Post op confusion

Thebull

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
My Dad has just had a knee replacement operation. Unfortunately hes now suffering from post op confusion. He's trying to walk and is very confused though coherent. It happened the last time he had a major op around 10 years ago and it's like deja vu. He suffered for nearly a month last time so hopefully he'll recover quicker. I was wondering if anyone could offer any advice. He's obviously in a great amount of pain but it's very concerning as Hostpital short staffed and trying to walk so soon unaided can't be good. Just worried when we're not there! Any advice would be appreciated.
 

Debra

Jedi
Oh, man, this is something I have experienced with Loved Ones and it is so scary and I deeply feel for you.
I am guessing he is in his late 60's early 70's?

Watch closely for any other weird signs.
Don't let him be ignored by the Dr, if he is behaving"out of Character".

Fluids, lots of fluids to help flush the toxins out, especially distilled water.
Take him good bone/meat broth in a thermos.

Try to be there with him, or do so in shifts with other family and/or friends.

If it is the same anastasia that was used, odds are he will be as confused as he was before, for as long.
I will hold you both in my Heart, and I hope for the best for your Dad.
 

Konstantin

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Sorry to hear this. Recently one neighbour who is in his 70, has a kindey operation. After he woke up he run away from hospital bed and the security found him in the yard and he was so confused that he thought that somebody kidnaped him.
His family was very upset. Somehow they menaged to keep him in hospital for a few more days and he was much more aware of his situation. It was a reaction to anestetics. As soon as all these toxins were flushed out of his system in a few days he was on his own.
Today he is totalt fine.
So , i guess the main thing is to detoxify him.
Take care.
 

Thebull

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Oh, man, this is something I have experienced with Loved Ones and it is so scary and I deeply feel for you.
I am guessing he is in his late 60's early 70's?

Watch closely for any other weird signs.
Don't let him be ignored by the Dr, if he is behaving"out of Character".

Fluids, lots of fluids to help flush the toxins out, especially distilled water.
Take him good bone/meat broth in a thermos.

Try to be there with him, or do so in shifts with other family and/or friends.

If it is the same anastasia that was used, odds are he will be as confused as he was before, for as long.
I will hold you both in my Heart, and I hope for the best for your Dad.
Doing the shifts and ensuring he's on plenty of fluids. Problem is he is strong willed and for his age physically strong and he wants to move. It like currently he doesn't realise he's had the op. The nurses are stretched and are struggling to keep up with their workload. Don't know where I could obtain distilled water.
I don't know whether I can offer some advice, Thebull, but I do know that my mother after her hip operation had to start doing exercises straight away, but with the help of a physical therapist. Will your father have physical therapy?
Yes that's should be happening but his confusion is stopping this he's actually too active. He also has a heamatoma on the wound that the weekend consultant will look at tomorrow.
Sorry to hear this. Recently one neighbour who is in his 70, has a kindey operation. After he woke up he run away from hospital bed and the security found him in the yard and he was so confused that he thought that somebody kidnaped him.
His family was very upset. Somehow they menaged to keep him in hospital for a few more days and he was much more aware of his situation. It was a reaction to anestetics. As soon as all these toxins were flushed out of his system in a few days he was on his own.
Today he is totalt fine.
So , i guess the main thing is to detoxify him.
Take care.
Yes good advice how can I help to detox him when he's under there care. I'm really concerned due to he might damage The new knee or the confusion could drag on like last time which was weeks! Thanks for your responses and concern.
 

Mariama

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Yes good advice how can I help to detox him when he's under there care. I'm really concerned due to he might damage The new knee or the confusion could drag on like last time which was weeks! Thanks for your responses and concern.
I'm no expert in this field, but perhaps you could try to find a homoeopathic solution, which you could give to him more easily? Also, several people here on the forum swear by Bach Rescue Remedy or other ones.

Do you know what usually calms down your father? Music, singing, reading to him, playing a game, watching television or what have you? Anything to distract him from his confusion and calm him down? Singing stimulates the vagus nerve,

If you can't find any distilled water, you could also make it yourself. You can find an appliance online which distils water. FWIW.
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Sorry for your father, I wish he will recover soon. For the distilled water you live in UK so surely you can find it in a pharmacy? they used to sell distilled water in pharmacy here in Spain.
 

Ina

Jedi
My younger daughter has very bad reactions to any anesthetic or painkiller based on morphine. We have to be very vigilant and as much as possible remind all rotating hospital caregivers from nurses to doctors to check everytime procedures or any change of medication are required. Hospitalization has become very traumatic because errors in drug administration have increased their frequency. All the best to your dad and google everything!
 

Jones

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Don't know where I could obtain distilled water.
Steam distilled water can often be found in car accessories departments or shops - that's where I've found mine in the past. Often the type you find in supermarkets etc can be labelled 'distilled water', but when you read the fine print on the label, it's de-ionised and the process used often not disclosed.

It's concerning about your Dad wanting to move around while he's confused. It's one thing to move around with awareness that you've just had an operation, but quite another if you haven't got that awareness. I wonder if he's feeling a bit of fear or anxiety with the confusion and that's why he feel compelled to move? If so, I agree with any thing you can do to help him calm as well as the detox.

Firm but gentle touch or holding might help with the calming. Often in a state of anxiety or fear, the emotion can feel bigger than you, but with firm touch/holding it's kind of like being reminded where your edges are and that the fear/anxiety is actually smaller than you and can seem more manageable then. Defending self from the feelings of fear and anxiety can also look like anger, but it may not be real anger underneath. In any case, take care of yourself too.

I hope he recovers soon.
 

Mariama

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I wonder if he's feeling a bit of fear or anxiety with the confusion and that's why he feel compelled to move? If so, I agree with any thing you can do to help him calm as well as the detox.
That reminds me, people with dementia also walk up and down the corridors and there are even some buildings which are designed in a certain way, so they have enough space to move. Walking could be beneficial for the brain then and perhaps it aids detoxification?

There are some lovely essential oils which are sedative (lavender/orange EO) and grapefruit EO helps clear the mind (also detoxifies and stimulates the lymphatic system). But you would have to do some research yourself, since their effect can be quite strong, if you don't know what you are doing. I would sprinkle one drop on his pillow and take it from there. I sometimes sprinkle some EO on my collar or scarf, but be careful that these EOs don't touch the skin!

Grapefruit EO is also uplifting, because of its antidepressant property. Hope this helps, Thebull. Aromatherapy An A-Z by Patricia Davis is a comprehensive guide IMO.
 

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I'm no expert in this field, but perhaps you could try to find a homoeopathic solution, which you could give to him more easily? Also, several people here on the forum swear by Bach Rescue Remedy or other ones.

Do you know what usually calms down your father? Music, singing, reading to him, playing a game, watching television or what have you? Anything to distract him from his confusion and calm him down? Singing stimulates the vagus nerve,

If you can't find any distilled water, you could also make it yourself. You can find an appliance online which distils water. FWIW.
Bach rescue medicine can contain gluten. Please check

Rescue® Remedy FAQs
Gluten free? Yes
Rescue Pastilles are not gluten free
 

Thebull

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I'm sat with my Dad and thankfully he's calmed down alot. Though not yet himself he seems comfortable which is a great relief. Funny you mention the rescue remedy may contain gluten he's only just been diagnosed as a celiac.

Fingers crossed he's starting to improve and we can concentrate on the rehab for the knee. I really feel like leading up to the full moon I think it was Thursday. We've been dealing with some serious negative energy. I'm not just talking about a personal level it's been felt everywhere no matter how conscious individuals are. I've listened to people talking and people are been challenged. hopefully this energy is now on the wain. It's felt like an external thing influencing events. It's been a challenging week personally and I don't think I'm the only one who's felt this.
 

Jenn

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I had a quick search online and found these NHS guidelines which may be what the physical therapists stick to. There's this one too which also suggests that walking initially is not a problem (provided he is careful).

joint replacement guidelines.jpg
If the physical therapy doesn't start soon, I would definitely chase it up. From what I understand movement initially is not a bad thing, and could help wound healing (providing it's not excessive and doesn't damage the scar, and no trips and falls which could disrupt the replacement).

If he is in confused state, I wonder if it would be worth suggesting to him that he can do some movements and bed exercises only when you arrive and with a walker, so that you can do it together and he can safely move about without falling over. Do you think he would remember that you had discussed that, or does he appear to be forgetting things and disoriented?

On another note I would second what Jones said about touch. I remember reading in Peter Levine's book "How the body releases Trauma" that when he had his road accident, he was going into stress response and panicking and a random lady came over and just held his hand. He said that this was like a life-line for him and helped him to get through the experience. You may find that just a hand hold helps at some level, and if he allows you, a hand massage may help to soothe him too. Or you could try and bring a music player with his favourite music on to help stimulate his brain.
 

Thebull

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Another improvement today which is great and the haematoma on his leg us improving from the operation. He did physio today and did well from what I was told.

The confusion is still there and he is disoriented at times. Hopefully he can have a good night and he may be allowed home tomorrow or Tuesday. He looked so vunerable and had been upset about his confusion. He doesn't like the thought of himself been difficult. I'll feel better if he home before Thursday I've got s colonoscopy myself. I don't want to be too confident but fingers crossed I hope we've turned a corner.
 
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