Project MATHEMATICS!

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Project MATHEMATICS! videos explore basic topics in high school mathematics in ways that cannot be done at the chalkboard or in a textbook. They bring mathematics to life with imaginative computer animation, live action, music, special effects, and a sense of humor.

Young people are attracted to mathematics through high-quality instructional modules that show mathematics to be understandable, exciting, and eminently worthwhile. Each module consists of a video together with a workbook/study guide, and explores a basic topic in mathematics that can be integrated into any high school or community college curriculum. The modules encourage interaction between students and teachers.

Available titles does not relate to very complicate mathematic but can be helpful for young students. (The Theorem of Pythagoras, sines, polynomials, ...)

http://www.projectmathematics.com/
 

Michal

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Available titles does not relate to very complicate mathematic but can be helpful for young students. (The Theorem of Pythagoras, sines, polynomials, ...)

Hi,
Looks like that the address is not taking me anywhere anymore.
Instead I found Project Mathematics! videos from university of California and some accompanying materials that seem to match what You mentioned in Your post (11 years ago :) ). Thanks anyway.
_Project MATHEMATICS!
_Box
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hi Michal!

Thanks to the Waybackmachine the site is backuped here: Project MATHEMATICS!

So if we judge by the aspect of screenshots, what you found, are indeed the original videos :-)



In 2009 there was not so much materials available as today. Today, if you're a student and you don't understand a concept in the classroom, you've no excuse to get it at home because YouTube. That said, understanding does not equal practising.
 
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Michal

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Hi Michal!

Thanks to the Waybackmachine the site is backuped here: Project MATHEMATICS!

So if we judge by the aspect of screenshots, what you found, are indeed the original videos :-)



In 2009 there was not so much materials available as today. Today, if you're a student and you don't understand a concept in the classroom, you've no excuse to get it at home because YouTube. That said, understanding does not equal practising.
Hi Ellipse,
I am looking for some inspirational material for my son... and maybe myself also :). In his school he is doing basicaly since 3 years only additions and subtractions. I gues his teacher's favourite is accounting and she is basically concentrated on practical preparation of kids for 8th grade exams. I would like to show to him that mathematics is fascinating and as large as Earth and "accounting" is olny one state in a big country on the huge planet. So - thanks for link!!!
I keep on searching :).
Greetings,
Michal
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
With the perspective, what I would say to a child, it's :

1/ Train yourself. Train yourself until a type of exercise is fluid. As an adult we know that passed a certain point, the brain do things automatically without effort and it make all the difference for further progress and for exams.
Even if you have understood a math concept, without the practice you will do errors.

2/ If a step is not clear, ask. If you have all steps and the training, it will unfold easily.

3/ A day you'll have to learn a concept or to do an exercise that does not seems to make much sense. The point is the training, not the sense. It's just about the training, this is the important point. It's just a tool to make your neurons fight and be stronger.

---

When I was a child I was especially attract if their was a problem to solve. Perhaps you can search for such book dedicated to is age or books like "Secrets of Mental Math", "Visual Math", "Illustrated Maths Dictionary".

For later, there is interesting books like: "Everything You Need to Ace Math in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide" or "How to Be a Math Genius".

There is this one too: "Help Your Kids with Math"
 
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