Lionel Debates the World's Most Politically Correct "Comedian" Who Proves How We Have Lost Our Minds

SlipNet

Jedi Master
Lionel is on good form here, gave me a chuckle anyway. Offence Culture has gotten way out of hand; when I were a lad (ee by gum) we took the pistachio out of each other mercilessly, it was part of life, we called it "having a craic". No one cried, and mostly we'd laugh our asses off. It's absolutely bewildering to see that comedians now find it normal to sign agreements that they're not going to cause offence.

By that token, absolutely all of my favourite comedians would be persona non gratae; bye bye George Carlin, Lenny Bruce, Sam Kinison, Bill Hicks. All too filthy for generation snowflake.

I'm actually offended by people who are always offended. They offend my sense of intellectual rigour, that they can't see where this kind of madness leads.

 

anothermagyar

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I like Lionel. He used to be on radio. Until he asked a question or 2 about 9/11.
Nothing zany just what happened to the plain in Pennsylvania, what happened to building 7.
Just what good observers and logical people would ask.
He was fired.
 

Ysus

Jedi
FOTCM Member
Kate kept her cool and some of her arguments may have validity (e.g. venue having the right to formulate their rules as they deem fit) but it seems she cannot or does not want to see the importance of context and seems to be prone to conflation.

In direct context we are dealing with real life people and it makes sense to be careful about what we say to the next person, whereas a comedy show is a stage, a performance with an accepted distance. So her talking about, and comparing, free speech in coffee shops with free speech in a comedy performance doesn’t really compare meaningfully.

As far as I can see: when we go to see a comedian in a show we do not meet a personal, private, direct person. The comedian puts on his/her comedian cloak and may in that role have a bit of a license, perhaps even a duty, to offend.

The audience expects (up to very recently, anyway) and appreciates all things comedy: overstatement, understatement, caricaturing, exaggeration, comparing incomparables, pushing boundaries etc. He/she has a role. She/he is the jester, the rattler, the cheek, the verbal dare-devil, the safety valve on the pressure cooker of society, offering welcome catharses to his/her audience in a humourous, civil enough, safe enough space.

What I found interesting: while Kate is apparently quite happy with censored, sanitised comedy, she does not seem to mind making rather personal, sniding, condescending remarks:

E.g. when she tells Lionel to use a dictionary to find out what the word “racist” means, suggesting he cannot read a dictionary or when she congratulates him on his long career, adding she’s never heard of him.

He, on the other hand, is as far as I can tell just exasperated and disheartened. He expresses himself in a mix of incredulity and dispair.

Not much of what he says is either heard or respected and even willfully distorted. And while he is pretty pissed off he does not set out to personally attack Kate, but rather tries to reach out to her as a mate of the trade, begging her to see what she is signing up for and that by so doing risking to be an accomplice in killing good and meaningful comedy.

It seems to me he sees further down the road, too. Some censorship may or may not be reasonable but where does it end? And who decides? And who needs protection from whom? Again this conflation: her example with children’s shows. Obviously children have to be protected (that goes without saying) but, as he says, over 18 year olds, too?
 

SlipNet

Jedi Master
I feel glad that I grew up in the late 70's/early 80's, life just seemed more robust then. Looking back it feels like a different world. In many respects I feel for the current crop of youngsters, they've got a whole minefield of technocratic paramoralistic BS to wade through, and as ever with these types of things you have to wonder just what exactly is being protected.

Some censorship may or may not be reasonable but where does it end? And who decides? And who needs protection from whom? Again this conflation: her example with children’s shows. Obviously children have to be protected (that goes without saying) but, as he says, over 18 year olds, too?
Exactly! Consider the work of Bill Hicks as an example. There'd be protesters and boycotters outside his venues if he was alive today. He offended everyone, and no-one bar Carlin has made me laugh more. Plus there was always the intellectual edge, daring you to think outside of programmed responses to consider the bigger picture.

I think this comedian Kate reminds me of what Roger Waters said about musicians today; that they're so happy to have a career that they'll dare not rock the boat. That's why most modern music is focused on emotions, passions, subjective impressions. They haven't got the cojones to explore any further.
 
That was a painful watch. She sounded like a politician with her attempt to monopolise the narrative with her tiresome monologue with no apparent need to pause to take a breath or allow the listener time to consider anything she said. It was an assault on the senses and felt like trying to be brainwashed. Her approach suggested to me that she was so convinced of her own rightness of thought that she had no desire to listen to any other perspective or even allow it to be heard. Her repeated interruption of him after he had patiently listened to her without interrupting her was telling too. The lag in the audio feed did not help and the host was so passive they completely failed to control and direct the 'debate'. However, it was worth watching it just to watch his expressions during her interminable opening monologue and also to see the look on her face as he responded with a request for brevity. Oh, she was not happy about that! She may have superficially kept her cool but it was clear to me that she was irritated and could not stop herself from trying to interrupt him and shut him down. This is a subject which could inspire an interesting conversation but this was rather a missed opportunity I am afraid.
 

SlipNet

Jedi Master
I do not get how she is comedian. I mean who finds her funny?
She probably plays it very safe in her routines. I've got to be honest I've never heard of her prior to finding this news story.

As someone who writes, draws and paints (along with keyboard studying), I would never submit myself to censorship. But along with that, I know full well that in my work I'd never descend to cheap sensationalism which could also trigger those who are easily offended, even though those people irritate me considerably. Caesar was right; people really are lost. No doubt the future will hold plenty of shocks which will shake many out of their complacency. There has to be freedom of speech/self expression, As Jordan Peterson has correctly observed, this is how most of us learn how to think.
 

SlipNet

Jedi Master
I think Lobaczewski defined this as the hysteroidal cycle. We're living in it once again. It's a combination of mania and virtue signalling, and it comes across as desperate stuff to me. I can't help but suspect that many people are here to learn some very tough lessons which may prove to serve them well in the long term, but it'll drive them nuts in the short term.
 

SlipNet

Jedi Master
Great quotable line! I may use it on Twitter!
Go for it! I'm more than happy to be quoted. This situation has to be confronted, with reason. It's a funny thing; I began to notice back in the early 00's that I could no longer converse well with many younger people. I put it down to the old generation gap, but recent developments have led me to think that strange educational policies are largely to blame.

Because I'm part of an art studio, I meet people regularly between the ages of 14-80. It's frequently amazing to hear what people have got to say, and not always for good reasons!
 
When I said earlier that she sounded like a politician [or a saleswoman using marketing techniques to push her product] I meant to also say that he sounded like a normal, everyday person. I was just saying to a friend the other day how happy I am to live where I live because it might be an economically deprived little town with plenty of social care issues but it is so refreshingly down to earth with no pretensions. I can talk to a neighbour or a shop cashier with little chance of the bs of political correctness coming into it. It is my little refuge from all the insanity I see on the internet. I hate to think what it would be like if everyone became like the politically correct, 'right thinking' brigade. I think I would feel like I was suffocating. I wonder if that is what it feels like to live in a totalitarian regime.

Go for it! I'm more than happy to be quoted. This situation has to be confronted, with reason. It's a funny thing; I began to notice back in the early 00's that I could no longer converse well with many younger people. I put it down to the old generation gap, but recent developments have led me to think that strange educational policies are largely to blame.

Because I'm part of an art studio, I meet people regularly between the ages of 14-80. It's frequently amazing to hear what people have got to say, and not always for good reasons!
Indeed; it can be rather disconcerting. I have been part of a video game community online for quite a few years now and it has been illuminating to see how that has changed over the years. When I first joined there was a small minority of social justice types but now it is the vast majority. I pretty much keep my head down and do not engage with them unless it is on very safe topics but it is very interesting to see their perspective and mindset on various topics. I could happily leave now as my interest in video games has waned so much it would not trouble me to leave but it exposes me to topics and a way of thinking that I would not willingly seek which I find helpful. It would be very easy to just keep to sites like this where I am in sympathy with the prevailing norms. However, so many of them there are so blinkered in their thinking and outlook and I do not want to fall into that trap of sanctimony if I can help it. It is a bit like 'Keep your friends close and your enemies closer'. Not that I consider them enemies but you know.
 

SlipNet

Jedi Master
When I said earlier that she sounded like a politician [or a saleswoman using marketing techniques to push her product] I meant to also say that he sounded like a normal, everyday person. I was just saying to a friend the other day how happy I am to live where I live because it might be an economically deprived little town with plenty of social care issues but it is so refreshingly down to earth with no pretensions. I can talk to a neighbour or a shop cashier with little chance of the bs of political correctness coming into it. It is my little refuge from all the insanity I see on the internet. I hate to think what it would be like if everyone became like the politically correct, 'right thinking' brigade. I think I would feel like I was suffocating. I wonder if that is what it feels like to live in a totalitarian regime.
I live in a small town, and I'd whilst I'd not like to presume the minds of others I find the place to be pretty chilled. Funnily though, I recently found, as I walked to my old mate's house, a bloke ranting about the globalists, quoting Alex Jones. I live in hope that he'll emerge beyond that limited hangout, which is what infowars is. Jones is owned by Zionists, and he's been made to look like a poor actor in recent times. Even Joe Rogan has turned away from him.
 

goyacobol

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
SlipNet,

Thanks for posting the interview. Lionel is one of my favorite RT commentators/comedians (also I think he is similar to George Carlin).

He says so much that rings true with a sense of humor.

I think the Cs have a great sense of humor too.

Here is one session where they show that this is not just all work and no play:

18 February 1995:
Q: (T) Well, you were going to give us some important information here... that is what you said in the beginning of this session...

A: All in due time, but first, we want to have some fun.

Q: (L) Well, go ahead. I want to see this happen, do it.

A: Lighten up, Laura. This is your other persona talking directly to myself!
Thanks, for helping us to Lighten up and learn at the same "time". :-P
 
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Renaissance

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
The PC 'comedian' came off totally smug and morally superior. She demonstrated quite well how the authoritarian PC culture 'thinks', which seems rooted in the desire for control/dominance and the 'compassionate' shtick is just an effective means of getting there. Notice her evasive responses when Lionel repeatedly points out the necessity of context. There seems to be this fundamental denial of context/reality, which is really something to see. I think people like this actually do, on some level, understand that context exists, but it is something to be overcome and stamped out. Their ideological dream is so deeply rooted in control that it dominates everything from any potentially positive drives within and is expressed outwardly in the need to dominate others. We all do this in various forms, but the high degree we see it in the PC crowd provides an amplified example of this destructive side of nature. The C's seem to be describing this in their 'Life is religion' quote:

'Life is religion. Life experiences reflect how one interacts with God. Those who are asleep are those of little faith in terms of their interaction with the creation. Some people think that the world exists for them to overcome or ignore or shut out. For those individuals, the worlds will cease. They will become exactly what they give to life. They will become merely a dream in the 'past.' People who pay strict attention to objective reality right and left, become the reality of the 'Future.'
It's also interesting that those caught in the dream are also those who have 'little faith in terms of their interaction with the creation'. Post modern materialism casts aside the possibility of any type of spiritual interaction. Instead, everything is malleable and to be shaped in the form of what they think things should be. And when you go deep down this road, as the PC crowd has, this 'thinking' doesn't even need to be based on data or knowledge. It is an entire construct built on restriction and imagination. It is to act as if one is god, and because the ego is so strong, it refuses to subordinate the self to reality. But reality being reality, it cannot be stamped out. Denying it seems to only stamp out our connection to and interaction with it.
 

luc

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Notice her evasive responses when Lionel repeatedly points out the necessity of context. There seems to be this fundamental denial of context/reality, which is really something to see.
Yes, quite something. Speaking of context, this Count Dankula (the guy with the Hitler salute dog) video is pretty great:


A bit difficult to understand, but look how he owned this reporter! As you said, if you don't allow context and nuance to be taken into account, you completely lose any connection to reality.
 
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