Resurrection Ertugrul: An epic with heart and values

Revolucionar

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I agree that there are obvious 'short' cuts' and 'plot discrepancies' in the series, and they seem to increase towards the end of each season. I think this is understandable knowing the huge number of episodes they've made in such a short time period. Though, it makes you wonder why they thought they'd need so many episodes in the first place. In some cases it's obvious that they've come up with an 'emergency solution' just to get some 20 more episodes at the end. Regarding the translations, I think that as most of us (I suspect) are watching this series for free, we shouldn't criticize the quality too much – in my understanding the translations are mostly done by volunteers who do it for free.

After finishing the 'Dirilis Ertugrul' series I tried to watch a couple of episodes of its sequel, 'Kurulus Osman'. I have to say that it was a bit of a disappointment. First of all, without the actor who played Ertugrul the whole thing feels empty. In retrospect, the character of Ertugrul and the magnificent actor who played him was the very thing that gave the 'line of force' in the series. His way of dealing with manipulators and traitors, his famous 'stare' and his determination. The actor who plays Osman is not bad, he's pretty good, but he lacks the focused energy of Ertugrul. Plus, and here's a semi-spoiler, the actor who plays Ertugrul at old age in the Osman series is not the same. Again, he's not bad either, but lacks the energy and 'aura' of the original actor. In all, I perceived the actors in Osman to be poorer than in the Ertugrul series. Even one of my favorite actors from Ertugrul, Selcan Hatun, seems not to be performing at the same intensity and quality as before. Maybe it has to do with the script and directing, don't know. Or, maybe it's just fatigue withing the whole crew after going on so long.
We’re actually watching it on Netflix, so not for free. I haven’t yet watched a show with such bad translation on the platform. They only have the English subtitles, so I don’t know why they couldn’t invest some money in a couple of professionals.
 

happyliza

The Living Force
I too loved the show for all the lessons and stories from Ibn Arabi. Ertugrul and Suleyman, his father and mother Halime were brilliant too as was Selcan in many scenes. I have finished all the Osman back series a while ago so look forward to Thursdays when the new episode is aired with glee. I am also watching 'Once upon a time Cyprus' which is also fantastic but relevant as I live here - again very enoyable and looked forward to.
Do not be too disappointed with Kurulus Osman as is does leave you on a cliff-hanger every week and the actor has changed but the lessons are still great. It does get as good as Ertugrul in different ways - and justice is truly done too :-) Enjoy.
 

Navigator

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Been enjoying the series greatly, so far at the end of season 3. Here is an exchange between Ibn Arabi and our hero from season 1, episode 18, it doesn't actually contain any spoilers as it doesn't reveal much of what's going on, it was beautifully scripted:

Ibn Arabi: You know how this axe is made, right?

Ertugrul: Yes, I know well.

Ibn Arabi: A heap of steel become an axe blow by blow, beaten up endlessly. Well, do you know how miners make the metal and how leather man makes leather? If this piece of leather on you didn't get beaten blow by blow it would have become a piece of garbage. If it wasn't fired, the metal in your sword would still be a rock somewhere. What about you, Ertugrul? What would happen if you weren't tested? Do you know that?

Ertugrul: The problem is not only me being tested. My friends, my battle comrades, my family, my tribe who trusted me. The vizier who wanted to help me. They are all in difficulties because of me. The pain caused by this is burning my soul.

Ibn Arabi: Existence is a school, son. Everyone is a student. And God is the only Teacher. He manifests His Titles and test us. But distress or blessing, mercy or trouble is always from Him. Everyone lives their own exam. You need to be one of the people who pass the exam and submit yourself to Him. Then you would be the greatest warrior and the greatest hero.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Pepe Escobar has written an interesting article where he endorses a recent book about the Ottoman empire.


A couple of snippets:

Once upon a time in Anatolia, in the late 13th century a Turkic principality – one of many shaped in the wake of the Mongol invasion of the 1240s – consigned the Seljuk Turks to the past and emerged as the Ottoman emirate. It was named after its founder, Osman I.

By the middle of the 15th century, the time of the game-changing conquest of Constantinople by Sultan Mehmet II, the expanding Ottoman empire had absorbed virtually all its neighboring Turkic emirates.

And by the start of the 16th century, what sprang up was a multi-religious and multi-ethnic empire that – pragmatic and tolerant – ruled for four centuries over the Balkans, Anatolia and Southwest Asia.

Talk about a major historical riddle: How did a small principality in the western fringe of what used to be known as Asia Minor turn into what could arguably be defined as Islam’s most important empire?

Author Mikhail stresses right at the start that the Ottoman Empire was the most powerful state on earth – more powerful than the Ming dynasty, not to mention the Safavids – for quite some time. It was the largest empire in the Mediterranean since ancient Rome and “the most enduring” in the history of Islam.

Then he sets the crux of the – explosive – thesis he will develop in detail: “It was the Ottoman monopoly of trade routes with the East, combined with their military prowess on land and on sea, that pushed Spain and Portugal out of the Mediterranean, forcing merchants and sailors from these 15th-century kingdoms to become global explorers as they risked treacherous voyages across oceans and around continents – all to avoid the Ottomans.”

This thesis will be extremely unpalatable to a hegemonic (at least for the past 150 years) West, now confronted with its turbulent decline. Mikhail does his best to show how, “from China to Mexico, the Ottoman empire shaped the known world at the turn of the 16th century.”

The book he writes about is:

Alan Mikhail: God's Shadow: Sultan Selim, His Ottoman Empire, and the Making of the Modern World
 

Human

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
First of all, thank you everyone who recommended this show. It's great and a lot can be learned from it. I also recommend it.
Many of you have already written here quite a lot of good insights and reviews about it, so I'll just drop my few cents that haven't seen discussed so far.


We’re actually watching it on Netflix, so not for free. I haven’t yet watched a show with such bad translation on the platform. They only have the English subtitles, so I don’t know why they couldn’t invest some money in a couple of professionals.
Agree, especially later/last seasons, if the show wasn't so good it would probably repel me from watching it further. Which makes me wonder if it maybe wasn't done on purpose to annoy and repel people on West from watching it to the end? :-/

Nonetheless, the whole series was a pleasure to watch and it was a very nice distraction that also/even enabled some quality time for the "whole family" to spend together and discuss things and relations to our world today that aren't usually (or ever) seen on the TV. I also liked the emotional component of the series and even shed a tear or two at some scenes, not only because of 'negative' emotions but also a joyful ones.


After finishing the 'Dirilis Ertugrul' series I tried to watch a couple of episodes of its sequel, 'Kurulus Osman'. I have to say that it was a bit of a disappointment. First of all, without the actor who played Ertugrul the whole thing feels empty. In retrospect, the character of Ertugrul and the magnificent actor who played him was the very thing that gave the 'line of force' in the series. His way of dealing with manipulators and traitors, his famous 'stare' and his determination. The actor who plays Osman is not bad, he's pretty good, but he lacks the focused energy of Ertugrul. Plus, and here's a semi-spoiler, the actor who plays Ertugrul at old age in the Osman series is not the same. Again, he's not bad either, but lacks the energy and 'aura' of the original actor. In all, I perceived the actors in Osman to be poorer than in the Ertugrul series. Even one of my favorite actors from Ertugrul, Selcan Hatun, seems not to be performing at the same intensity and quality as before. Maybe it has to do with the script and directing, don't know. Or, maybe it's just fatigue withing the whole crew after going on so long.
Thanks for the heads-up; similar to what Gaby said in other thread, after watching Ertugrul, instead of Osman it would maybe be more useful to dive into reading recommended Romance Novels.


I agree that there are obvious 'short' cuts' and 'plot discrepancies' in the series, and they seem to increase towards the end of each season. I think this is understandable knowing the huge number of episodes they've made in such a short time period. Though, it makes you wonder why they thought they'd need so many episodes in the first place. In some cases it's obvious that they've come up with an 'emergency solution' just to get some 20 more episodes at the end. Regarding the translations, I think that as most of us (I suspect) are watching this series for free, we shouldn't criticize the quality too much – in my understanding the translations are mostly done by volunteers who do it for free.
I was really annoyed of the last 10 (Netflix) episodes of the last season, at that time not seeing why would they want to unnecessary prolong the show when, IMO, the story was nicely rounded at that point. But, the last episodes of the show really brought home several (important) messages for me - revenge in case of Sirma's end and Islam's connection to today SJW movement in scenes of Ertugrul's visit to Berke Khan.

I was a bit disappointed when Ibn al'Arabi left the show, although his religious successors like imam/hodja of Sogut had their moments in delivering some of the inside viewpoints of Islam, like explaining some of the names of the God/Allah to children in the school, they were more like a poor imitation of deep and profound messages of Sufism that Arabi conveyed in first half of the show.

Also, the shift in later seasons to more pronounced vengefulness/vendetta in a sense that revenge was sought for every offense, no matter how big or small it was, by the principle "eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth", compared to much more empathetic/loving and forgiving attitude at the beginning of the show, was a bit disturbing to me. That's not to say that justice was to be disregarded and that every offense should be forgiven, in case of Sirma and her sister Ilbilge at the end of the show it could be nicely seen how all-forgiving attitude can be a huge weakness and could potentially lead to a complete disaster, if offense is not treated properly and justly.

The show made me think about organized religions, Islam in particular, as a means of programming and propaganda, their influence on ordinary people lives, and inclusions of "small", on the first hand maybe no so important things/notions into religious doctrine that open a door to psychopathic corruption and contamination (ponerization).

At the personal level:
For example, obsession for blood revenge/vendetta that was present even in the 1980's (maybe even today) in Albania and some places in ex-Yugoslavia. From the show, I got the impression that this part of tradition (religion?) was there from the very beginnings. In the case of Sirma at the end of the show it can be seen how this can be used for personal psychopathic evil goals and also how this thirst for revenge, no matter how righteous person might seem in their pursuit for justice, can be corrupted and used by outside psychopathic forces for their purposes (Dragos with Ilbilge vis-a-vis charges of Gunduz killing her father).

At the group level:
I find it very interesting that nomadic way of life in Anatolia Seljuk state described in Ertugrul and high moral values of Islam, like fighting for oppressed and liberating them from tyrannical rulers, sound quite similar to what Thompson wrote about Assyrian war propaganda and conquest of Palestine (cited by Laura in Ch 10 of High Strangeness when talking about 'history' of Israel).

Side note:
I've been wondering how come the Islam became so popular in Afro-american community during (second part of) last century, and these values with their attractiveness to oppressed people kind of explained it. Of course I might be way of the mark here, so I'll appreciate if somebody can correct me.

When Truth&Justice are added to above mix of moral values and goals, as can be seen in Ertugrul show, one really gets something that looks quite close to the ideal doctrine.
With vengefulness present, together with high sense of one's moral rightness which is intrinsic to Muslims and Islam, IMO, we can get people who are more or less easily offended and ready to go up even to arms to defend their doctrine/programming and/or (personal) revenge. In itself, that's not such a bad thing, especially if thirst for Truth, real truth, is still present there and one would go an extra mile and give a benefit of a doubt just to be sure that the real truth is known and Justice is served justly. This can be seen at the end of the show when Ertugrul came to meet Berke Khan and appealed to his truth seeking nature to avoid being sent away or even killed, but to find a spy in his close ranks.
If this (personal) truth-seeking is corrupted, real Truth taken out from the ordinary people lives and brought to institutional level in the form of dogmas and/or given and assessed from some (high-er) authority figures, we end up with SJW movement where all "right" components of a ideal doctrine (e.g. Islam) are seemingly present. But, with above ponerization, its followers, with right emotional buttons pushed, will go to the very end for Justice; and even more, when a notion of a sacred martyrdom for the cause is there, then there's an army that will willingly go to their very death (or death of "others") just because (holly) authority said so.
 

Keit

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I finally finished watching Ertugrul. Not going to share any spoilers, but just wanted to reassure everyone who is still watching. That the ending doesn't disappoint, and that despite all the drama, the end is very much satisfactory like in romance novels. Well, not exactly like in romance novels. :-D but you get the idea.
 

happyliza

The Living Force
I finally finished watching Ertugrul. Not going to share any spoilers, but just wanted to reassure everyone who is still watching. That the ending doesn't disappoint, and that despite all the drama, the end is very much satisfactory like in romance novels. Well, not exactly like in romance novels. :-D but you get the idea.
I just finished the last in the Osman series too, and it was the same as you mentioned above too. Not sure when series 3 begins but am sure sad about not having my fave learning material to watch once a week :-(
 

happyliza

The Living Force

KURULUŞ OSMAN SEASON 3: EVERYTHING WE KNOW SO FAR​

The finale for Season 2 released on 23rd June 2021 and now everyone is wondering if the Turkish historical drama will return for Season 3.

Kurulus Osman is a hugely popular series which originally released on Turkish network ATV in 2019. It is produced by Mehmet Bozdag and directed by Metin Gunay.​

The series loosely follows the life of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire. Whereas the prequel Dirilis: Ertugrul (2014-2019) focused on his father. Both series have amassed a fanbase of thousands of people across the world who follow the show’s episodes when they release every week. Please note: This article may contain spoilers.​

So, now Season 2 has ended, will Kurulus Osman return for Season 3?​


KURULUS OSMAN SEASON 3: RENEWAL STATUS

  • At the time of writing this article, Kurulus Osman has not yet been renewed for Season 3. However, HITC does believe the series will return.

Our expectation that the series will return is based on the series is highly rated at 7.8 on IMDB, 3.7/5 on Facebook and 4.8 on Google reviews. In addition to this, while Season 2 has adapted much of Osman I’s real-life into the series, there are many important events of history, that have been left out.​

These historical events include battles, conquests, his family, death and Osman I’s legacy. All of which could be adapted into future seasons. Dirilis: Ertugrul had a total of 5 Seasons, the series is rated at 8.0/10 on IMDB, which isn’t too far off the rating for Kurulus Osman. This could be a potential indication of how many seasons Kurulus Osman will go on for.​

At this time, no information has been released by the director or production company to say the series will return. However, as stated earlier, we do believe it will, based on the information provided.​

KURULUS OSMAN: SEASON 3 RELEASE DATE​

As the series has not yet been renewed, there is no official release date for Season 3. Though, we are able to give a release date prediction based on the release of Seasons 1 and 2. HITC believes Kurulus Osman season 3 will drop in October or November 2021 following a 4-5 month break.
Filming for Season 2 was reportedly wrapped earlier this month on 12th June 2021. Meaning the cast and crew are free to begin production on the next Season. For the time being, the cast and crew remain tight-lipped about the future of the series.
Please note: This is a prediction. No official release date or details about season 3’s production have been released. For the time being, fans can recap with the trailer of Season 2 below:

KURULUS OSMAN SEASON 2​



Kurulus Osman Season 2

Kurulus Osman Season 2

PLOT FOR SEASON 3 EXPLAINED
Being that Seasons 1 & 2 included historical facts and have loosely followed the life of Osman I and those around him. We can expect the director and producer, to adapt more of his life into the series.
This also depends on how Season 2 will end, as we might catch the Byzantine and Mongol conflict in its entirety. We do expect Season 3 to show more of the intense battles that took place during Osman I’s lifetime.
Should the series follow a direct timeline for Season 3, we can expect to see the Byzantine-Catalan alliance and conflict. There is also the conquest of Yensehir and Bursa. However, this could be adapted into later seasons if the series continues.

Please note: As the series has not yet been renewed, no information about a potential plot has been made. Therefore, this section shows a plot prediction, not a confirmed storyline.


PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE SPOILERS ON THE SITE :-)
 

Navigator

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Well, my wife and I finally finished watching the series.

A total of 448 40-minute episodes, whew!

It was well worth it though, among the best ones I have ever watched. The story, characters, setting, the attention to detail, the music, etc. all combined in a VERY compelling way!

I do have a favorite season, number 4 comes at the top, followed closely by Season 3, and then Seasons 2, 1 and 5. Sadly, I was dissappointed with Season 5.

Seasons 3 & 4 have the drama with Emir Saddetin Kopek, the main villain of the series, who delivers what I believe one of the most memorable performances for a villan. As they say, a story is just as good as the villain is, and Saddetin never lets down. The character is a cunning, smart, charming and well mannered psychopath (but is he?) moving the strings at the top of the Seljuk sultanate. Very well performed by Murat Garipagaoglu.

I laughed, cried and screamed with this series, felt the rush of the battle, the exhilaration of victory, and sadness of loss and defeat. The dignity with which the fallen were treated, the respect for tradition, family and honor. Enjoyed the words of the wise men and women, but first and foremost, the integrity, vision and endurance of a true warrior, in the Castaneda sense, of the main character. It is no easy feat to portray and irradiate such essence and character even if scripted and performed by a well crafted actor, so kudos to Engin Altan Duzyatan for that.

Anyway, Duzyatan has a new series, the life of an Admiral in the Ottoman Empire, so far not translated to English, sadly:

 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Well, my wife and I finally finished watching the series.

A total of 448 40-minute episodes, whew!

It was well worth it though, among the best ones I have ever watched. The story, characters, setting, the attention to detail, the music, etc. all combined in a VERY compelling way!

I do have a favorite season, number 4 comes at the top, followed closely by Season 3, and then Seasons 2, 1 and 5. Sadly, I was dissappointed with Season 5.

Seasons 3 & 4 have the drama with Emir Saddetin Kopek, the main villain of the series, who delivers what I believe one of the most memorable performances for a villan. As they say, a story is just as good as the villain is, and Saddetin never lets down. The character is a cunning, smart, charming and well mannered psychopath (but is he?) moving the strings at the top of the Seljuk sultanate. Very well performed by Murat Garipagaoglu.

I laughed, cried and screamed with this series, felt the rush of the battle, the exhilaration of victory, and sadness of loss and defeat. The dignity with which the fallen were treated, the respect for tradition, family and honor. Enjoyed the words of the wise men and women, but first and foremost, the integrity, vision and endurance of a true warrior, in the Castaneda sense, of the main character. It is no easy feat to portray and irradiate such essence and character even if scripted and performed by a well crafted actor, so kudos to Engin Altan Duzyatan for that.

Anyway, Duzyatan has a new series, the life of an Admiral in the Ottoman Empire, so far not translated to English, sadly:

Thanks for the tip for the new series! I'm glad to see that Duzyatan is featuring in this new one, since he was such a marvellous and spot-on actor as Ertugrul. Let's hope this new series will be better than, in my opinion, failed sequel 'Kurulus Osman'. I've been sporadically watching the Osman series, but it gives the impression of a work done hastily – the storyline isn't that good, and the actors lack depth in their characters. Considering that Osman is supposed to be 'the one' who gives birth to a great nation, the actor portraying him sadly doesn't have the charisma to be convincing, IMO (as compared to Duzyatan, for example).
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've been watching a couple of episodes of the new series Barbaroslar and I have to say it's pretty decent. IMO, in any case it's better than the Osman series. The actors are chosen well to suit their roles and all the main characters act very well. The story and plot is not that spectacular but as in the Ertugrul series it 'thickens' and 'deepens' with time. After watching the first 15min of the first episode I was almost about to give up, since the first scene with the sea battle was a bit 'cringy' (e.g., the special effects illustrating the 'roaring sea' and the cannon balls bursting into the ships weren't that convincing), but as I watched some more and the action and scenery moved onto dry land it became way better. I guess one thing was also the fact of getting used to Duzyatan in his new role – you are so used to see him as Ertugrul so it takes a while to see him as Oruc.

After watching the first five episodes I'm quite pleased with the quality. Compared to Ertugrul this new series (at least so far) lack the deep spiritual and philosophical dialogues, and visions, although there's some of it here and there. Another thing that's poorer compared to Ertugrul, IMO, is the music. The fantastic ethnisic and etheric (remember those 'sighs' in Ertugrul when someone got wounded or died?) music in Ertugrul is not present in this new series – the music is more modern and leans towards the kind of music you hear in Hollywood movies. This may be because they are trying to reach an even wider audience by imitiating Hollywood, which is a mistake if you ask me.

Still, I recommend watching this for anyone who liked Ertugrul. The actors portraying them are way better than in most American series and the main characters are 'strong' enough to make it interesting.

I found the first 12 episodes with English subs here:

 

happyliza

The Living Force
'Resurrection: Ertugrul' star dies.
A PROMINENT Turkish actor Ayberk Pekcan, also known as Artuk Bey in the popular Turkish series Resurrection: Ertugrul, has passed away due to lung cancer.
Mr Pekcan had been struggling with cancer for a while.
Ayberk Pekcan, who was an actor in movies theatres and TV series was receiving treatment at a private hospital in Mersin. Mr Pekcan shared a message from his social media account on October 22 about his illness.
'I have lung cancer. The tumour has also spread to the liver and adrenal glands' Pekcan wrote.


So sad a lovely virtuous character in the series :-(. Wish he had been able to obtain the natural cures and treatments.
 

happyliza

The Living Force
We know that horses are social creatures. It’s been proven that their memories are outstanding. They not only understand our words and emotions, but they remember us as well. Janbi Ceylan is a horse trainer in Türkiye. Coming from a Circassian background, he lived in Russia, Jordan and Ukraine for years, and worked in circuses as an equestrian acrobat. He put all the knowledge and experience gained through his circus career into horse-whispering. Known for his ability to enter into the spirit of the horses and train them as well as his mounted acrobatics skills, Janbi Ceylan has even taken part in “Dirilis Ertugrul—one of the most popular TV series in Türkiye in recent years. #HorseWhisperer #HorseTraining


Good news site too!
 

CrystalMoon

A Disturbance in the Force
Thoroughly enjoyed this series. Loved the energy it propelled from the acting, to the horsemanship, to the fighting scenes, to the costume designs, to the fast pace story lines….yes, simplistic, but highly entertaining. Even having subtitles wasn’t an issue. If you missed lines here and there, you knew exactly what was going on. A far cry from the Hollywood CGI extravaganzas which are often soulless, and obscenely expensive to produce.
 
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