Lord of the Rings

SlipNet

Dagobah Resident
I've just had a decent festive period where I've rewatched the extended editions of the Lord of the Ring trilogy. Actually I watched the Hobbit films too. My god, one film per night, I have had a great time. I came on here expecting to find a thread devoted to the films but I couldn't find one. Upon this moment, I realised that I figured that this situation must be remedied. These films are absolutely outstanding in my view. The characterisation, set design, acting, effects, music, are all incredible. The overall concept is so interesting; men, dwarves, hobbits, elves, goblins, orcs etc., I am astounded by the scope of Tolkien's imagination. He apparently crafted this tale over a decade where he also held down a full-time job teaching. Amazing!:cool2:

Some of the characters really interest me. Frodo, Aragorn, and Gollum. Frodo's experience with the corrupting influence of the Ring is an incredible story arc. Aragorn as the ranger, living in exile far from his destiny, ever watchful, sensitive, and with no fear of death. Gollum is a master creation. Once a mild river folk character, he is completely corrupted by the allure of a secret power. He pines for the ring like a jilted lover, and his division within, the battle for his soul is compulsive to view. The scene where he leads Frodo and Sam up the staircase is seared into my memory. How could any being lure two good souls to such a devastating fate? I was breathless watching these scenes, and I've seen these films numerous times, just fabulous film-making. There are too many scenes to mention in terms of memorable moments, I have just this little excerpt below to show the torment and pathology of Gollum below.


apparently only the Bible sold more copies than the LOTR in terms of booksales in the 20th century. What an achievement by Tolkien, and duly also to Peter Jackson in translating this series into three wonderful movies. I'm going to ponder some loose threads in my mind about these stories, such as corruption, mental hygiene, industry, brotherhood, courage, care/attention, love, pscychopathy, schizophrenia, just too many subjects to mention. I love these films and will be reading the books this year. Any fans on here guys and gals, any fans of the series, be it in book or film form? I'd love to read any responses because I consider this trilogy to be great art and arguably the best 3 films in my movie collection.
 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
I'd love to read any responses because I consider this trilogy to be great art and arguably the best 3 films in my movie collection.
I was just planning to go to bed and stumbled across your post.

There's no other story more important in our household. It's like a common law.
Occasionally we break into endless quoting with son being the king of written text; woe to the innocent visitor who has the dubious honour to spend a long LOTR movie night with us crying, yelling, citing...running for handkerchiefs.
One time a year we try to meet for a LOTR-weekend.... 2021 it just didn't happen. 2022 this must change.....soon.
 

SlipNet

Dagobah Resident
There's no other story more important in our household. It's like a common law.
Occasionally we break into endless quoting with son being the king of written text; woe to the innocent visitor who has the dubious honour to spend a long LOTR movie night with us crying, yelling, citing...running for handkerchiefs.
One time a year we try to meet for a LOTR-weekend.... 2021 it just didn't happen. 2022 this must change.....soon.
Awesome! I must admit I was teary-eyed on many occasions, and this is on repeated viewings. Like you I tend to watch the entire series once a year. Nothing in film has moved me to the extent of these movies. I come away from them inspired to be a better person, and it's entirely intuitive, no logical reasoning involved. I just feel it, and then it happens. Tolkien tapped into the human experience to a photo-realistic degree. If I was a LOTR character, then I'd most definitely be a Hobbit. That's just where my personality would fit. Some of my friends are more like elves though, they think they're immortal, lol.:-D I can't wait to get into the books and marvelling at how Tolkien crafted entire cultures and languages, so much to look forward to. Great art is food for the soul.

Thanks for your reply Tauriel, it gladdens my heart that 20 years on these films are still gathering spiritual traction. :-)
 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
Nothing in film has moved me to the extent of these movies. I come away from them inspired to be a better person, and it's entirely intuitive, no logical reasoning involved
That's pretty much how I feel after watching them.
Inspired to being a better person, more dignified, honourable, brave.

So it sounds as if you haven't read the books yet. I cannot be sure whether knowing the movies prior to reading the books is a good thing or not.
The books have many more story lines. Tolkien loves to dwell in detailed descriptions of landscapes; beings like Tom Bomdadil and Goldberry, for example, you won't find in the movies; the whole history of Middle Earth is only given a rough outline in the movies.
For getting the whole gist of said history one must read the 'Silmarillion' which most people just give up on because Tolkien gets deep into genealogy and the past.
Anyway, I wish you lots of fun with the books.
Son (the 'master quoter') just said that you might even have an advantage knowing the movies and that you just have to keep an open mind so as not to judge some characters by what you might know from the movies.

A little anecdote on the side: my son must have been about 6 years of age. We had the extended version on video tape and he begged and begged to watch LOTR. So what we did was, we started the movie with 'Life in the Shire" and the moment the black riders appeared we fast forwarded and tried to obscure the screen. So we did a lot of fast forwarding and obscuring for quite some time.
My son never became tired of it.
One afternoon he begged again, my then hubby agreed, started the movie and fell asleep.
So that was it....the dam was broken and ever since the fast forwarding had been stopped.

We didn't pass on any religious ideas to our kids. So whatever they have as a moral and ethical grounding is based on the 'LOTR'.
In hindsight I believe, we could have done worse.
 

Claus

Jedi
Reading the book after watching the movie was very well for me, so I think you will like the book, even after watching ;)
You will see the movie afterwards with different eyes. I have to say, that I like the movie either, but now I miss things, that were in the book, but not in the movie. In the movie are also addet scenes, that never were in the book.
 

Tuulikki

Jedi Master
I watch the Lord of the Rings series and the Hobbit films whenever the opportunity presents itself. The films are complete and total masterpieces of film art. The casting is inspired to my mind. Exactly the right actors played the right roles for them. Everything is fit for purpose - the fabulous landscapes, the costumes, the frighteningly evil orcs, the incredible language and names. The genius of Tolkien is beyond words. There is also the immense backstory that is not common knowledge. I always have tears in my eyes when Frodo says goodbye to his travelling companions for the last time before departing Middle Earth forever and also at the death scene of Thorin Oakenshield after his defeat of the pale orc Azog.
 

ryu

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I love the Middle Earth universe too, with its legends, its mythologies, its stories. I think I've read all the books Tolkien wrote. I grew up with this, Narnia and Harry Potter, but LOTR is the best by far IMHO. I got the full edition of the trilogy at home, with the appendices which explain who the films were made. That was a labor of love.

It's really an epic journey about friendship, loyalty, love, honor and so many positive values and role models. It makes you want to be a better person, it shows that every act of goodness no matter how small, counts.
 

SlipNet

Dagobah Resident
So it sounds as if you haven't read the books yet. I cannot be sure whether knowing the movies prior to reading the books is a good thing or not.
The books have many more story lines. Tolkien loves to dwell in detailed descriptions of landscapes; beings like Tom Bomdadil and Goldberry, for example, you won't find in the movies; the whole history of Middle Earth is only given a rough outline in the movies.
For getting the whole gist of said history one must read the 'Silmarillion' which most people just give up on because Tolkien gets deep into genealogy and the past.
Anyway, I wish you lots of fun with the books.
Son (the 'master quoter') just said that you might even have an advantage knowing the movies and that you just have to keep an open mind so as not to judge some characters by what you might know from the movies.

I think I'll get the Silmarillion too later in the year, can't get them at the moment because I spent way too much money over Christmas. I don't think reading the books after the films will be too bad. I saw numerous Dracula adaptations prior to reading Stoker's novel with no problem

Reading the book after watching the movie was very well for me, so I think you will like the book, even after watching ;)
You will see the movie afterwards with different eyes. I have to say, that I like the movie either, but now I miss things, that were in the book, but not in the movie. In the movie are also addet scenes, that never were in the book.

Many people have mentioned to me that Tom Bombadil was omitted by Jackson because the story would drop in pace if he was included. I look forward to reading the books for a richer appreciation of the minutiae of Tolkien's vision. Apparently Christopher Lee read the LOTR books once a year, for pure pleasure. He was excellent as Saruman.

The casting is inspired to my mind. Exactly the right actors played the right roles for them. Everything is fit for purpose - the fabulous landscapes, the costumes, the frighteningly evil orcs, the incredible language and names. The genius of Tolkien is beyond words. There is also the immense backstory that is not common knowledge.

Yeah, the casting is spot-on, isn't it? They own those roles for life now, You can tell that these films were a real labour of love for Jackson and the entire creative team. When I watched the blu-ray "making of" featurettes and documentaries, I was astounded by the sheer scale of the undertaking. Hundreds of super-skilled artists at the very top of their game. Tolkien was truly a genius, but also I think Peter Jackson is too.
 

SlipNet

Dagobah Resident
It's really an epic journey about friendship, loyalty, love, honor and so many positive values and role models. It makes you want to be a better person, it shows that every act of goodness no matter how small, counts.

I think it may well prove to be one of the greatest stories of all time. When was it published, in the early 1950's? Its legacy is assured now, it will only grow from here. I totally agree with you about the inspiring quality of the tale as well. However humble your origin, you can as a person be a significant force for good in the world, and that's a wonderful realisation.
 

Palinurus

The Living Force
When was it published, in the early 1950's?
According to the issue I have, it was published in 1955 by Allen & Unwin Ltd in London.

I only heard about it much later during my student years only, because several of my friends were constantly marveling about it.

My first edition (Dutch translation) was in paperback (three separate volumes). Later on, I also bought the thin-print edition in one volume. I've read it many times over.

As for the movies, I can only echo what already has been said. I own the DVD's which allow for viewing the theater version as well as the extended one. I only once viewed the theater version, out of curiosity really; but I watched the extended version many times: about once a year since I have them. Although the story is super familiar by now the films never cease to amaze me and I truly think that as a work of art they are -and will stay- unsurpassed for a long time to come.

Every time I watch them again I discover new details and gain better insight in 'how they did it' technically. So yes, definitely an aficionado!
 
I read the Lord of the Rings as a teenager and it was a magical experience. I felt privileged to be able to introduce these books to my children and then later on to my grandchildren. My daughter came to me and said she wanted me to be the one to introduce these books to her children and that was such a meaningful experience. Like passing down a priceless family heirloom of love, adventure, friendship and the capacity for greatness that is within all of us.

On a lighter side, comparing the adventure of the Rings to doing the work, don't be these guys. 😋

 

Miracle

Jedi
FOTCM Member
LOTR makes me cry in the best way every time! I really don't think you can go wrong with reading/watching the books/movies first/second as long as you do both ;-)

The sheer quantity of iconic scenes is overwhelming and could be discussed for days, but this one in particular I find to be my favorite:

 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
I read the Lord of the Rings as a teenager and it was a magical experience. I felt privileged to be able to introduce these books to my children and then later on to my grandchildren.

So I thought it to be an overstatement when I secretly called LOTR our bible but reading all the comments here I'm not so sure anymore.

Son just gave 'The Hobbit' to his half-brother (6 years) as a christmas gift. After a short discussion what might be a nice present we both stated firmly, "Tolkien, one cannot start early enough."

Obviously in our morally flexible times the need for an epic story as a moral compass just called for Middle Earth and Tolkien provided.
 

Michael B-C

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I've just had a decent festive period where I've rewatched the extended editions of the Lord of the Ring trilogy.
Having just completed our annual Christmas vigil of watching in digestible chunks (half a film at a time) - you guessed it - the extended versions back to back, I pottered off to bed last night silently musing '... it surprises me that there is no LOR thread on the forum - must kick start one off tomorrow and see if there are any other equally crazed Tolkien folk out there!'

So, I open up the main page this morning and top of the thread list, low and behold...!

So, thank you SlipNet. :clap:

The one personal, thoughtful, direct intrusion into my life my departed papa ever managed happened one summer holiday around my 14th year on middle-earth. I cannot recollect the context now, so all I remember is him saying, 'Hold on a moment there!', before disappearing on a mission into his sitting room and then returning almost immediately with an already well-worn, red backed volume in hand, which he solemnly passed over saying as he did, 'I think you're old enough to take this on. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do'. Having been brought up on a diet of Grimm fairy stories, followed by Narnia followed by Norse myths and Arthurian legends, (as well as actually living in the Shire! I kid you not!), I guess he knew what was best for me - and so it proved.

I don't think I put it - or the subsequent volumes - aside once other than to sleep. I can still vividly remember lying on my back under my mother's piano (where for some reason I was reading on one particularly bright sunny day) staring vacantly up at its dark under-bones in shocked despair for what seemed forever, having just read of Gandalf's apparent demise on the Bridge of Khazad-dûm. Life no longer seemed worth living!

Once I closed the third volume I decided life was definitely over - so I just started immediately again on page 1!

I read it 6 times in total before I was 30. Then came the Silmarillion (truly astonishing, especially the second time around when I was more able to deal with its dazzling archaic brilliance) and eventually the films.

For me of the three, the extended Fellowship of the Ring towers above the rest (though that in no way diminishes either of the others). I truly never tire of it. The richness of story and character development, the contrast between the epic and the intimate, the grace and the integrity, and the deep and true tragedy of Boromir (superbly captured by Sean Bean - he who would not ride a helicopter to location shoots, preferring a 4 hour hike up the snowy mountains rather than brave its irregular buzzing flight!). This year in particular it moved me deeply - and almost made me want to write again...

So many truly divine moments, but a special personal nod to Galadrial's gift giving:


And despite it being a Jackson inspiration not a Tolkien take, the divine arrival of Arwen and her ride to the Ford of Bruinen.

'If you want him, Come and claim him!'


All my family are converts too - especially my daughter who at 16 lives and breathes by it. Her Andy Serkis Gollum impersonation is truly terrifying!

I cannot imagine my life without the unending gifts of this tale in whatever form (including the wonderful 1981 BBC radio dramatization).

Wonderful to read all your memories and thoughts and how much this incomparable masterpiece has shaped your lives and imaginations (fantasy my fiddle!!) Fodder for the soul in an encroaching time of shadow and ash.
 

Gandalf

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I think it may well prove to be one of the greatest stories of all time.

I read the story many years ago (Silmarillion - Bilbo the hobbit and Lords of the Rings), and I just loved it. For me it was one if not the greatest stories of all time for that kind of stories.

But, right now I am reading The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan (15 huge books or 29 pocket book) and it is truly amazing.

So if you have really appreciated The Lord of the Rings, give it a try.
 
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