Incredibly Effective Protection from Fukushima Nuclear Radiation Effects

griffin

Jedi Master
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What's up with this? http://www.sott.net/articles/show/251715-Incredibly-Effective-Protection-from-Fukushima-Nuclear-Radiation-Effects

Is this "Liposomal Vitamin C" effective? Or is it just quackery masquerading as alternative medicine? Does anyone have insight about or experience with this?

My apologies if this topic has already been covered previously elsewhere here.
 

Renaissance

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Did you do a search? There is a good thread on Vitamin C here that should answer some of your questions about it. It doesn't specifically address much about protection from radiation in the thread, but it describe the power of it in other areas. There are other articles on SOTT that specifically address protection from radiation; doing a search brings up these:

Vitamin C Prevents Radiation Damage

Fukushima Radiation Release Worse than You Have Been Told, Large Doses of Vitamin C Important

Vitamin C Mops Up the Nuclear Age
 

griffin

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Shane said:
Did you do a search? There is a good thread on Vitamin C here that should answer some of your questions about it. It doesn't specifically address much about protection from radiation in the thread, but it describe the power of it in other areas. There are other articles on SOTT that specifically address protection from radiation; doing a search brings up these:

Vitamin C Prevents Radiation Damage

Fukushima Radiation Release Worse than You Have Been Told, Large Doses of Vitamin C Important

Vitamin C Mops Up the Nuclear Age

The only search result for "Liposomal Ascorbic Acid" was this: http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,13208.msg354207.html#msg354207 . But that post and its replies veer away from the liposomal aspect into bioflavenoids and so on.
 

Renaissance

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I made my first batch of liposomal C last week and thought it was a useful thing to be able to make. I've seen some places that claim it absorbs into the body even better than IV vit C. The gist behind making it is that you mix lecithin with asorbic acid (not buffered or other types of C) and the lipid from the lecithin coats the vit C. This apparently allows the vitamin C to absorb into your tissues to a higher degree.

What is needed:

an ultrasonic cleaner (the same that is used to clean jewelry)
a blender
lecithin powder
asorbic acid powder
distilled or purified water

It seems people mostly use soy lecithin, but I found some egg yolk lecithin on swansonviitamins and used the full bottle. It comes in capsules so you have to open them up to get the powder out. One full bottle is just shy of 6 TB, so if you use the following measurements you'll want to get a couple bottles.

6 1/2 TB of lecithin in 2 cups of warm distilled water mix until dissolved
1 TB of vit C powder in 1 cup of warm distilled water mixed until dissolved
mixed both together in a blender (it foams up so let it sit for a little while)
pour mixture into ultrasonic cleaner and run for about 5 minutes

A video with the same basic instructions can be found here.

Using a blender alone will coat the vitamin C some, but an ultrasonic cleaner is needed if you want a high absorption rate. I bought a cheap one on amazon (around $25-$30), but you have to be careful when you're finished as it seems they can burn out pretty easily if liquid falls inside when it is being poured out. I used a small ladle to prevent this and cleaned it out with a paper towel.

My mother had a fairly nasty bug recently with a long lasting cough, and the liposomal C took it right away. I took some for a few days and could feel that it was quite a bit more powerful than just regular mega-dosing.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
Shane said:
I made my first batch of liposomal C last week and thought it was a useful thing to be able to make. <snip>

That's a great guide, thanks for sharing Shane! Do you know if the water has to be distilled? The reason I ask is that I don't have a distiller and don't really trust store-bought distilled water.
 

Renaissance

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Foxx said:
That's a great guide, thanks for sharing Shane! Do you know if the water has to be distilled? The reason I ask is that I don't have a distiller and don't really trust store-bought distilled water.

Hey Foxx, the ultrasonic cleaner just seems to agitate the mixture better than a blender, so no I don't think it has to be distilled; the water you trust to drink should be fine. I wouldn't use store bought distilled water either.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
Shane said:
Hey Foxx, the ultrasonic cleaner just seems to agitate the mixture better than a blender, so no I don't think it has to be distilled; the water you trust to drink should be fine. I wouldn't use store bought distilled water either.

Ok, thanks for clarifying!
 

Voyageur

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[quote author=Shane]
I made my first batch of liposomal C last week...

What is needed:

an ultrasonic cleaner (the same that is used to clean jewelry)
a blender
lecithin powder
asorbic acid powder
distilled or purified water

[...]

A video with the same basic instructions can be found here.

[...]

My mother had a fairly nasty bug recently with a long lasting cough, and the liposomal C took it right away. I took some for a few days and could feel that it was quite a bit more powerful than just regular mega-dosing.
[/quote]

Very interesting, missed this before. Sounds like the Ultrasonic aspect is critical? The video was a good added example, so thanks. :)
 

Nook

Dagobah Resident
Very interesting. Looking forward to making some liposomal C myself, the ultrasonic cleaner is probably the toughest item to get on the list.

Griffin, thanks for posting as I have not seen this article on SOTT before. Also, I feel obliged to mention Potassium Iodide as another effective supplement against radiation.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
It may be a little trickier to work with a liquidy kind of substance than a powder lecithin for making the liposomal vitamin C at home, but here's the only bulk lecithin that's not soy (it's Sunflower) that I've seen that it's not in pills:

_http://www.bluemountainorganics.com/by-type/superfoods/sunflower-lecthin

I haven't used it to make any liposomal vitamin C (yet--I might at a later time), but thought others might find it helpful.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Foxx said:
It may be a little trickier to work with a liquidy kind of substance than a powder lecithin for making the liposomal vitamin C at home, but here's the only bulk lecithin that's not soy (it's Sunflower) that I've seen that it's not in pills:

_http://www.bluemountainorganics.com/by-type/superfoods/sunflower-lecthin

I haven't used it to make any liposomal vitamin C (yet--I might at a later time), but thought others might find it helpful.

Good find Foxx - I wonder if it works as well in the Lipo C recipe. The Blue Mntn Org folks also make nut butters from raw/organic nuts that are properly soaked and dried.
 

nicklebleu

The Living Force
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There was an article in SOTT yesterday, in case some of you missed it:

http://www.sott.net/article/256313-Did-Liposomal-Vitamin-C-cure-cancer

Very interesting article! There are many links to ressources and DIY recipes. However they mention Sodium Ascorbate as opposed to Ascorbic Acid, which is a balanced version similar to the Calcium Ascorbate discussed in other threads on the forum. Wonder if Calcium Ascorbate can be processed into liposomal vitamin C as well as Sodium Ascorbate. Don't really see a reason why not - but then again, I am not a chemist. But I think that I will give it a shot when I am back home ...

I reckon that might be a good kit to have in case of severe infectious disease - as illustrated by the chap in New Zealand, who was dying in Intensive Care and where the relatives managed to force the hospital in trying out high-dose intravenous vitamin C (link in above article).

Once the nasty bugs are popping up ...
 

anka

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Did anyone record any side effect that could perhaps come from too much lecithin breaking the blood cholesterol? I guess that dealing with radiation exposure would be preferable even despite temporary low cholesterol level but what if you use it for another type of illness or if you are forced to be taking the solution for weeks or a few months in order to overcome the radiation effects?
 

Rabelais

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From several popular alt health sites I have recently read of the likelihood that most of the commercially available ascorbic acid is now sourced from GMO corn. There is a push to get vitamin C manufacturers to state on their label whether or not their ascorbic acid is GMO corn sourced. Does anyone with a background in chemistry know whether or not there is actually a difference in ascorbic acid derived from GMO corn glucose, or is it all the same after the process?

Tapioca is another source for ascorbic acid and there are commercially available GMO free vitamin Cs from manufacturers who use this source for that reason. But what I would like to know, perhaps a question for the Cs, is the corn sourced ascorbic acid detrimental... or in the extraction process of the ascorbic acid is the GMO factor mitigated from the final product?

I have yet to find any scientific evidence that ascorbic acid from GMO sources is any different than ascorbic acid from non-GMO corn. That does not mean that there isn't any, I simply have yet to find any scientific qualitative evidence of the difference. In the meantime my big jug of NOW ascorbic acid crystals is stowed at the back of a closet, pending further information. NOW C is one of the companies identified as selling GMO derived ascorbic acid and refusing to label it as such.

Until this question finds an answer, liposomal vitamin C making might be better experimented with using a tapioca sourced or a guaranteed GMO-free corn sourced ascorbic acid.
 

griffin

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Rabelais said:
Does anyone with a background in chemistry know whether or not there is actually a difference in ascorbic acid derived from GMO corn glucose, or is it all the same after the process?

The same question recently occurred to me, for the same reason. Since ascorbic acid (technically, L-ascorbic acid) is the molecule C6H8O6, containing just carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms, where the raw material is sourced seems irrelevant.

As long as ascorbic acid powder is pure white, indicating a high level of purity - as opposed to yellowish color indicating the presence of impurities - I'll take what I already have and not worry too much about the source. It's always good to avoid buying GMO anything, of course, but as a practical matter I won't on principle avoid taking ascorbic acid powder synthesized from GMO corn.

In other words, I'm not going to throw out the 5lbs of ascorbic acid powder that I recently bought and replace it with a non-GMO derived but chemically identical product just to send a message or make a politically correct but inconsequential statement. However, in the future I will look for the non-GMO derived ascorbic acid powder and buy that instead if I find it, and will even pay a little more for it, and I encourage others to do the same.
 
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