Is Systemic Supply Chain Breakdown Coming Very Soon as Stage 2 of the Great Reset?

cinnamon

Jedi
FOTCM Member
More from Florida - intermittent missing items in the grocery stores - but no problems getting what I need. What's more disturbing is the impact on alternative suppliers... My preferred rancher can't find dry ice to ship her beef! Publix has also jacked up meat prices to where I'm actually saving money by ordering from local grass fed operations.
 

Jones

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FOTCM Member
I work in a foodbank and we seem to be experiencing the opposite at the moment. We don't ordinarily have the range of a supermarket but we have had plentiful supplies apart from some of the more economical staples like bread, rice and pasta.

Our rate of new memberships have exploded off the back of supermarket shortages and so we've been running out of stock on hand faster and doing pick ups twice a day instead of once - the fact that we've been giving out a 10kg box of bacon with each food parcel might have a wee bit of influence!

Odd thing is that much of our stock is stock that supermarket's don't want any more for various reasons - close to best before dates, damaged packaging, end of line, over order that they don't want to/can't store or keep fresh etc. One reason could be that supermarket's over calculated consumer Christmas spending though there is one strange thing that seems to contradict that idea. We got loads of OTC painkillers just as supermarket shortages were being reported on MSM.

The current level of supply is probably temporary - we'll see what happens.
 

unkl brws

Jedi Master
Some weird "flip-flop" policy from the government in Canada today. First, it was this announcement (from SOTT.net)-
Canada drops vaccine mandate for its truckers after pressure from industry -- Sott.net

Now today, I see this -

From the C.T.A. article -
Recent media reports over the last 24 hours indicated the federal government had repealed the mandate for Canadian drivers; but officials have now clarified through notice that the “information shared yesterday was provided in error.”
 

psychegram

The Living Force
Some weird "flip-flop" policy from the government in Canada today. First, it was this announcement (from SOTT.net)-
Canada drops vaccine mandate for its truckers after pressure from industry -- Sott.net

Now today, I see this -

From the C.T.A. article -

Sounds to me like confusion in the bureaucracy. Probably one official retained enough sanity to repeal the regulation, which then got overruled by someone higher up the food chain.
 

Tuulikki

Jedi Master
I did my first shift this morning as a "personal shopper" - catchy title!! Basically shopping for the online orders in a very large supermarket. Totally out of my comfort zone as I have spent most of my life caring for people, but there you go. There were some items in short supply but on the whole we managed to find most of the things ordered with only a very small proportion having to be clicked as unavailable. I will monitor the situation in the coming weeks. Cat food still seems to have bare shelves but it is a very large supermarket so they always have many different varieties. My mogs may have to get used to something different from their usual.

Interestingly the job I actually applied for still has a week to run before applications close but I was hired very quickly. I think the staff shortages are biting. Night duty seems to be a problem all the time. I wanted to get "my feet under the table" so to speak before the unvaccinated carers and medical staff are "terminated" in April. There may be a bit of rush to obtain alternative employment then. We'll see.
 

BHelmet

The Living Force
Gotta remember that. Slow cooked pot roasts can be incredibly tasty. What oven temperature do you cook at @BHelmet and for how long?
Wow, I am honored you’d ask. But I wing it. I look up 3 different methods and then split the difference! I don’t have a science. I tend to cook low and slow and then put the broiler on for the last 5-10 minutes to crisp things up. The cool thing is that you can make it Mediterranean or French or Germanic or Middle Eastern just by changing the spices and a few ingredients. And I love the one-size-fits-all meal in a bucket that contains all your nutrients. Like at the very end I might throw in some Arugula to add a “salad“ component. Arugula is tough anyway and a few minutes in the warm juices adds a nice dimension.
 

Joe

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FOTCM Member
We here know that being prepared for this is an existentially serious issue. 2022 - and possibly early 2022 - looks as if this matter will become our number one day-to-day concern as the Pandemic morphs into the Supplydemic.

Seems fairly likely. The "pandemic" has created some problems, but only enough to weaken the global economy in different areas, not enough to provoke a full scale crisis. For that to happen, I think it's gonna need some good old fashioned imperial overreach combined with a helping hidden hand.

One possible candidate is the current Ukraine/US vs Russia situation that continues to simmer away. Some kind of provocation from one side or another (likely the US) might justify the US 'huuuuuge' sanctions on Russia and definitive canceling of Nord Stream 2.

That (and a response from the Bear) would send already high energy prices skyrocketing and have multiple knock-on effects across the board. Of course, all of it would be seen as a 'managed' crisis by the PTB - with the CIA thinking they can take Russia down a peg or two for a long time and others using it for more draconian population control - but other events waaaay beyond their control might intervene and make their little drill go a little too 'live' for even their liking.

So I'd say keep a close eye on Ukraine and Russia-US relations over the next few weeks, and also the 'emerging' threat of a major 'cyber attack on the supply chain', which the EU are planning to run a 6 week exercise on later this month.

EU to Stage Large-Scale Cyberattack Exercise on Supply Chains
 

Michael B-C

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
but other events waaaay beyond their control might intervene and make their little drill go a little too 'live' for even their liking.
Those waaaaay beyond their control might include a small, nothing-burger state in the middle-east with an over eager trigger finger and a penchant for hijacking (sic) and dancing all over others false flag operations?

Untitled.jpg

(faces whited out to ensure no nation-state identification - and anyway I see no dancing!)

Unless Joe you mean Don't Look Up!? Sorry, I mean 'Dont Look in Any Direction Unless We've Told you Where First...'
 

Benjamin

Jedi Master
Here in Alberta I haven't noticed many shortages of food. There was a blip when the BC floods cut the highway but recovered fairly quickly. I have noticed prices generally have increased pretty much across the board by ~10% with some exceptions but if you wait for a sale or price drop it's not too bad. Bacon has increased by about $4 for a 1kg pack ($16), and pork loin has increased about $10 last year. Beef is always expensive. I don't even bother looking unless it's a cheap cut roast. A pork lion will run around $35-$38 now, whereas a beef loin of similar size runs at $70-$80. Chicken breasts have gone up by about $5 dollars per club pack but again I wait for a price drop. I always look for the % off stickers. I'll buy several packs of whatever, individually re-pack and freeze. A weird shortage I noticed around Caesarmass was regular Cheerios. They were out for weeks. Don't know why. People making their own 'nuts an' bolts'? You could only buy sugar-coated cheer.

I don't know why but this thread actually triggered a memory from my genealogy work. From my dad's line in Mecklenburg, Germany I was always running into the job titles of 'Taglöhner' (day laborer) and 'Arbeitsmann' (workman) everywhere. But there was another title that I also ran into a lot which was 'Hauswirt'. The current translation of this is 'landlord' which made no sense to me during the 1600 -1800's. I found another person had posted the question on Ancestry forums asking what this was and the reply was someone/family who lived in a one room house no better then a shack and had a plot of land that they did not own. They grew vegetables on this land but not grains. They could eat the food but a certain amount was for the 'lord' of the land upon which they lived. I can't remember who said it, but I remember reading a quote that summed up the situation in Mecklenburg back then quite vividly which went something like, "Whatever happens in Mecklenburg has happened everywhere else 100 years before." It's funny and sad at the same time.
 
Thoughts from Northern California. I haven’t noticed bare shelves that give any indication that food shortages are upcoming. Maybe some low stock from time to time and prices a little higher on some items. Our area produces quite a bit food so there are a few local options or within the area, so not a lot of reliance on imported food.

I found this article to be a good summary for “the state of supply-chain” and provides some perspective on where we’ve been and where we may be headed going into 2022:

Supply chains in 2022: shortages will continue, but for some sellers the problem will be too much stock

There’s much to be said from my perspective as well having joined a logistic start up at the beginning of plandemic. I figured if I had to design for something that I could learn more about “who designs the world and why?” then a logistics platform would be a potential good place. And now spending nearly the last 2 years having a bird’s eye view of the ongoing reconfiguration of the supply-chain there’s much to speculate…

So, is the supply-chain just going to shut down? I don’t think so. I see shortages affecting areas regionally that rely heavily on imports and don’t export a range of goods with much tangible value.

There’s also the keyword of “visibility”
within the “opaque” world of supply-chain. Visibility refers to the digitalization of the supply-chain in order to provide two-way accountability. Sounds like good thing — even “multi-polar” if the ends are mutual, that is unless you’re an ideological possessed technocratic betting on visibility to provide “full spectrum dominance.” In that case…

If you’re a community, county, state, country and you do not comply with “green” or “zero emission” policies well, we can call a lockdown due to increased cases, choke-hold trade lanes and divert shipments quickly. This form of economic extortion by targeting specific regions while never maximizing profits through the perception of scarcity will likely continue as a strategy by the PTB.

And this is where I see the weaponization of food as very plausible and an easy way to get people to comply to the “Great Reset” - “control the food, control the people”.

Basically I see scarcity being manufactured with greater precision for these platforms targeting those areas that reject the great reset, but those areas with the most resiliency will have the best opportunity to redefine their communities and build something much better than what the technocratic pathocrats have envisioned - self-sustaining creative communities built on ingenuity and sweat of their own free will - the “Great Reject”.

Another aspect to highlight - the record profits from container or capacity crunch is indirectly a consequence of the lockdowns and the largest container companies seem to be creating their own bubble while funding they’re next investments from the current record profits - again green tech, zero emissions ships and other gadgetry. Here’s an article that speculates to some degree on the above:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/busi...2c4196-7446-11ec-a26d-1c21c16b1c93_story.html

So, while many container companies are buying large volumes of container boxes to meet demand once these containers flood the capacity market, demand will drop and the bubble bursts - why would they crash they’re own wave? “The future!” Mainly so they can continue to control the amount and price of cargo space available while their profit margins continue to increase.

This last quarter in 2021 I noticed quite a bit of consolidation. Major container lines such as Maersk are creating a closed end to end supply-chain where they can control all aspects of the business. Here’s an example:

https://www.themiddlemarket.com/new...warehouse-giant-lf-logistics-in-3-6b-takeover

Plus they’ve already funded or continuing to fund (such as Maersk just sold options to buy alt fuel container ships) that future through further manipulation of supply/demand conveniently using crisis capitalism - aka lockdowns because of XYZ variant. It’s pure greed and maniacal. It’s also no surprise that logistic index’s ended 2021 on record highs…

Major freight indexes hit new record-highs on the last day of the year - Container News

Maersk Exercises Options for Four More Methanol-Powered Containerships

Well, this post became quite long, but hope it’s helpful info (even if a bit rambley). But with a supply-chain in this much flux along side all the PTB hubris to control the outcomes, it seems Mother Nature is poised to throw a frozen wrench into their plans. 🥶
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Pour le moment en France sur la Côte d'Azur aucune pénurie dans les magasins d'alimentation mais cela pourrait venir...
J'entends juste parler de la Vitmine D qui pourrait ne plus être commercialisée...

For the moment in France on the French Riviera, there is no shortage in the food stores but it could come...
I just hear about Vitmine D which might not be marketed anymore...
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I was talking to a man that is working in a Chinese food store (he is not Chinese himself, that's why I am able to have a conversation with him. In a regular Chinese store, all the Chinese do not like communication and they almost no speak Spanish). So I told him that the prices are up since one week, he said that before, a container costed around 3-4 thousand euros, now it costs 14 thousand. And some products that are not in the store now, he does not know if they will be again on the shelves.

In another very good big store I saw that the pastry section is smaller, no more croissants and all this devil food.

The big problem also is not only concerning food. This situation is in a mechanic machine, everything is part of the mechanic and the machine. So: fewer workers in the stores, instead of 2 or 3, now one. Fewer people working in banks: instead of 3 now one. And it will grow day after day, week after week. The consequences are dramatic for everyone.
 

Mike

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
but other events waaaay beyond their control might intervene and make their little drill go a little too 'live' for even their liking.
I don't know if you had something natural in mind, because it doesn't read like that, but I thought of the big Tonga volcano eruption today in relation to this. People in some section of the Alt online world may even try to say that the eruption was man-made and a warning from this side or that in terms of war or even the part of the war starting.

But figure mother earth/universe might be saying, in a way, "you want to do what you have been doing and what you are planning... ok, children." The Tool song lyrics from the song Ænema come to mind "'Cause Mom's gonna fix it all soon. Mom's comin' 'round to put it back the way it ought to be." - help is on the way?
 
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