin may lead to cell death as a result of too much cytosolic calcium
Capsaicin has also antiinflammatory properties.

Hm, good stuff
 

Rhansen

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

Laura said:
Having a condition referred to as "hyperinsulinism"
I don't know exactly what your diet is, but when researching a few years back I came across "The Protein Power Lifeplan" by Dr.'s Eades (highly recommended reading) in which they mention that insulin insensitivity can be caused by the body using trans fats to manufacture the cell (insulin) receptors, especially when there is a shortage of omega 3 fats in the diet. The resulting receptors are a "poor fit" causing the excess secretion of insulin.
Omega 3 fats are also reputed to have anti-inflammitory properties. Again, I don't know that this is (or is not) your problem but I thought I would mention it.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

A slightly different explanation of the research in other news.

http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2006/12/14/diabetes-neuron.html#skip300x250

From http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn10812-breakthrough-sheds-light-on-cause-of-diabetes.html

Michael Dosch at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and colleagues, had previously shown that not only islet cells, but the nerve tissue around them was affected as diabetes set in. For this reason, they suspected that certain sensory nerves of the pancreas might be involved. These nerves release a neuropeptide called "substance P" and are usually responsible for ensuring that islet cells produce the right amount of insulin.

The researchers used a chemical to obliterate these nerves in a breed of mice genetically predestined to develop diabetes. “It turns out if you remove these specific sensory nerves, the animals don’t get diabetes,� says Dosch. “It was stunning.�
Single injection

When the researchers examined the nerves of diabetes-prone mice and compared them with normal mice, they found that the nerves of diabetes-prone mice do not producing enough substance P. This causes islet cells to overproduce insulin, leading to insulin-resistance and eventually islet-cell death. It is at this point, says Dosch, that the immune system is called into action, triggering diabetes.

The team wanted to know what would happen if they gave diabetic mice a top-up of substance P, so they injected some directly into the pancreas. Astonishingly, the diabetes disappeared overnight and the mice remained diabetes-free for weeks, and even months in some cases.

If the same were to happen in humans, a single injection could keep the disease at bay for years, says Dosch.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Diabetes in America(comic)

starving_china_600.jpg

http://www(dot)NewsTarget(dot)com/021505.html
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Meta-analysis show superiority of lower-carb diets in diabetes

At least some "mainstream" doctors use their common sense...

Via http://www.drbriffa.com/blog/2008/01/11/meta-analysis-show-superiority-of-lower-carb-diets-in-diabetes-but-further-studies-said-to-be-needed-why/

Meta-analysis show superiority of lower-carb diets in diabetes, but further studies said to be needed. Why?

The primary problem sufferers of diabetes have is that their bodies don’t handle sugar (glucose) well. Part of the problem here is that ‘excess’ sugar in the body can attach itself to tissues, which damages them. As a result, diabetics are at an increased risk of a variety of conditions including nerve damage, blood vessel damage and kidney disease. Generally speaking, diabetes impacts on both quality and quantity of life.

As I have pointed out before, official recommendations regarding what diabetics should eat have generally focused on the need to eat a ‘low fat’ diet, and to include starchy foods (like bread, potatoes, pasta, rice and breakfast cereal) with every meal. Because these foods tend to cause brisk and substantial release of sugar into the body, and because blood sugar control is the primary underlying problem in diabetes, common sense would dictate that conventional nutritional advice for diabetics is somewhat, how shall we put it, misguided.

So, for quite some time now at least some practitioners and individuals with diabetes have been eschewing the low fat, high carb diets traditionally recommended to them. Instead, they’ve been opting for lower carb regimes. I am one of those practitioners, and my experience with carb-restricted diets is that they are generally effective for controlling blood sugar and reducing the need for medication (sometimes, it eliminates it altogether).

But those in the medical and scientific community are, I’ve found, not so interested in common sense and people’s personal experience: what they want is science. I’ve noticed generally that an approach appears to be counter to conventional ‘wisdom’, doctors and scientists generally ‘demand’ science that validates it. On the other hand, for approaches that are ‘accepted’ as beneficial, no such demands are made. Never mind that for a moment, let’s get back to the science…

I was interested to read a study published earlier this month, which assessed the effects of ‘restricted carbohydrate’ diets in the management of diabetes. This study amassed the data from 13 individuals studies, in which a lower carb diet was pitted against a higher carb diet. Actually, the lower carb diets used in these experiments ranged in carbohydrate content from 4 to 45 per cent. So, while some were genuinely low in carb, others were not.

Even so, this study found that compared to higher carb diets, lower carb regimes led to significant improvements in a number of measures, namely fasting blood glucose, levels of HBA1c (which gives an indication of blood sugar control over the last 2-3 months), and levels of unhealthy blood fats known as triglycerides. Overall, blood sugar levels fell by 15 per cent, HbA1c levels by 9.4 per cent, and triglyceride levels dropped by a third. Do bear in mind that some of diets which gave these results were not actually what some would term ‘restricted carbohydrate’.

Nevertheless, the results speak for themselves, I think. However, the authors of this study conclude that there insufficient evidence for carbohydrate restricted diets to be recommended. They also call for further research into the long term safety of such diets. If the results had been different, and the study had found that higher carb diets were superior, I wonder whether they’d be a call for further research? I think we know the answer. When it comes to changing a paradigm in medicine, it seems that not only will common sense not suffice, good science won’t do either.

References:

Kirk JK, et al. Restricted-carbohydrate diets in patients with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2008;108:91-100
 

Laura

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Meta-analysis show superiority of lower-carb diets in diabetes

Yeah, amazing, isn't it?

And it's not just diabetics that benefit from the low/restricted carb diets. People with blood type O should really limit carbs and people with "hypogylycemia" or hyperinsulinism. I find that I feel best keeping the level to right around 10 to 15 grams of carbs per day. My body feels better and more energetic, my mind is sharper, aches and pains diminish, and so on.

Yeah, that's a pretty low amount of carbs, but it really works for me. I've almost adjusted to the fact that this is the way life should be for a type O with hyperinsulinism... forever. It's not easy, but it can be done. The upside is that you CAN have about all the fat you want and it really doesn't make you gain weight - as long as there are no carbs!!!

That means you can have ice-cream made with real cream (no milk) and stevia!!! A little vanilla and lemon zest, and YUM!

Cocoa with cream and stevia...

And even though pork is generally considered to be bad for all blood types, I still love my bacon and eggs!
 

nainasingh

A Disturbance in the Force
People with diabetes can't eat anything sweet.

I came across this article it is really interesting but then it puts me in all doubts

People with diabetes can't eat anything sweet.
Relax -- despite what you may have heard, a piece of cake or a couple of cookies won't cause a health crisis. In fact, sweets can be eaten in moderation by people with type 2 diabetes, if eaten as part of a healthy meal plan and combined with exercise, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Still, while avoiding sweet treats isn't mandatory, limiting them is. Sweets often contain not only empty calories but a lot of sugar, a carbohydrate that raises glucose levels considerably. For better glucose control, diabetics should have dessert only after a low-carb meal. It's important to eat that chicken breast, broccoli, and salad before dishing into some ice cream.

there is more in the article that make me wonder.
http://www.caring.com/articles/diabetes-myths
i want to know can i take this in consideration

thanks you
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: People with diabetes can't eat anything sweet.

Hi Nainasingh

Welcome to the forum. We encourage new users to post an introduction about themselves and how they found there way here in the Newbies Forum (no need to post anything personal).

Please be aware that although we discuss health issues this is not the primary concern of this forum (please double check the Forum Guidelines), nor do we suggest what anyone should do regarding their own health. Like everything here we encourage members to read, search (the forum search button is most useful) and if your understanding is unclear after searching discuss your conclusions and data.

Having said that, a good place to start is the sticky threads. i.e.
Fasting, Gluten, MSG, Soy, Blood Type Diet
Anti-Candida, Inflammation, Heavy Metals Detox and Diet
UltraMind Solution Quizzes

Also the Recommended Books thread has a Health section.

nainasingh said:
I came across this article it is really interesting but then it puts me in all doubts [...]
i want to know can i take this in consideration

Perhaps you can explain what you are in doubt about?
 

dugdeep

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No Heart Disease or Diabetes From Red Meat, But From Processed Meat...

From http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/2010-releases/processed-meats-unprocessed-heart-disease-diabetes.html

Press Releases
2010 Releases
Eating Processed Meats, but Not Unprocessed Red Meats, May Raise Risk of Heart Disease and Diabetes

For immediate release: Monday, May 17, 2010

Boston, MA—In a new study, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have found that eating processed meat, such as bacon, sausage or processed deli meats, was associated with a 42% higher risk of heart disease and a 19% higher risk of type 2 diabetes. In contrast, the researchers did not find any higher risk of heart disease or diabetes among individuals eating unprocessed red meat, such as from beef, pork, or lamb. This work is the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the worldwide evidence for how eating unprocessed red meat and processed meat relates to risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

sausages“Although most dietary guidelines recommend reducing meat consumption, prior individual studies have shown mixed results for relationships between meat consumption and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes,” said Renata Micha, a research fellow in the department of epidemiology at HSPH and lead author of the study. “Most prior studies also did not separately consider the health effects of eating unprocessed red versus processed meats.”

Watch a video of Micha describing the findings: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/multimedia/Video/2010/processedmeat/index.html

The study appears online May 17, 2010, on the website of the journal Circulation.

The researchers, led by Micha and HSPH colleagues Dariush Mozaffarian, assistant professor in the department of epidemiology and Sarah Wallace, junior research fellow in the department of epidemiology, systematically reviewed nearly 1,600 studies. Twenty relevant studies were identified, which included a total of 1,218,380 individuals from 10 countries on four continents (North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia).

The researchers defined unprocessed red meat as any unprocessed meat from beef, lamb or pork, excluding poultry. Processed meat was defined as any meat preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or with the addition of chemical preservatives; examples include bacon, salami, sausages, hot dogs or processed deli or luncheon meats. Vegetable or seafood protein sources were not evaluated in these studies.

The results showed that, on average, each 50 gram (1.8 oz) daily serving of processed meat (about 1-2 slices of deli meats or 1 hot dog) was associated with a 42% higher risk of developing heart disease and a 19% higher risk of developing diabetes. In contrast, eating unprocessed red meat was not associated with risk of developing heart disease or diabetes. Too few studies evaluated the relationship between eating meat and risk of stroke to enable the researchers to draw any conclusions.

“Although cause-and-effect cannot be proven by these types of long-term observational studies, all of these studies adjusted for other risk factors, which may have been different between people who were eating more versus less meats,” said Mozaffarian. “Also, the lifestyle factors associated with eating unprocessed red meats and processed meats were similar, but only processed meats were linked to higher risk.”

“When we looked at average nutrients in unprocessed red and processed meats eaten in the United States, we found that they contained similar average amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol. In contrast, processed meats contained, on average, 4 times more sodium and 50% more nitrate preservatives,” said Micha. “This suggests that differences in salt and preservatives, rather than fats, might explain the higher risk of heart disease and diabetes seen with processed meats, but not with unprocessed red meats.”

Dietary sodium (salt) is known to increase blood pressure, a strong risk factor for heart disease. In animal experiments, nitrate preservatives can promote atherosclerosis and reduce glucose tolerance, effects which could increase risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Given the differences in health risks seen with eating processed meats versus unprocessed red meats, these findings suggest that these types of meats should be studied separately in future research for health effects, including cancer, the authors said. For example, higher intake of total meat and processed meat has been associated with higher risk of colorectal cancer, but unprocessed red meat has not been separately evaluated. They also suggest that more research is needed into which factors (especially salt and other preservatives) in meats are most important for health effects.

Current efforts to update the United States government’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which are often a reference for other countries around the world, make these findings particularly timely, the researchers say. They recommend that dietary and policy efforts should especially focus on reducing intake of processed meat.

“To lower risk of heart attacks and diabetes, people should consider which types of meats they are eating. Processed meats such as bacon, salami, sausages, hot dogs and processed deli meats may be the most important to avoid,” said Micha. “Based on our findings, eating one serving per week or less would be associated with relatively small risk.”

“Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” Renata Micha, Sarah K. Wallace, Dariush Mozaffarian, Circulation, online May 17, 2010.

The original study can be found here - http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.924977v1

Now all we need is a study comparing natural smoked or cured meats, without the use of nitrates, versus the garbage sold in the average grocery store. I know where I'd put my money :D
 
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