John Major Jenkins

I. Who is John Major Jenkins?

A. Some Background

Online Jenkins is touted as a "a leading expert in the mysteries of ancient Mesoamerican cosmology and calendars." _http://www.soundstrue.com/shop/authors/John_Major_Jenkins?authorId=219&showAuthorHeader=true&component=authorslist

Jenkins describes himself as a

an independent researcher who has devoted himself to reconstructing ancient Mayan cosmology and philosophy.
[...]

and as

a visiting scholar, [who] has taught classes at The Institute of Maya Studies in Miami, The Maya Calendar Congress in Mexico, The Esalen Institute, Naropa University and many other venues both nationally and abroad (_http://alignment2012.com/about_jmj.html),
...though he apparently completed only one semester of college as stated in this online article: "How John Major Jenkins, Jonathan Zap and Terence McKenna met during a Weekend of High Strangeness in 1996"_http://www.zaporacle.com/a-mutant-convergence-how-john-major-jenkins-jonathan-zap-and-terence-mckenna-met-during-a-weekend-of-high-strangeness-in-1996/

Terence [McKenna] asked me [JMJ] what kind of credentials I had. Trying to be clever, I said something like “Psilocybin U,” but Terence wasn’t moved (I completed one semester of college)."
You can read more about Jenkins on Wikipedia, however it should be noted that on July 19th, 2010, after being contacted by parties whom Wikipedia has declined to identify, Jenkins' biography on Wikipedia.org _https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Major_Jenkins was "scrubbed clean" of any information concerning his psychedelic drug use and advocacy. _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:John_Major_Jenkins#Hallucinogens


B. Drug Use and Advocacy

As stated in his book, "The 2012 Story: The Myths, Fallacies, and Truth Behind the Most Intriguing Date in History", Jenkins started experimenting with psychedelic drugs by the age of nineteen.

At age nineteen I was inspired by the intrepid adventures of [Dolphin scientist John] Lilly, which I had read about in his books The Center of the Cyclone and The Deep Self. At the time I was very into yoga, meditation, fasting, and breath work. It was an extreme phase of purification, identity exploration, and engaging transformative inner work. Being resourceful, I sought out a facility in Chicago called Spacetime Tanks that advertised its “relaxation” services and “state-of-the-art” isolation tanks. After four or five trial experiences without pharmacological help, I had become comfortable with the process and made friends with one of the clerks there, and decided to propose my experiment. I had logged some experience with sacred plants, although I had lately eliminated mind-altering substances in deference to yoga practice, seeking clarity of mind. Nevertheless, I believed in the transformative power of these substances and decided to experience what Lilly was talking about—they weren’t called “consciousness-expanding” for nothing. I would be combining my ability to go into a meditative state, which I had developed as a result of daily meditation practice, with the isolation tank and a good dose of quality LSD.

[...]

The experience deeply affected me. It was completely different from the several psychedelic trips I had previously undertaken.

[...]

I sat in a park, drank water, and ate an apple I had brought with me, which was truly nectar. My senses came alive and my body lapped up its juicy flesh. Wow. I wrote what I could recall in my notebook, and by that evening I was none the worse for wear. My notebook concludes with an odd pronouncement, a kind of philosophical muse that echoes some key ideas from The Popol Vuh. At age twenty in 1984, however, I had no knowledge of The Popol Vuh...
Based on the preceding and the statements to follow, one has to ask to what extent did psychedelics influence the writing of Jenkins' book, "Maya Cosmogenesis 2012"?:

It was early May of 1996 [...] I had access to supplies of freshly grown psilocybecubensis mushrooms. I had ingested them fresh on two occasions in the previous two years. And more recently, I had done a dose that exceeded by far anything else I’d ever experienced. Since age 18 I had always approached drug use — even marijuana smoking — as opportunities for exploring consciousness.

Most of the essays I compiled into Maya Cosmogenesis 2012 were written between early 1995 and late 1996. (_http://www.zaporacle.com/a-mutant-convergence-how-john-major-jenkins-jonathan-zap-and-terence-mckenna-met-during-a-weekend-of-high-strangeness-in-1996/)
Though Jenkins has stated that he does not advocate the use of psychedelics, he has appeared in videos that support their use (JMJ appears at 5:16). _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-IYBIi6kNk&feature=channel&list=UL

Also, looking into Jenkins background, and because Jenkins and Terrence McKenna were friends, I am reminded of Jan Irvin's latest article, "How Darwin, Huxley, and the Esalen Institute launched the 2012 and psychedelic revolutions..." and his statement about McKenna being a "willful idiot".

Right now we can’t prove that McKenna was an [COINTELPRO] agent, but he was most certainly, at least, a willful idiot.
_http://www.gnosticmedia.com/how-darwin-huxley-and-the-esalen-institute-launched-the-2012-and-psychedelic-revolutions-and-began-one-of-the-largest-mind-control-operations-in-history/

I am currently working on gathering more info concerning JMJ. Will post more as I gather more.
 
John Major Jenkins is also connected with Jay Weidner. He and Weidner appear together in the documentary, "Timewave 2013" _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVXp4fIbC4c

Weidner also interviewed Jenkins on his "Smoke and Mirrors" radio show. _http://www.sacredmysteries.com/public/department68.cfm
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
Some of John Major Jenkins' Detractors are Energy Vampires Who'd Deny Us Our Multidimensional Birthright. http://www.2012hoax.org/energy-vampires
I guess that would be me :scared: since Jenkins poo-pooed my article wherein I remark a good deal to discredit his assertions. http://www.sott.net/article/251816-The-2012-Collective-Shift-the-Secret-History-of-End-Times-Prophecies

From the same source listed above:

Many of us will be surprised to hear this, since Jenkins is promoted as an erudite, scholarly “moderate” in the 2012 movement. However, his own words indicate that he’s actually on its fringe. Much of what follows is from the website of Jenkins’ close friend, Jonathan Zap, and especially the 2009 article they co-authored: “A Mutant Convergence—- How John Major Jenkins, Jonathan Zap and Terence McKenna met during a Weekend of High Strangeness in 1996”. [1]
Jenkins, Zap and McKenna

Early in that article, Jenkins describes his admiration for Terence McKenna, and the key role Jenkins’ own drug use played in the writing of his “magnum opus”, Maya Cosmogenesis 2012 (MC 2012). Of Jonathan Zap, Jenkins says, “His assessments of my own difficulties and dilemmas with other 2012 authors have always been psychologically astute and on target.”

What are those assessments? Among them, that his detractors (e.g., Stephen Tonkin)1 have a “brittle, neurotic power complex”, and egos that are “playing a masturbatory game” with themselves. [3][4]

As an even more bizarre example of Jenkins’ confidence in Zap’s infallible diagnoses, I’m in possession of a private communication2 in which Jenkins accuses a detractor of being an “energy vampire”, and refers him to Zap’s website for a “diagnosis” of that condition[8].
Surely we cannot confirm all of the above, and I am interested in FACTS. But it's interesting nonetheless. More to come.
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
One of Jenkins emails to me proclaims several complaints, one of which being with regard to my "brashly asserted" statement: "there is no conclusive evidence that the Maya realized the axial precession." He accounts for this with the following:

"Such an assertion is disproven by the work of Grofe (Archaeoastronomy Journal, Volume 24 and in the Cambridge IAU Vol. 278), and the work on the 3-11 Pik formula by veteran Maya scholar/epigrapher Barbara MacLeod (presented at the Maya Meetings in Austin), and such an assertion is also mitigated by the material I've cited in my 1998 book Maya Cosmogenesis 2012, involving scholars such as Gordon Brotherston, Marion Popenoe Hatch, and Eva Hunt. Not to mention my own work on the Long Count, Tortuguero Monument 6, La Corona Block V, and the archaeoastornomy and iconography at Izapa as presented at the Institute of Maya Studies and the First Izapa Round Table conference."
First of all, nothing has been "disproven" only speculated, and Michael Grofe's and Barbara MacLeod's source for their commentary on the topic [appears to be] Jenkins – no surprise there, and a bit too circular to be called "corroboration". Secondly, Jenkins' book Maya Cosmogenesis 2012, was published in 1998. This is significant in context to the statement in question because I was citing the 2006 work of Archaeologist James Aimers and Anthropologist Prudence Rice. {Astronomy, ritual and the interpretation of Maya E-Group architectural assemblages, Ancient Mesoamerica 17 (1):79 - 96, Aimers and Rice, 2006} Aimers and Rice had noted that there is no evidence - archaeological or historical - that the Maya placed any significance on solstices or equinoxes and thusly their awareness of a much more complex concept of a 26,000 year axial precession is dubious at best. Like I said earlier, Edmonson drew the conclusion that because the calendar (if indeed it ends 12/21/2012) ends on a solstice, this implies that the Maya may have been aware of the the tropical year, but certainly is not hard evidence of their knowledge of the axial precession.

Furthermore, Jenkins neglects to acknowledge the context of my actual statement:
"That said, there is no conclusive evidence that the Maya realized the axial precession, though we cannot rule it out either."
It seems cherry-picking is something of a praxis for Jenkins.

Most importantly, if anyone can help to further evidence my reasonable suspicion that:
Michael Grofe's and Barbara MacLeod's source for their commentary on the topic [appears to be] Jenkins
that would be very helpful. :)
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
Sorry, my statement:
Like I said earlier, Edmonson drew the conclusion that because the calendar (if indeed it ends 12/21/2012) ends on a solstice, this implies that the Maya may have been aware of the the tropical year, but certainly is not hard evidence of their knowledge of the axial precession.
isn't going to make sense because it isn't presented here :-[ And I'd edit it but I'm just a "disturbance in the force" ;)

That text was copied from the article I am putting together. For context:

Jenkins was affronted by the notion that I linked his work so concisely to Munro Edmonson's work. Jenkins went so far as to insist that I was implying that he plagiarized Edmonson. Nothing of the like was the case, as evidenced in the statement as it is written:

"…the Maya somehow managed to note when this alignment would take place — as per a theory first proposed by anthropologist, Munro Edmonson, in 1988, and furthered by independent researcher, John Major Jenkins, who claimed that the Maya were aware of where the ecliptic intersected the Great Rift (a band of dark dust clouds in the Milky Way), and gave this position in the sky a special significance in their cosmology. {Jenkins, What is the Galactic Alignment?}"
Jenkins initial argument to this, prior to accusing me of alluding to plagiarism was:
"Munro Edmonson noted, in his 1988 book, that the period ending in 2012 falls on a solstice. This suggested to him a possible intentional placement, in which the ancient Maya would have had to have had an accurate knowledge of the tropical year period (365.2422 days). That's all. I cited Edmonson in my 1992 book called Tzolkin."
I feel like this is some pretty wiggly semantics on Jenkins' part. He is not necessarily proving me wrong in what I have stated, but rather he is simply preferring to take complete credit – it seems. Which is fine by me, and only further asserts my points that this whole 12/21/2012 jazz began with Jenkins. If he wants to insist that it was ALL HIM and HIS BRILLIANT "UNPRECEDENTED" DISCOVERY, then fine. Let him own it!

Edmonson's book "The Book of the Year: Middle American Calendrical Systems" (1988) – which Jenkins is citing in his comment, and which I had referenced to corroborate my statement – DOES put forth a theory which alleged that the Maya based their calendar on certain astronomical observations. Perhaps I didn't word the sentence as Jenkins would have – highlighting Jenkins' achievements – but the statement is not untrue. I was not actually stating that Edmonson came up with the whole "galactic alignment" idea, I was only illustrating the trail from Edmonson's work to Jenkins' – that Edmonson had a theory linking the Mayan calander to 2012, and that Jenkins apparently made good use of that theory. As the article is an editorial essay on a much larger spectrum surrounding the "2012 phenomenon", and NOT an academic thesis on the specifics surrounding Jenkins' OR Edmonson's work, I felt no need to burden the reader with every single detail. It is a rather long article, after all.

The rest of my statement is very accurate per the link to Jenkins' own work, which I provided in the essay under the statement. Where it could be cause for trouble – in the pettiest way possible – is to suggest that Jenkins' work "followed" Edmonson's – though in chronology it had. The statement in no way specifically suggests or even implies plagiarism or that Jenkins based all of his work on Edmonson's observations. I merely indicated a fact that Edmonson was the first to link any significance to the Mayan calendar and 2012. Jenkins' complaint that I am accusing him of plagiarism seems a gross overstatement to say the least, and idle threat at worst. This type of MO is right out of the COINTELPRO handbook, incidentally: ignore what is actually said and redirect to some overblown and fallacious declaration in an effort to discredit the source. And before I am accused of making baseless assertions myself, allow me to confirm that I am only stating an interesting observation – not a fact that Jenkins is COINTELPRO.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
GregoryJ said:
I feel like this is some pretty wiggly semantics on Jenkins' part. He is not necessarily proving me wrong in what I have stated, but rather he is simply preferring to take complete credit – it seems. Which is fine by me, and only further asserts my points that this whole 12/21/2012 jazz began with Jenkins. If he wants to insist that it was ALL HIM and HIS BRILLIANT "UNPRECEDENTED" DISCOVERY, then fine. Let him own it!

Edmonson's book "The Book of the Year: Middle American Calendrical Systems" (1988) – which Jenkins is citing in his comment, and which I had referenced to corroborate my statement – DOES put forth a theory which alleged that the Maya based their calendar on certain astronomical observations. Perhaps I didn't word the sentence as Jenkins would have – highlighting Jenkins' achievements – but the statement is not untrue. I was not actually stating that Edmonson came up with the whole "galactic alignment" idea, I was only illustrating the trail from Edmonson's work to Jenkins' – that Edmonson had a theory linking the Mayan calander to 2012, and that Jenkins apparently made good use of that theory. As the article is an editorial essay on a much larger spectrum surrounding the "2012 phenomenon", and NOT an academic thesis on the specifics surrounding Jenkins' OR Edmonson's work, I felt no need to burden the reader with every single detail. It is a rather long article, after all.
I agree. Jenkins' response here is what I expect is a very good example of a covert aggressive (see In Sheep's Clothing) behavior and torched along by a perceived slight to his "academic credentials". I'm not trying to diagnose - but just sayin ...

GregoryJ said:
The rest of my statement is very accurate per the link to Jenkins' own work, which I provided in the essay under the statement. Where it could be cause for trouble – in the pettiest way possible – is to suggest that Jenkins' work "followed" Edmonson's – though in chronology it had. The statement in no way specifically suggests or even implies plagiarism or that Jenkins based all of his work on Edmonson's observations. I merely indicated a fact that Edmonson was the first to link any significance to the Mayan calendar and 2012. Jenkins' complaint that I am accusing him of plagiarism seems a gross overstatement to say the least, and idle threat at worst. This type of MO is right out of the COINTELPRO handbook, incidentally: ignore what is actually said and redirect to some overblown and fallacious declaration in an effort to discredit the source. And before I am accused of making baseless assertions myself, allow me to confirm that I am only stating an interesting observation – not a fact that Jenkins is COINTELPRO.
I found it interesting that he had no comment on COINTELPRO either on his part or in the field in general. Also no comment along the lines of the bigger picture in the article.

Anyway, thanks for the article Gregory! :)

Edit: fixed quotes
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
I found it interesting that he had no comment on COINTELPRO either on his part or in the field in general. Also no comment along the lines of the bigger picture in the article.
Yes, he really did miss the picture and only focussed on defending himself. He didn't even note that I actually agreed with some of his proclamations, in general, and I readily support the notion of a coming shift – affecting us collectively – likely of "biblical"/cosmic proportions. The difference being that I clearly state that no one can know for sure either way, which I know he tenuously alludes to as well, albeit with far less fortitudinous.

This begs the questions: why get so bent out of shape? why attack concepts presented that have nothing to do with him but totally ignore the most potent accusations? Why not just say, hey, I could help you make your claims more accurate according to my research? That could have quelled the COINTELPRO assertions. Something smells rotten in Denmark, and I aim to find out what.
 

Mariama

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
FWIW, this is what Moira Timms wrote about him in 'Forbidden History', chapter 16 'Destination Galactic Center' John Major Jenkins Thinks Today's World Has Much To Learn From The Ancient Maya.

No mention of college or university or psychedelic drugs for that matter.

[quote='Forbidden History', p. 126,127]
By high school, Jenkins says, he had exhausted science as an avenue of self-knowledge and began reading philosophy. "And that,", he says, "led to Eastern mysticism. This opened up a Gnostic path for me, a path of inner knowing, and I began to practice Yoga and meditation, I studied Tibetan mysticism, practiced celibacy, and wrote devotional poetry. I was trying to grow spiritually and free myself from the suburban nightmare of materialism that surrounded me."
By the time Jenkins reached twenty, that which was building within him was difficult to contain. "An inner spiritual crisis was welling up inside me, and I embarked on a pilgrimage that took me around the southeast United States. My mobile hermitage was a 1969 Doge van that I lived in for seven months. As my pilgrimage reached a crescendo, I meditated, chanted, and fasted, in locations along the Gulf Coast or in Forest Service campgrounds in the Florida panhandle." Jenkins wrote of this period in his 1991 book, Mirror in the Sky. "This is the first time I have publicly shared this aspect of my past," he says.
The pilgrimage spontaneously culminated in a three-day vigil, crying for a vision, chanting, and praying. It was a crisis of connection with a higher guiding force that I yearned to serve. In the early predawn hours on the cusp of Pisces, I had a mystical vision of the boon-bestowing goddess Govinda, who I also call the Earth Guardian." Jenkins says that the experience was attended by what is called, in Yoga, a kundalini rising. "It wasn't 'just' a dream or vision, as it was attended by an actual physical process called 'a turnabout in the deepest seat of the being' or 'the backward flowing method' described in the Taoist book The Secret of the Golden Flower."
Jenkins believes this experience with the goddess was the "boon" that bestowed upon him his mission, that led him to the Maya, a path that he now pursues in service to the Great Mother and the perennial wisdom. "It opened up a path of knowledge for me," he says. "Less than a week after that vision I met the person who encouraged me to travel to Mexico and visit the Maya."
Around that time Jenkins also read (the now classic) Mexico Mystique, by Frank Waters.
Today, almost twenty years later, Jenkins says that the connection with that original guiding force "continues to actively work within me, so I can continue to be a mouthpiece for the perennial philosophy. But balancing that call with the demands of making a living and paying the bills has, at times, been daunting."
[/quote]

Crying for a vision??
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
GregoryJ said:
I found it interesting that he had no comment on COINTELPRO either on his part or in the field in general. Also no comment along the lines of the bigger picture in the article.
Yes, he really did miss the picture and only focussed on defending himself. He didn't even note that I actually agreed with some of his proclamations, in general, and I readily support the notion of a coming shift – affecting us collectively – likely of "biblical"/cosmic proportions. The difference being that I clearly state that no one can know for sure either way, which I know he tenuously alludes to as well, albeit with far less fortitudinous.

This begs the questions: why get so bent out of shape? why attack concepts presented that have nothing to do with him but totally ignore the most potent accusations? Why not just say, hey, I could help you make your claims more accurate according to my research? That could have quelled the COINTELPRO assertions. Something smells rotten in Denmark, and I aim to find out what.
A covert-aggressive nature at core would go a long ways towards explaining that. But determining that with certainty might require a goodly amount of personal contact.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Mariama said:
Crying for a vision??
This is actually a long-standing tradition of numerous indigenous Amazonian tribes where at the appropriate time, the young male isolates himself in the jungle until the vision quest is complete. It usually involves some pretty serious suffering along the way. There is a great desire to achieve the vision and return to the tribe.
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
A covert-aggressive nature at core would go a long ways towards explaining that. But determining that with certainty might require a goodly amount of personal contact.
Very true. So far, I have only had "virtual contact" though I have pointedly noted a rather steep progression of aggression in the content. I have some other observations with this regard as well, but I'll keep them to myself for now. My interest in Jenkins is not character assassination – everybody has issues, and many of us are just doing the best we know how. If we are to be truly loving, we must remember this.

My interest is in the facts and fallacies of his assertions.

Mod's note; Edited to replace no by know as said by the author in his other post.
 

GregoryJ

Padawan Learner
Crying for a vision??

This is actually a long-standing tradition of numerous indigenous Amazonian tribes where at the appropriate time, the young male isolates himself in the jungle until the vision quest is complete. It usually involves some pretty serious suffering along the way. There is a great desire to achieve the vision and return to the tribe.
Yes, I've put myself through that on more than a couple occasions – once in the Amazon Jungle. I can tell you that 3 days is a meaningless token and little more – tourism.
The pilgrimage spontaneously culminated in a three-day vigil, crying for a vision, chanting, and praying.
Come and talk to me about it after some months in and I'll be impressed by your:
crisis of connection with a higher guiding force that I yearned to serve.
This is all New-Age-type, quick-fix-"esoterica" – spiritual tourism – that people these days think they can get away with "doing" and then pat them self on the back for it. I don't know which is more strange, the fact that he can say things like this and expect admiration and credibility or that he actually gets it.

And of this I can assure you – with very good reason for doing so – Jenkins hasn't a clue what The Secret of the Golden Flower is about. Almost nobody does, not Thomas Cleary either! Nothing short of a minimum of a decade of training in esoteric Taoism, under qualified guidance, and ancient Chinese language, will clarify an baseline understanding of that text.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
GregoryJ said:
*KNOW* how... damn this not being able to edit! :P
You should have been participating more earlier... the editing ability comes with number of posts... :cool2:
 
GregoryJ said:
Most importantly, if anyone can help to further evidence my reasonable suspicion that:
Michael Grofe's and Barbara MacLeod's source for their commentary on the topic [appears to be] Jenkins
that would be very helpful. :)
From _http://www.the2012post.com/2012/05/2012-the-beginning-part-two.html

Michael Grofe, a more traditional Maya scholar and an adjunct professor of anthropology at nearby American River College, discusses the divide between those scholars who are willing to entertain the possibility that the Maya were genuinely interested in the 2012 end date and those who "dismiss the entire thing." He notes that the latter group is probably turned off by its association with the apocalyptic, end-of-the-world slant and/or with New Age ideas such as the "rebirth of consciousness".

He judiciously places himself somewhere in the middle, thus signaling that he at least has an open mind on the subject."
Jenkins states this about his meeting with Grofe here: _http://www.mayaexploration.org/pdf/MEC_Facebook_Discussion_2010_Jenkins.pdf

[...] Maya scholar Michael Grofe explored such parallels in the Dresden Codex in his 2007 PhD dissertation. [See: _http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1407490561&Fmt=2&VType=PQD&VInst=PROD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1201138293&clientId=79356&cfc=1]

Immediately after meeting Michael at the Tulane ―2012‖ conference in February 2009 (we had already been in email communication for almost a year), we discussed investigating the 13 dates in Tortuguero Monument 6, looking for solar like-in-kind parallels to the 2012 date. Michael immediately found several important items (Michael‘s letter of February 22). The implications of these findings were immediately obvious, and very exciting. I was working hard on my book The 2012 Story. In late March I gave a presentation in Dallas, and shared some of these findings on Tortuguero. By May my book was done and I had incorporated, with Michael‘s permission, his key findings and other items of relevance to understanding how 2012 was thought about at Tortuguero [...].
Also see: "THE NAME OF GOD L: B’OLON YOKTE’ K’UH?" by Michael J. Grofe_http://www.wayeb.org/notes/wayeb_notes0030.pdf

Also from _http://www.the2012post.com/2012/05/2012-the-beginning-part-two.html

Barbara MacLeod is an independent anthropologist specializing in the Mayan language and she, too, talked about the split between the "New Agers" and the traditional scholars, noting that "rocks are being thrown on both sides," a schism that she would like to see healed.

Evidently she has made the most comprehensive available decipherment of Tortuguero Monument 6, having first started working on it in the 1970's, so she speaks with some authority when she postulates the notion that there is indeed a paradigm shift currently going on.
Also see: "WHAT COULD HAPPEN IN 2012: A RE-ANALYSIS OF THE 13-BAK’TUNPROPHECY ON TORTUGUERO MONUMENT 6" by Sven Gronemeyer and Barbara MacLeod _http://www.wayeb.org/notes/wayeb_notes0034.pdf

Apparently from this PDF _http://thecenterfor2012studies.com/2012center-note4.pdf there was some discrepancy between Jenkins and Macleod as to who discovered and published what first, which seems to be an ongoing theme in Jenkins' world. Jenkins starts his essay with:

This essay was written several months before Gronemeyer & MacLeod’s Wayeb Note 34 was released in August 2010.
Based on the links above, I am not so sure that Grofe's and MacLeod's sole source on the the Mayan/2012 topic is Jenkins as they seem to be researchers in their own right before and after meeting Jenkins. However it may be that Jenkins has persuaded them both into his "camp" in partial if not full support of his Galactic Alignment theory, OSIT.
 
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