Dyatlov Pass incident

Seppo Ilmarinen

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Has anyone researched this case? Nine ski hikers were found dead in the northern Ural mountains at february 2, 1959. There seemed been reported some UFO activity in the area. Opinions?

"Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] Their clothing, when tested, was found to be highly radioactive"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_Pass_incident

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pp6POvlER4
 

zhahown

The Force is Strong With This One
Wow that's strange- there was an inciedent in the 1950's or 1960's that was similar- the missing body parts mainly.

There was one incident about a decade ago or so in South America- a body found naked & missing parts- extremely grotesque. "human mutilation" is is called-like cattle mutilation.

Quote from the wiki article:

"Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths. Access to the area was barred for skiers and other adventurers for three years after the incident.[1] The chronology of the incident remains unclear due to the lack of survivors.[2][3]

Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot into heavy snow and a temperature of −30°C. Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] Their clothing, when tested, was found to be highly radioactive.[1]"


The thing that resonates w/me is the part about "a compelling unknown force"- I've had many,many sightings in my life, one of which has shown evidence of compulsion from a non-physical source that resulted in me, at the time of the sighting, thinking nothing of later-realized extraordinary events, just shrugging it off & going back inside. Another sighting involved a STRONG feeling of something is in the room with me, which compelled me to go outside & look around. Sure enough- I had a sighting (although I knew I'd have one- it's difficult to explain, but it involved telepathic communication initiated by them- thelling me "we're going to teach you the mechan ics of contact")


Complulsion may be yet another part, exploitable in positive (in my case) or negative ways (in their case-yikes!) of "The Mechanics of Contact". I'm learning that TMOC involves pretty much everything in human society- their very presence changes us in nearly every way. If someone else hasn't already written a book called "The Mechanics of Contact", I may just have to! There's a lot involved in this subject- & it includes compulsion.
 

transientP

Jedi Council Member
Seppo Ilmarinen,

not two weeks ago a colleague was discussing this incident with me. first of all, it turns out that there is MUCH more information pertaining to the incident on the Russian language wiki page, which is here;
http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%93%D0%B8%D0%B1%D0%B5%D0%BB%D1%8C_%D1%82%D1%83%D1%80%D0%B3%D1%80%D1%83%D0%BF%D0%BF%D1%8B_%D0%94%D1%8F%D1%82%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0

if you aren't using a web browser that translates on-page, you can use google translate. i don't read russian myself but chrome (web-browser) translated not-too-shabbily.

there are many takes on what happened. obviously, it is a strange case, otherwise it wouldn't be famous.
one of the campers used to work at a power plant, and that is how some people explain the radioactivity found in the clothing. but obviously other elements of the case are exceedingly bizarre.
i got the feeling that something extra dimensional might have occurred, maybe even an "accident", but that is only a hunch from reading the material.

there is also claim that one if not more of the "campers" were ex-spies or were secret agents of one type or another.

enjoy reading.
 

happyliza

The Living Force
FWIW it seems that a book is being written about this. Not sure how much objective reality will be in it though.


Mountain of the Dead: The Dyatlov Pass Incident by Keith McCloskey (1 Jul 2013)
 

cpuxxx

The Force is Strong With This One
Dyatlov Pass incident 1959 ??



Hi everybody . I just found an accident in 1959. It is wierd . I wonder how this happened. Any Idea or any info From C's about this matter ?

Journalists reporting on the available parts of the inquest files claim that it states:
Six of the group members died of hypothermia and three of fatal injuries.
There were no indications of other people nearby apart from the nine travelers on Kholat Syakhl, nor anyone in the surrounding areas.
The tent had been ripped open from within.
The victims had died 6 to 8 hours after their last meal.
Traces from the camp showed that all group members left the camp of their own accord, on foot.
To dispel the theory of an attack by the indigenous Mansi people, Dr. Boris Vozrozhdenny stated that the fatal injuries of the three bodies could not have been caused by another human being, "because the force of the blows had been too strong and no soft tissue had been damaged".[2]
Forensic radiation tests had shown high doses of radioactive contamination on the clothes of a few victims.[2]
Released documents contained no information about the condition of the skiers’ internal organs.
The final verdict was that the group members all died because of a "compelling natural force".[1] The inquest ceased officially in May 1959 as a result of the "absence of a guilty party". The files were sent to a secret archive, and the photocopies of the case became available only in the 1990s, with some parts missing.[2][better source needed]

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_Pass

Thanx everydody
 
H

Hildegarda

Guest
coincidentally to this discussion, Yuri Yudin, the lone survivor of the Dyatlov expedition, passed away this weekend. He was 76. Back in 1959, he dropped out halfway through the hike due to illness, and went home. A few days later, his comrades were dead.
 

Pashalis

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I came across this Dyatlov Pass incident a few months ago and it is indeed one of the strangest and creepiest cases I've ever heard of.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Dyatlove Pass Incident - Uber Creepy


From Wikipedia:

The Dyatlov Pass incident resulted in the deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern Ural mountains on the night of February 2, 1959. It happened on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (Холат-Сяхыл) (a Mansi name, meaning Mountain of the Dead). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has since been named Dyatlov Pass (Перевал Дятлова) after the group's leader, Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов).

The lack of eyewitnesses has inspired much speculation. Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling natural force" had caused the deaths.[1] Access to the area was barred for skiers and other adventurers for three years after the incident.[2][better source needed] The chronology of the incident remains unclear because of the lack of survivors.[3][1]

Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot into heavy snow and a temperature of −30 °C (−22 °F). Although the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[2]

Background

A group was formed for a ski trek across the northern Urals in Sverdlovsk Oblast. The group, led by Igor Dyatlov, consisted of eight men and two women. Most were students or graduates of Ural Polytechnical Institute (Уральский Политехнический Институт, УПИ), now Ural State Technical University:

Igor Alekseievich Dyatlov (Игорь Алексеевич Дятлов), the group's leader, born January 13, 1936
Zinaida Alekseievna Kolmogorova (Зинаида Алексеевна Колмогорова), born January 12, 1937
Ludmila Alexandrovna Dubinina (Людмила Александровна Дубинина), born May 12, 1938
Alexander Sergeievich Kolevatov (Александр Сергеевич Колеватов), born November 16, 1934
Rustem Vladimirovich Slobodin (Рустем Владимирович Слободин), born January 11, 1936
Yuri Alexeievich Krivonischenko (Юрий Алексеевич Кривонищенко), born February 7, 1935
Yuri Nikolaievich Doroshenko (Юрий Николаевич Дорошенко), born January 29, 1938
Nicolai Vladimirovich Thibeaux-Brignolles (Николай Владимирович Тибо-Бриньоль), born July 5, 1935
Alexander Alexandrovich Zolotariov (Александр Александрович Золотарёв), born February 2, 1921
Yuri Yefimovich Yudin (Юрий Ефимович Юдин), born July 19, 1937, died April 27, 2013[4]

The goal of the expedition was to reach Otorten (Отортен), a mountain 10 kilometers north of the site of the incident. This route, at that season, was estimated as "Category III", the most difficult. All members were experienced in long ski tours and mountain expeditions.

The group arrived by train at Ivdel (Ивдель), a city at the center of the northern province of Sverdlovsk Oblast on January 25. They then took a truck to Vizhai (Вижай) - the last inhabited settlement so far north. They started their march toward Otorten from Vizhai on January 27. The next day, one of the members (Yuri Yudin) was forced to go back because of illness.[2] The group now consisted of nine people.

Diaries and cameras found around their last camp made it possible to track the group's route up to the day preceding the incident. On January 31, the group arrived at the edge of a highland area and began to prepare for climbing. In a wooded valley they cached surplus food and equipment that would be used for the trip back. The following day (February 1), the hikers started to move through the pass. It seems they planned to get over the pass and make camp for the next night on the opposite side, but because of worsening weather conditions, snowstorms and decreasing visibility, they lost their direction and deviated west, upward towards the top of Kholat Syakhyl. When they realized their mistake, the group decided to stop and set up camp there on the slope of the mountain rather than moving 1.5 kilometers downhill to a forested area which would have offered some shelter from the elements.[2] Yuri Yudin, the lone survivor, postulates that “Dyatlov probably did not want to lose the altitude they had gained, or he decided to practice camping on the mountain slope."[2]

Search and discovery

It had been agreed beforehand that Dyatlov would send a telegraph to their sports club as soon as the group returned to Vizhai (Вижай). It was expected that this would happen no later than February 12, but Dyatlov had told Yudin that he expected to be longer, and so when this date had passed and no messages had been received, there was no reaction—delays of a few days were common in such expeditions. Only after the relatives of the travelers demanded a rescue operation did the head of the institute send the first rescue groups, consisting of volunteer students and teachers, on February 20.[2] Later, the army and police forces became involved, with planes and helicopters being ordered to join the rescue operation.

On February 26, the searchers found the abandoned and badly damaged tent on Kholat Syakhl. Mikhail Sharavin, the student who found the tent, said “the tent was half torn down and covered with snow. It was empty, and all the group’s belongings and shoes had been left behind.”[2] Investigators said the tent had been cut open from inside. A chain of eight or nine sets of footprints, left by people who were wearing socks, a single shoe or were barefoot, could be followed and led down toward the edge of nearby woods (on the opposite side of the pass, 1.5 km north-east), but after 500 meters they were covered with snow. At the forest edge, under a large old cedar, the searchers found the remains of a fire, along with the first two bodies, those of Yuri Krivonischenko and Yuri Doroshenko, shoeless and dressed only in their underwear. The branches on the tree were broken up to five meters high, suggesting that a skier had climbed up to look for something, perhaps the camp. Between the cedar and the camp the searchers found three more corpses, Dyatlov, Zina Kolmogorova and Rustem Slobodin, who seemed to have died in poses suggesting that they were attempting to return to the tent.[2] They were found separately at distances of 300, 480 and 630 meters from the tree.

Searching for the remaining four travelers took more than two months. They were finally found on May 4 under four meters of snow in a ravine 75 meters farther into the woods from the cedar tree. These four were better dressed than the others, and there were signs that those who had died first had apparently relinquished their clothes to the others. Zolotaryov was wearing Dubinina’s faux fur coat and hat, while Dubinina’s foot was wrapped in a piece of Krivonishenko’s wool pants.

Investigation

A legal inquest had been started immediately after finding the first five bodies. A medical examination found no injuries which might have led to their deaths, and it was concluded that they had all died of hypothermia. Slobodin had a small crack in his skull, but it was not thought to be a fatal wound.

An examination of the four bodies which were found in May changed the picture. Three of them had fatal injuries: the body of Thibeaux-Brignolles had major skull damage, and both Dubunina and Zolotarev had major chest fractures. According to Dr. Boris Vozrozhdenny, the force required to cause such damage would have been extremely high. He compared it to the force of a car crash. Notably, the bodies had no external wounds, as if they were crippled by a high level of pressure. Dubunina was found to be missing her tongue.[2] There had initially been some speculation that the indigenous Mansi people might have attacked and murdered the group for encroaching upon their lands, but investigation indicated that the nature of their deaths did not support this thesis; the hikers' footprints alone were visible, and they showed no sign of hand-to-hand struggle.[2]

Although the temperature was very low, around −25 to −30 °C (−13 to −22 °F) with a storm blowing, the dead were only partially dressed. Some of them had only one shoe, while others had no shoes or wore only socks.[2] Some were found wrapped in snips of ripped clothes that seemed to have been cut from those who were already dead. However, up to 25 percent of hypothermia deaths are associated with so-called "Paradoxical undressing".[5] This typically occurs during moderate to severe hypothermia, as the person becomes disoriented, confused, and combative. They may begin discarding their clothing, which, in turn, increases the rate of heat loss.[6][7]

Avalanche damage is considered a possible explanation for this incident.[8] One scenario under this theory is that moving snow knocked down the tent, ruining the campsite in the night. The party then cut themselves free and mobilized. The snow would likely have contacted them and possibly ruined their boots and extra clothing. Being covered in wet snow in the sub-freezing temperatures created a serious hazard to survival, with possible exhaustion or unconsciousness from hypothermia possible in under 15 minutes.[9] Thibeaux-Brignolles, Dubunina, Zolotariov, and Kolevatov were moving farther from the site to find help despite their remote location when they fell in the ravine they were found in - three of these bodies had major fractures. Being the only bodies with major injuries and lying 13 feet deep in a ravine could be considered evidence that they fell.

Supporting factors for this theory are that avalanches are not uncommon on any slope that can accumulate snow. Despite claims that the area is not prone to avalanches,[10] slab avalanches do typically occur in new snow and where people are disrupting the snowpack.[11] On the night of the incident, snow was falling, the campsite was situated on a slope, and the campers were disrupting the stability of the snowpack. The tent was also halfway torn down and partially covered with snow - all of which could support the theory of a small avalanche pushing snow into the tent.

Possibly negating the avalanche scenario would be that the investigators saw footprints leading from the campsite, and no obvious avalanche damage was noted. However, the footprints could have been preserved if there was no precipitation in the 25 days before the site was discovered and the supposed avalanche happened after most of the snow fell.

Journalists reporting on the available parts of the inquest files claim that it states:

Six of the group members died of hypothermia and three of fatal injuries.

There were no indications of other people nearby apart from the nine travelers on Kholat Syakhl, nor anyone in the surrounding areas.

The tent had been ripped open from within.

The victims had died 6 to 8 hours after their last meal.

Traces from the camp showed that all group members left the camp of their own accord, on foot.

To dispel the theory of an attack by the indigenous Mansi people, Dr. Boris Vozrozhdenny stated that the fatal injuries of the three bodies could not have been caused by another human being, "because the force of the blows had been too strong and no soft tissue had been damaged".[2]

Forensic radiation tests had shown high doses of radioactive contamination on the clothes of a few victims.[2]

Released documents contained no information about the condition of the skiers’ internal organs.

The final verdict was that the group members all died because of a "compelling natural force".[1] The inquest ceased officially in May 1959 as a result of the "absence of a guilty party". The files were sent to a secret archive, and the photocopies of the case became available only in the 1990s, with some parts missing.[2]

Controversy surrounding investigation

Some researchers claim some facts were missed, perhaps ignored, by officials:[3][1]

12-year-old Yury Kuntsevich, who would later become head of the Yekaterinburg-based Dyatlov Foundation (see below), attended five of the hikers' funerals and recalls their skin had a "deep brown tan".[2]

The hikers' clothing was found to be highly radioactive.[2]

Another group of hikers (about 50 kilometers south of the incident) reported that they saw strange orange spheres in the night sky to the north (likely in the direction of Kholat Syakhl) on the night of the incident.[2] Similar "spheres" were observed in Ivdel and adjacent areas continually during the period of February to March 1959, by various independent witnesses (including the meteorology service and the military).[2] These were later proven to be launches of R-7 intercontinental missiles by Eugene Buyanov.[12]

Some reports suggest that there was a great deal of scrap metal in the area, leading to speculation that the military had utilized the area secretly and might have been engaged in a cover-up.[2]

The last camp of Dyatlov group was located on direct way from Baikonur Cosmodrome (from where some test launches of intercontinental missile R-7 were executed) to Chyornaya Guba, Novaya Zemlya archipelago (where was major nuclear testing ground of the Soviet Union).

Aftermath

In 1967, Sverdlovsk writer and journalist Yuri Yarovoi (Юрий Яровой) published the novel Of the highest rank of complexity (Высшей категории трудности)[13] which was inspired by this incident. Yarovoi had been involved in the search for Dyatlov's group and at the inquest, including acting as an official photographer for the search campaign and in the initial stage of the investigation, and so had insight into the events. The book was written in the Soviet era when the details of the accident were kept secret, and Yarovoi avoided revealing anything beyond the official position and well-known facts. The book romanticized the accident and had a much more optimistic end than the real events – only the group leader was found deceased. Yarovoi's colleagues say that he had alternative versions of the novel, but both were declined because of censorship. Since Yarovoi's death in 1980 all his archives, including photos, diaries and manuscripts, have been lost.

Some details of the tragedy became publicly available in 1990 following publications and discussions in Sverdlovsk's regional press. One of the first authors was Sverdlovsk journalist Anatoly Guschin (Анатолий Гущин). Guschin reported that police officials gave him special permission to study the original files of the inquest and use these materials in his publications. He noticed that a number of pages were excluded from the files, as was a mysterious "envelope" mentioned in the case materials list. At the same time photocopies of some of the case files started to circulate among other unofficial researchers.

Guschin summarized his research in the book The Price of State Secrets is Nine Lives (Цена гостайны - девять жизней).[1] Some researchers criticized it due to its concentration on the speculative theory of a "Soviet secret weapon experiment", but the publication aroused the public discussion, stimulated by interest in the paranormal. Indeed, many of those who remained silent for 30 years reported new facts about the accident. One of them was the former police officer Lev Ivanov (Лев Иванов), who led the official inquest in 1959. In 1990 he published an article[14] along with his admission that the investigation team had no rational explanation of the accident. He also reported that he received direct orders from high-ranking regional officials to dismiss the inquest and keep its materials secret after reporting that the team had seen "flying spheres". Ivanov personally believes in a paranormal explanation - specifically, UFOs.

In 2000, a regional TV company produced the documentary film The Mystery of Dyatlov Pass (Тайна Перевала Дятлова). With the help of the film crew, a Yekaterinburg writer, Anna Matveyeva (Анна Матвеева), published the fiction/documentary novella of the same name.[3] A large part of the book includes broad quotations from the official case, diaries of victims, interviews with searchers and other documentaries collected by the film-makers. The narrative line of the book details the everyday life and thoughts of a modern woman (an alter ego of the author herself) who attempts to resolve the case.

Despite its fictional narrative, Matveyeva's book remains the largest source of documentary materials ever made available to the public regarding the incident. In addition, the pages of the case files and other documentaries (in photocopies and transcripts) are gradually published on a web forum for enthusiastic researchers.[15]

The Dyatlov Foundation has been founded in Yekaterinburg, with the help of Ural State Technical University, led by Yuri Kuntsevitch (Юрий Кунцевич). The foundation's aim is to convince current Russian officials to reopen the investigation of the case, and to maintain the "Dyatlov Museum" to perpetuate the memory of the dead hikers.
 

Pashalis

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Re: Dyatlove Pass Incident - Uber Creepy

It was/is discussed here:
http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,27071.msg328734.html#msg328734
 

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Though this incident has signatures of UFO critters ( radio active clothing, bone internal breaking, censorship )this reminds me of this session
941119
Q: (L) Say a person was sailing along in the Bermuda Triangle and the window was blasted open and these people passed through or were engulfed in it or whatever, in
what condition would they find themselves?
A: Something akin to suspended animation.
Q: (L) Would they be conscious of their state of suspended animation or would their consciousness also be suspended?
A: Either or.
Q: (L) Do they stay in this state forever, or do they come back out, or do they come out somewhere else?
A: Open. All are possible. Same thing happened to Philadelphia experiment participants.
Q: (L) If an individual were in this interdimensional state of suspended animation, does this mean they are stuck there forever?
A: Maybe.
Q: (L) Can they not die, is that what you are saying?
A: To them they may perceive something like waiting for millions of years.
Q: (L) Is there no one or no way to rescue them from this state?
A: Why do you think those sailors were hopelessly insane?
Q: (L) Besides the crystal in the Bermuda Triangle, are any of the others still active?
A: Yes.
Q: (T) Does the government know about them?
A: Semi.
Q: (L) Where are the others located?
A: Off Japan; in Brazil; in Ural mountains of Russia; North and South Poles.
 

Olesya

Jedi Master
The Ural mountains is a mysterious place indeed. Here http://www.dopotopa.com/n_subbotin_chud_i_divnye_ludi_uralskih_gor.html it says: "Usually Ural region of Russia and Siberia and Republic of Komi are associated with legends about Chud race– the "white-eyed people" who went to live underground fleeing from the invasion of the christian infidels. Although in the ancient historical writings and ethnographic studies of the 18-19 centuries, one can find a lot of reference to the Div'i people... From the time immemorial Chud race and Div'i people were one tribe (clan, blood family?). They considered Churila Dyuevich and Tarusa being their ancestors. It is believed that many Aryan and Finnish tribes originated from them.. according to the legends, the split between them (Chud and Div'i) was caused by religious motives. After the battle between Svarog and Duya some of the people (Div'i) came down with Duya to the underground cities. The Panu (it's interesting that in many languages "pan" has a meaning akin to the meaning of the word "lord") who originated from Pan Vieyich and and lived there (in the underground cities that is) from time immemorial were helping them to settle in the underground cities. Chud (Chudskoi) people went to live in the caves a little bit later on, right before the inclusion of the Ural region into the Moscow kingdom".

The ethnographer A. Onuchkov (1928) gave a short description of the physical appearance of the Div'i people looked, mentioning an interesting fact: " Div'i live in Ural mountains; they come to the surface through openings in the caves; in ... Kaslyah they come out from the mountains and walk among the people who don't notice them. Their culture is greatest of all and the light inside the mountains, where they live, is as bright as the sun. Div'i have a small stature, very beautiful in appearance and have a pleasant voice. Not everyone can hear them, only chosen people; they predict various future events to the people."

In modern Russian language "chudo" means wonder, miracle. The ethymology of the world "chud" is unclear. Here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chud#Chudes_in_chronicles it says: "..."chude" could be derived from the Slavic word "tjudjo" (which mean foreign or strange) which in turn is derived from the Gothic word meaning "folk". Another hypothesis is that the term was derived from a transformation of Finno-Ugric name for Wood Grouse. Yet another hypothesis contends that is derived from Sami word "tshudde", meaning an enemy or adversary.

"Divo" means basically the same, although it's not that frequently used nowadays. Here http://indoeuro.bizland.com/project/phonetics/word30.html it says that "div" has Indo-European roots as "deiwo". Meanings: a deity, a god, a daylight God. This root can be found in many languages, meaning basically the same with positive connotation as "wonderful". Although, in Serbo-Croatian, while "divan" means wonderful, 'div" means demon. later, in notes it is written that "this is believed to have been the name of the principal Indo-European deity, the god of thunder and war, originally the god of daylight... The only language which translates this stem with a negative meaning is Avestan: Iranians considered Devas an Aryan deity, and as Aryans are always considered as enemies in Old Iranian mythology, their god acquired the meaning of 'a demon''.

Many Russian folk tales describe a battle between "chudo-yudo whale fish" or "chudo-yudo" dragon and Russian bogatyrs ( akin to a West European knights-errants).

In Ural folk stories (written by Pavel Bazhov) there is a famous character of the Queen of the Mountain. The story http://askural.com/2012/02/russian-legends/ goes like this:

" The Queen of the Copper Mountain is a beautiful young lady who owns all the treasures hidden in the Ural Mountains. Very few people met her because she turns into a lizard every time a man comes up. There was one lucky man though: Danila, a local miner. The Queen of the Copper Mountain fell in love with him. She showed him where her gold was, in return Danila had to stay with her deep underground. The man refused for he had a fiancée at home. The Queen was kind enough to let Danila go. She even gave him a present for his fiancée. As Danila got back home he gave the present, a malachite box full of treasures, to his future bride.
However, he never married the girl, for he went insane and for the rest of his days he was dreaming of the Queen of the Copper Mountain…"

There is interesting connection, OSIT, between these legends, balls of fires reported being seen in this region (also mentioned as one of the possible explanations for the death of Dyatlov's group), strange horrifying noises resembling the roar of the giant infuriated bull or, in some instances, a sound of a giant working machine, unexplained appearances of the people in military uniforms, magnetic anomaly, use of crystals by Atlantean and the nation of "the third eye", who've lived underground, mentioned by C's ( and in the "hemochromatosis and Blood lines" thread).
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
PerihelionX said:
Wild animals will often eat the tongue first. That's my small contribution to this mystery.
But once they do that, they also do other damage, at the very least, to the face. There was no report of the face being torn up.
 
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