Gongs and Comets?

dantem

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Stumbled on a video about musical gongs, and after watching this one in particular an idea came to mind, what if gongs were used in ancient times to replicate Heavenly sounds, or comets striking the atmosphere?


The guy in the video is grasping also little balls on a stick to produce those sounds, and he did not punch or hit the gong directly, but produce the effect by drawing a line on the gong's surface, so the association with the, more or less, linear path of a comet comes to mind...

A gong is a big metallic disk, and the Earth's atmosphere is in a way a big curved disk of ionized gases, from the point of view of a ball entering from outer space, so...

Seems also that gongs are ancient musical instruments too, mostly of Asian origin dating back to 3500 BC, there are Nepali gongs, Cambodian gongs, all quite old, so it could be quite a tradition going on.
 

Joe

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Good lord! Some of the sounds are like the "Mysterious Sky Sounds" that have been being heard over the past 5 to 10 years or so!!!

Yeah, not to mention that 'metallic scraping' sounds that are reported at UFO sightings/activity. There's something going on with waves and frequency and the resonance they produce in material objects here that unites all 3.
 

Michael B-C

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Thanks dantem. Wow! Indeed as Laura and Joe say, a way of imitating, answering and honoring the sound of the approaching sky gods.

And of course warning!

Brings to mind the sound made 3,500 years later by the 1st BC Loughnashade Horn discovered in 1794 in a bog – the former lake of Loughnashade. The lake is situated close to the important Iron Age royal complex of the Ulster Kings at Emain Macha, or Navan Fort, in Co. Armagh, Ireland. This site is intimately linked with comet mythology and has some astonishing parallels with Gobekli tepi (something I'll try and propose on another thread anon).

Anyway, there were four originally found - a very important clue - but only one now survives though its been copied to try and create some sense of the sound they might have made together even in duet.

Similarities to the gong sounds?

 

lilies

The Living Force
Gong video: Tibetan orchestra heavy stone levitation technology. Also how the pyramids were built, I think. Making large stone cubes easy to drag up & heap onto each other, because suddenly the gigantic stones were weighing less and were singing all the while, just like the C's mentioned in case of Stonehenge: singing stones.

You may want to ask the C's next time, if this gong technology has any power [in a geometric configuration how they did it in Tibet] to produce directed anti-gravity effects and a lot more? Maybe drastic human body tissue regeneration?

G.'s Alla Attapan comes to mind, how a complex piano-like instrument was able to produce physiological changes on human tissue by simply producing a resonance made of a combination of sound waves.
 

lilies

The Living Force
Anyway, there were four originally found - a very important clue - but only one now survives though its been copied to try and create some sense of the sound they might have made together even in duet.

I think this technology - combining the sound vibrations of four horns comes from elsewhere, from another civilization, far-far away.
 

dantem

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Brings to mind the sound made 3,500 years later by the 1st BC Loughnashade Horn discovered in 1794 in a bog – the former lake of Loughnashade. The lake is situated close to the important Iron Age royal complex of the Ulster Kings at Emain Macha, or Navan Fort, in Co. Armagh, Ireland. This site is intimately linked with comet mythology and has some astonishing parallels with Gobekli tepi (something I'll try and propose on another thread anon).

Anyway, there were four originally found - a very important clue - but only one now survives though its been copied to try and create some sense of the sound they might have made together even in duet.

Similarities to the gong sounds?

Wow! The circular shape of these trumpets is really something... Maybe some of these sounds are generated by a sort of electric friction in the higher strata of the atmosphere, producing a more metallic and 'gong-like' effect, then at much lower altitudes, where air, oxigen, nitrogen, CO2 et all is pierced through, you get a trumpet-like one, more airy one...

Yesterday I was into a thread of youtube videos about the most crazy sounds you can produce with the most implausible object, like playing Mozart with glasses, Bach with rocks, pipes with a lattice glove and so on, so I've just got that there are infinite ways to 'extract' sounds effects, nice notes and tunes from any surface and material that you can't even try to guess.
 

Jones

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I wonder if the upright stones at places like stone henge ever supported gongs.

I suppose a singing bowl could produce similar sound effects if it was big enough and had the right implements or techniques used on it.


Or urns?:

July 19, 1997.
Q: Yes. I also found the Solloi priesthood and the priestesses called Peleiades. They seem to be involved with urns, birds, tinkling bells, urns that can be struck and which then set up a particular resonance in other urns, oak trees, and some other peculiar references that relate to laurel trees...

A: Siren song.

Q: What about the siren song?

A: Greek mythology.

Q: I know that. What about it? What do the sirens represent?

A: Laura, my dear, if you really want to reveal "many beautiful and amazing things," all you need to do is remember the triad, the trilogy, the trinity, and look always for the triplicative connecting clue profile. Connect the threes... do not rest until you have found three beautifully balancing meanings!!
 
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