Ever Given container ship aground in the Suez Canal

Mike

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Having some experience at sea and experience going through canals, chokepoints, and whatnot, this is gnawing at me about the ship that went aground in the Suez Canal. I've never gone through the Suez, but have gone through the Panama Canal, Strait of Malacca (biggest Asian waterway), Strait of Gibraltar (in and out of the Mediterranean Sea), and the Strait of Hormuz (passage into and out of the Persian Gulf). Take a look at this picture. Does this look like a strong wind pushing the ship aground or does it look more like right full rudder?

Evergreen ship.png

From the BBC article (link) and the only explanation I seen given: “Evergreen Marine said the ship was "suspected of being hit by a sudden strong wind, causing the hull to deviate... and accidentally hit the bottom and run aground".


I’d imagine the ship would have a pilot onboard that is an expert on the Suez and maneuvering in it, etc and the ship would be manned for restricted maneuvering (all hands-on deck – aft steering manned, etc in case there are engineering or steering mechanical casualties). The pilot would be the person giving commands in terms of engine orders and rudder movements and interacting directly with the Captain of the ship.

And I also remember that the ship’s profile above the water, etc can act as a sail for the wind to catch, but that is not, IMO, going to push the bow 30 degrees… 45 degrees in such a short distance and space. Yet, we have seen weather on the planet get strange and very uncharacteristic at times in the recent past.

Also, if I remember right from my Navy days when you go aground like this you do not try to maneuver, since you may just make things worse, so the ship may in general be angled and in the same position when the ship went aground.

And anyone with time in a military navy knows the significance of shutting off chokepoints at sea and whatnot in relation to strategic maneuvers related to conflicts and wars, which the Suez Canal is one of the most important.

Seems to me to some degree that the world by sea just got cut in half. Shut off the Strait of Gibraltar, as well, and you hamper activities at sea if anything happens in Syria and/or the Ukraine. And then maybe a little ‘helter skelter’ with the Bosphorus strait and…

There is also the significance to commerce and the supply chain of goods and oil to Europe and the eastern US, etc. This is just another thing to pile on top of very real problems with the supply chain of the world.

I messaged a friend who has gone through the Suez a few times and he also shares that same opinion that things don’t seem to add up with the given explanation of a sudden strong wind. They have specific safety precautions in place in case ships have rudder or engine issues or casualties during passage and those precautions both on and off ship might have to be violated for something like this to happen.

Maybe it was a strong wind, but something possibly smells to me.
 

Mike

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
In all likelihood just a coincidence in terms of the 'drawing'. Ships usually try to arrive early to such places as the entrance to the Suez, since they will likely have a time given to be there to receive the pilot. So you have a choice to anchor or steam around (possibly in an assigned area or box), until it is your turn to go through. Then there are all sorts of fishing boats and such you have to make sure you avoid, etc while you are waiting, so although you may have a pattern you are 'driving' while in your box or safe area to maneuver it will change given circumstances. So I don't think the 'drawing' has any significance.
 
Maybe it was a strong wind, but something possibly smells to me.
Agreed. An article popped up on Container News (need login to read) that discusses how the Ever Given managed to wedge itself. Here's an animation posted in the article:


Another statement is expected by officials as to the root cause. So far as you mentioned it seems it was windy and it just over compensated. Here's some snippets from the article:
An AIS animation of the moments before the accident show Ever Given steaming north at around 13kn in the middle of the channel with high east south-easterly winds. The vessel corrects its course to the west, but clips the bank over-compensating as it turns toward the east bank, ploughing into the bank at around 12kn.

A maritime expert, viewing the AIS animation told Container News, “She’s to the right initially. Then tries to come out to the middle but overshoots to port. There appear to be high winds from ESE [east south east]. She tried to get away from west side and attempts to come to middle, overshoots and ran aground.”

While it my have been Mother Nature, I'm also not discounting disaster capitalists are seeing an opportunity to accelerate their plans...

FWIW - I'm also tracking this stuff on a thread I created - Ports of Unrest - Navigating Full Spectrum Dominance and the Great Reset
 

BHelmet

Dagobah Resident
Many possible agendas this SNAFU supports. Food chain disruption used to weaken the population and create more dependence on big brother. Props up oil prices which props up stock market which is massively profitable to the big banks. An excuse for the inevitable inflation that is gradually becoming more noticeable as money printing continues at full steam.

The pattern drawn by the ships course is a big FU in the global birth canal if you want to see it that way. In yo face for those with eyes that see it.

The timing is too perfect. Another turn of the screw on humanity. Another false flag to follow?

When I put all the pieces on the table; all the agendas and possible conspiracies and what the C’s have said it looks like it boils down to one overarching chicken little hysteria:

They are trying to kill us.

Slowly, methodically and without it being noticed by the sleeping masses.

I know that sounds a bit melodramatic but.... that seems to be what the dots add up to if connected.
 

Aquarian1962

Padawan Learner
Having some experience at sea and experience going through canals, chokepoints, and whatnot, this is gnawing at me about the ship that went aground in the Suez Canal. I've never gone through the Suez, but have gone through the Panama Canal, Strait of Malacca (biggest Asian waterway), Strait of Gibraltar (in and out of the Mediterranean Sea), and the Strait of Hormuz (passage into and out of the Persian Gulf). Take a look at this picture. Does this look like a strong wind pushing the ship aground or does it look more like right full rudder?

View attachment 44023

From the BBC article (link) and the only explanation I seen given: “Evergreen Marine said the ship was "suspected of being hit by a sudden strong wind, causing the hull to deviate... and accidentally hit the bottom and run aground".


I’d imagine the ship would have a pilot onboard that is an expert on the Suez and maneuvering in it, etc and the ship would be manned for restricted maneuvering (all hands-on deck – aft steering manned, etc in case there are engineering or steering mechanical casualties). The pilot would be the person giving commands in terms of engine orders and rudder movements and interacting directly with the Captain of the ship.

And I also remember that the ship’s profile above the water, etc can act as a sail for the wind to catch, but that is not, IMO, going to push the bow 30 degrees… 45 degrees in such a short distance and space. Yet, we have seen weather on the planet get strange and very uncharacteristic at times in the recent past.

Also, if I remember right from my Navy days when you go aground like this you do not try to maneuver, since you may just make things worse, so the ship may in general be angled and in the same position when the ship went aground.

And anyone with time in a military navy knows the significance of shutting off chokepoints at sea and whatnot in relation to strategic maneuvers related to conflicts and wars, which the Suez Canal is one of the most important.

Seems to me to some degree that the world by sea just got cut in half. Shut off the Strait of Gibraltar, as well, and you hamper activities at sea if anything happens in Syria and/or the Ukraine. And then maybe a little ‘helter skelter’ with the Bosphorus strait and…

There is also the significance to commerce and the supply chain of goods and oil to Europe and the eastern US, etc. This is just another thing to pile on top of very real problems with the supply chain of the world.

I messaged a friend who has gone through the Suez a few times and he also shares that same opinion that things don’t seem to add up with the given explanation of a sudden strong wind. They have specific safety precautions in place in case ships have rudder or engine issues or casualties during passage and those precautions both on and off ship might have to be violated for something like this to happen.

Maybe it was a strong wind, but something possibly smells to me.
Something that caught my eye was the name "Evergreen" . That is the second time in a week I have seen that name, the second being a nursing home that just recently went up in flames.... and was named Evergreen nursing home. Everyone who commented on the nursing home story kept bringing up the name because "Evergreen" is Hillary Clinton's code name with the Secret Service. Yes, probably coincidence, but then again..... I am starting to think there are just too many freaking coincidences.
 

itellsya

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I think Ever Given is the name of the ship whilst Evergreen is the name of the company:

...
Eight tug boats are currently working to drag the 400m (1,312ft) Ever Given to deeper water after it ran aground and blocked one of the world's busiest shipping lanes on Tuesday morning.
...
Firm Evergreen Marine said the shipowner told them it "was suspected of being hit by a sudden strong wind, causing the hull to deviate from the waterway and accidentally hit the bottom and run aground".
...

 
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