Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers

MJF

Padawan Learner
Although I am a Newbie, I thought it might be interesting to start a thread on science fiction and fantasy writers. If this is not the right place to post this thread or people feel it belongs under an already existing thread, then please feel free to say so. I am aware that Laura has already started a thread on romantic fiction and I thought this thread might develop people's interest in other genres of fiction and the ideas that are contained in the authors' works.

I must fist confess that I am not an avid reader of science fiction or fantasy works myself (I haven't even read the 'Lord of the Rings'). However, I have dipped in to science fiction from time to time. I recall when first reading Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' as a young man, the profound influence it had on me and how the book still does, as I see his fictional world becoming more real every day.

Why science fiction and fantasy though? Well I believe that science fiction and fantasy writers have had a tremendous influence upon shaping our modern world. Many of their works have been prophetic and sometimes inspirational. As a Star Trek fan, I was touched when I learnt that the actor James Doohan who played the engineer in the original series of Star Trek admitted that he used to receive a lot of letters from fans who stated that they were inspired to become engineers after watching him in Star Trek.

However, I would also like to draw out in this thread the background, beliefs and philosophies that led these writers to pen their works. More often than not they use their books to put over messages. Some of these messages may be quite esoteric in nature. Others are posting warnings, which sometimes paint a picture of a very dystopian future.

I recall that the C's once said that horror fiction writers such as Stephen King and Anne Rice were inspired by dark forces. However, what forces may have influenced science fiction and fantasy writers to write their books? The C's have also mentioned 'bleed through' as an influence upon creative people. This caught my attention when I thought of writers such as Philip K Dick and Gene Roddenberry. Dick, a self confessed gnostic, openy admitted that he thought he had received bleed through inspiration to write his works (possibly through the Black Knight Satellite). Roddenberry was supposedly inspired to create Star Trek from his channeling sessions in the 1950's with the Council of Nine (see attachment), which were run by a medical doctor named Andrija Puharich who had links to the CIA and the MK Ultra project (see 'The Stargate Conspiracy' by Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince for a full account of the story). However, other writers were clearly members of esoteric groups who used their books to get messages out to the public to help promote the groups' views. An example of such a writer is L. Ron Hubbard who founded the Church of Scientology. He was at one time mixed up with Jack Parsons (a rocket scientist and founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) an avid occultist and follower of the English ceremonial magician Aleister Crowley and leader of a lodge of Crowley's Ordo Templi Orientis.

Once you realise what lies in the background of these men and women, their works take on a very different flavour. I am happy to kick off this thread by discussing Lewis Carroll (Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898) an English writer renowned for his children's fantasy fiction, notably Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Carroll was a leading mathematician, a photographer, inventor and Anglican Church deacon. He was a first rate scholar and had a long term link with Christ Church College Oxford where he taught for many years and became the sub-librarian of the college library (which gave him access to a wealth of academic resources).

Carroll moved in various social circles including the Pre-Raphaelite art movement headed by John Ruskin and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. He was an early member of the Society for Psychical Research. What most biographies seem to leave out though, is that he was also involved with the Theosophy movement that brought him into contact with the likes of Annie Bessant, Madam Helena Blavatsky (the author of 'The Secret Doctrine') and Edward George Bulwer-Lytton (the author of 'The Coming Race' that introduced the concept of Vril energy that would later inspire the Nazis). Indeed, some think Carroll was in fact a secret rosicrucian.

With this in mind, when you read his works, you quickly become aware that he is trying to convey an awful lot more than a children's fantasy tale. I would refer people to a podcast titled 'Alice X in Cern Mystery School Wonderland' by the Dark Journalist that I have posted on the Atlantis thread (unfortunately the file seems to be too big for this thread) because it will give those interested in pursuing these esoteric links more detailed infomation about Carroll's sources and influences. The podcast is a veritable treasure trove of information and may explain the cryptic comment the C's once made to Laura:

“A: You are dancing on the 3rd density ballroom floor. "Alice likes to go through the looking glass" at the Crystal Palace. Atlantean reincarnation surge brings on the urge to have a repeat performance.”

It must be remembered that Carroll was a brilliant mathmetician and many believe he encoded hidden mathematical messages in his works for those capable of discerning them. If the Dark Journalist is correct in his analysis, then Carroll may be alluding, amongst other things, to 4th Density as represented by 'Wonderland'. It is curious in this respect to note that many who have worked at section 4 at Area 51 have referred to it as Wonderland. Even the use of the White Rabbit may be a reference back to the ancient motif of the 'Three Hares' found in ancient China, Persia, Egypt and medieval Europe that is a rosicrucian symbol.

Hence, it becomes readily apparent that Carroll's works are in fact laced with esoteric information that may have been an attempt by him at a deliberate disclosure of long held rosicrucian secret knowledge for those capable of understanding it. Although children to this day still love Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and the books have been filmed and televised on numerous occasions, for those prepared to re-read these books in light of the above, these works may now take on a completely different meaning.
 

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axj

Dagobah Resident
I have always liked science fiction for some reason. It seems to stir something within, maybe some sort of memory of earlier lifetimes or possibly even "future selves" or "parallel selves". Or simply the sense that life is full of wonders and can be much more than we are told.

One of my favorites is "Dune" which depicts the world 10,000 years in the future. It extrapolates from what we have now in creative and interesting ways. Also, the spiritual transformation process is depicted quite realistically in some ways, especially in the first book.

Among the famous science fiction authors, I like the books of Heinlein the most, such as "Friday" or "The Cat Who Walked Through Walls". They have a fascinating, light and endearing quality to them that is difficult to describe.

As far as creativity goes, the "Demon Princes" series by Jack Vance is quite unsurpassed, even by "Dune". It also depicts a possible future of humanity that has colonized a part of the galaxy, with wildly different cultures developing on different planets over time. The "demon princes" are sort of like criminal cabal bosses that the protagonist goes after.
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
Dagobah, thank for your comments. It is certainly the case that many science fiction writers have used alien worlds and societies to cast a reflection on our own society and current social mores. For example, Gene Roddenberry, who was a humanist, used Star Trek as a vehicle to promote his own aspirations for a more enlightened society, especially when you consider he was writing the early Star Trek at the peak of the Cold War. However, this is actually quite an old device when you consider Sir Thomas More wrote Utopia in the 16th Century as a means to depict his own ideal society. Many scholars also think Plato's description of Atlantis was not meant to be historical but rather a depiction of his idealised society (although I would tend to disagree as I think Plato, who was involved with mystery schools, almost certainly had access to secret esoteric knowledge).
 

Nienna

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I am aware that Laura has already started a thread on romantic fiction
Laura is encouraging us to read only the books she has recommended in the Romantic Fiction genre. She recommends them because they are books that can teach us something that many seem to be lacking in this day and age and they make us aware of many programs we are, and have been, running that we were previously unaware of. How to interact with others of both the opposite sex and the same sex. Laura isn't telling us to just read these types of books willy nilly. There is a specific purpose in reading those she has recommended.

I just want it to be clear about this as many people come to that thread thinking that it's a free-for-all to read any Romantic Fiction book. That is not the case.

I'm not bashing Science Fiction books as I've been a Science Fiction buff for quite a long time. I just want to let you all know what Laura is doing and why.
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
Laura is encouraging us to read only the books she has recommended in the Romantic Fiction genre. She recommends them because they are books that can teach us something that many seem to be lacking in this day and age and they make us aware of many programs we are, and have been, running that we were previously unaware of. How to interact with others of both the opposite sex and the same sex. Laura isn't telling us to just read these types of books willy nilly. There is a specific purpose in reading those she has recommended.

I just want it to be clear about this as many people come to that thread thinking that it's a free-for-all to read any Romantic Fiction book. That is not the case.

I'm not bashing Science Fiction books as I've been a Science Fiction buff for quite a long time. I just want to let you all know what Laura is doing and why.

Nienna, I take your point entirely. In some ways, I am hoping to do something similar with science fiction writers. Many people in the Cassiopaean community may have read science fiction works without really realising the background and motivations of the authors, which would then help to explain the messages they are trying to convey or promote in their books. Once you know what the author was about, you will be able to read their works with a more critical eye. Since you are a science fiction buff yourself, I would welcome any contribution you may have to make. I aim to add more postings about well known and lesser known writers in due course. Given many of today's scientists are avid science fiction readers, you can see through science fiction books what may be influencing them in their work. Arthur C Clarke is one example. In his book 3010: The Final Odyssey published in 1997, there are clear indications of the transhumanism agenda, where he predicts people will interface via a chip in their brain with supercomputers/the internet of all things.
 

Ina

Jedi Council Member
Nienna, I take your point entirely. In some ways, I am hoping to do something similar with science fiction writers. Many people in the Cassiopaean community may have read science fiction works without really realising the background and motivations of the authors, which would then help to explain the messages they are trying to convey or promote in their books. Once you know what the author was about, you will be able to read their works with a more critical eye. Since you are a science fiction buff yourself, I would welcome any contribution you may have to make. I aim to add more postings about well known and lesser known writers in due course. Given many of today's scientists are avid science fiction readers, you can see through science fiction books what may be influencing them in their work. Arthur C Clarke is one example. In his book 3010: The Final Odyssey published in 1997, there are clear indications of the transhumanism agenda, where he predicts people will interface via a chip in their brain with supercomputers/the internet of all things.
... The background and motivations of the authors.
That would be interesting. Do you have more details about Arthur C. Clarke? Have you read any autobiographies where a Sci-Fi author admits to any specific ideology being purposefully formulated and propagandized in their books? Should futurist or avantgarde authors be also included?

The first Sci-Fi books I read in my early teens were written by Jules Verne. Then I read all the books written by Russian authors and translated in Romanian of course, my mother had on her book shelves. Every year I remember reading short stories by many authors and published around Christmas as translated collections. Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov were sometimes featured among the authors. Science Fiction is one of my favorite literature categories and not because of the descriptions of technology or what technology can do or not but because it asks me to visualize, and I love visualizing stuff, so much so that many times when I read technical papers I visualize what I read. Going back to our issue, I also believe writing a Sci-Fi story, nevermind a book, it is a difficult task. Unlike any other genre, Sci-Fi novels cannot be researched and rely on an extremely prolific imagination combined with systematic thinking and capacity to detailed prototyping, that all have to make sense to a random reader. Think Leonardo Da Vinci.

Regarding your example and transhumanism, personally I would like to have a chip implanted so I can regain my vision in my left eye. I know my mother would do that as well to regain vision in at least one eye. Technology is not bad as long as it is not used as foundation or as main promoter of an or any ‘-ism’. Oh and another thing, I would prefer to be treated anyday by an Emergency Medical Holographic program (EMH) like ‘The Doctor’ in Startrek Voyager than to be subjected to WHO puppets.

So...
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
... The background and motivations of the authors.
That would be interesting. Do you have more details about Arthur C. Clarke? Have you read any autobiographies where a Sci-Fi author admits to any specific ideology being purposefully formulated and propagandized in their books? Should futurist or avantgarde authors be also included?

The first Sci-Fi books I read in my early teens were written by Jules Verne. Then I read all the books written by Russian authors and translated in Romanian of course, my mother had on her book shelves. Every year I remember reading short stories by many authors and published around Christmas as translated collections. Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov were sometimes featured among the authors. Science Fiction is one of my favorite literature categories and not because of the descriptions of technology or what technology can do or not but because it asks me to visualize, and I love visualizing stuff, so much so that many times when I read technical papers I visualize what I read. Going back to our issue, I also believe writing a Sci-Fi story, nevermind a book, it is a difficult task. Unlike any other genre, Sci-Fi novels cannot be researched and rely on an extremely prolific imagination combined with systematic thinking and capacity to detailed prototyping, that all have to make sense to a random reader. Think Leonardo Da Vinci.

Regarding your example and transhumanism, personally I would like to have a chip implanted so I can regain my vision in my left eye. I know my mother would do that as well to regain vision in at least one eye. Technology is not bad as long as it is not used as foundation or as main promoter of an or any ‘-ism’. Oh and another thing, I would prefer to be treated anyday by an Emergency Medical Holographic program (EMH) like ‘The Doctor’ in Startrek Voyager than to be subjected to WHO puppets.

So...
Ina, thank for your comments. Unlike many science fiction writers, Sir Arthur C Clarke was a real scientist since he held a degree from Kings College London in Mathematics and Physics and he served, for example, as the President of the British Interplanetary Society. He was also an early proponent of manned space travel. Indeed, his 1951 book, The Exploration of Space, was used by the German rocket pioneer, Wernher Von Braun, to convince President John F. Kennedy that it was possible for man to go to the Moon. I have looked into Clarke's background but can find no evidence that he belonged to any estoteric societies the way that L. Ron Hubbard and C.S. Lewis did. If anyone knows differently, I would like to hear from them. However, that does not mean he wasn't privy to inside knowledge since Richard Hoagland (the writer of Dark Mission and the man who helped to popularise the Face on Mars - as touched on by the C's), who knew Clarke, believed he may have been aware of certain things NASA may have discovered but hadn't made public. Some of this knowledge was apparently built into his screenplay for 2001 AD, his seminal work. However, my interest in him is more in his role as a futurist where he predicted decades ahead of time many things we now take for granted such as mobile phones and online banking. He was uncannily accurate in his future predictions.

I haven't read too many biographies by science fiction writers but I am aware that Philip K Dick, for example, was quite open in admitting his gnostic beliefs, which certainly did creep into his writings. I would like to do a piece on him in due course.

Yes, I would be more than happy to widen the scope of this thread to include futurist and avantgarde writers. I noticed you mentioned Jules Verne as being among the first science fiction writers you read. He was one of the fathers of the science fiction genre and was an early influence on Arthur C. Clarke. Perhaps you might like to do a piece on him in this thread?

I am not suggesting that all transhumanism is wrong since heart pacemakers, bionic limbs and other such bodily augmentations are certainly beneficial to people. Where I draw the line is where technology leads to mankind losing what makes us human. I wouldn't like to see mankind turn into the Borg as on Star Trek or the Cybermen as on Doctor Who (incidentally, the Cybermen were dreamed up by Kit Pedler a real scientist). What Clarke was suggesting in 3001 AD would, I think, be a step in that direction. If our brains were all linked up by interface to a super intelligent computer what would happen if it turned rogue like HAL in 2001 AD? FYI the EMH in Star Trek Voyager is one of my favourite characters too.

BTW: It was a 19th Century Russian cosmologist that inspired Wernher Von Braun to become a rocket scientist, which shows what an influence a writer can have.
 
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MJF

Padawan Learner
@MJF , a little ACC attention in the form of innedite information.
What I Found On Arthur C Clarke’s Bookshelf in Sri Lanka | Hacker Noon
Ina, thank you for the article. The photos were great. Sadly, Dave Prowse who played Darth Vader (James Earl Jones supplied the voice) in the original Star Wars movies has now passed on as well. BTW: Richard Hoagland has said that it was originally intended that the monolith in 2001 AD should take the form of a tetrahedron rather than a three dimensional rectangle. However, Hoagland thinks that idea was abandoned because it would have been giving too much away as regards clues to higher dimensional physics. Hoagland has written extensively on the subject of higher dimensional physics at his website and especially the importance of the tetrahedron. If you want to dive down the rabbit hole, I would recommend visiting his website.
 

Nienna

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
MJF, on this forum, we take a grain of salt with anything that Richard Hoagland says. He's a disinfo artist. If you use the search function, you'll turn up several posts about him. Here's one, along with what followed.

Have you read The Wave series?
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
MJF, on this forum, we take a grain of salt with anything that Richard Hoagland says. He's a disinfo artist. If you use the search function, you'll turn up several posts about him. Here's one, along with what followed.

Have you read The Wave series?
Nienna:

Yes, I have read the Wave series in the past but I hadn't followed the Comet Ellenin thread that you quoted. I get it that Richard Hoagland comes with a health warning. There is no question that he made a bad judgement call when he jumped on the Comet Ellenin bandwagon. However, that doesn't mean that everything he has said in the past is wrong. I see in the same thread that James Mccanney came in for criticism too. In the early years of the C's sessions, Hoagland was described by them as a genius and somebody who got under NASA's skin so much so that they were prepared to even crash a Mars probe (or so they said as it may have been taken black) rather than have it photograph the Face. On the credit side, it was Hoagland in particular that drew attention to the Face on Mars (confirmed by the C's as Atlantean made). He suggested that the lay out of the Cydonia region where the Face is located, points to a hyperdimensional physics. He also promoted the fact that Phobos, one of the moons of Mars, was a hollowed out asteroid and a possible space base for aliens (even Buzz Aldrin jumped on that wagon). I seem to recall that the C's confirmed this theory but I stand to be corrected. He has similarly suggested that Iapetus, a moon of Saturn, may be another hollowed out or artificially constructed space object. It certainly is a very anomalous body with a several miles high ridge running right around the moon like a cricket ball seam, where nobody to my knowledge has come up yet with a satisfatory explanation as to its formation. He was also a friend of Arthur C Clarke and may have been influenced by his Rama story, which involves a huge artificial asteroid like body that turns out to be an alien space vessel.

I am not here to defend him and it is possible that he has been coopted as a disinfo agent. He won't have been the first. However, I just think that you shouldn't throw the baby out with the bath water, since he has been right about a lot of things.
 

dreamer

Jedi Master
I recommend the Giants Series by James P. Hogan:

776489.jpg


THE MAN ON THE MOON WAS DEAD.

They called him Charlie. He had big eyes, abundant body hair and fairly long nostrils.

His skeletal body was found clad in a bright red spacesuit, hidden in a rocky grave.

They didn't know who he was, how he got there, or what had killed him.

All they knew was that his corpse was 50,000 years old; and that meant that this man had somehow lived long before he ever could have existed!

---

Hogan revealed in the introduction to the omnibus edition The Two Moons, that Inherit the Stars was inspired by a viewing of the film 2001: A Space Odyssey which he enjoyed until the ending. Complaining about what he saw as the confusing, effects-heavy conclusion at work afterwards, each of his colleagues bet him five pounds that he couldn't write and publish a science-fiction novel. The result was Inherit the Stars, which was published by Del Rey Books in May 1977. He later asked Arthur C. Clarke about the meaning of the ending of 2001, to which Clarke reportedly replied that while the ending of Hogan's Inherit the Stars made more sense, the ending of 2001 made more money.
...
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
MJF, on this forum, we take a grain of salt with anything that Richard Hoagland says. He's a disinfo artist. If you use the search function, you'll turn up several posts about him. Here's one, along with what followed.

Have you read The Wave series?
Yes I have read the Wave series but I hadn't seen the Comet Ellenin thread until now. I get it that Hoagland comes with a health warning but I see in that thread that James Mccanney also came in for a lot of criticism too. I think you must always show discernment when reading people's works since even well meaning people get things wrong. Hoagland certainly got it badly wrong with Comet Ellenin, there is no question about that. However, Ellenin was not the first space object that he has suggested could be an artificial or hollowed out space vessel. He has prior form since he also proposed the same about the Saturnian moon, Iapetus (which is certainly a highly anomalous body), the comet Vesta and the moon of Mars, Phobos. Interestingly, the C's backed him up on Phobos since it is, or was, a satellite occupied by the Greys. He was a friend of Arthur C Clarke, who in his book 'Rendezvous with Rama' promoted the idea of aliens using a very large cylindrical spaceship that initially looks like an asteroid to traverse the galaxy. Perhaps this led to him getting carried away by Ellenin.

I am not seeking to defend Hoagland since, as a figure in the public eye, he is no doubt ego driven to some extent. Whether he is a disinformation agent for the PTB or not, I don't know. He may have been coopted in that role but I am not in a position to judge. If so, he certainly wouldn't be the first. I do know though that he really got under NASA's skin, so much so that it looks as though the dark forces went so far as to crash a Mars probe (if that is what actually happened) to prevent it from being used to photograph the Face on Mars. The PTB certainly want to keep a lot of what they have discovered on Mars secret and were not happy about people like Hoagland trying to disclose it.

On the credit side, the C's did refer to him as a genius at one point. He was the man who did most to champion the Face on Mars, which the C's confirmed as being an Atlantean structure. He took a lot of flak over that from the scientific community. He has also promoted the hyperdimensional physics model, which is what I was referring to in my post. In his writings on this subject, he places a lot of emphasis on geometry, especially the tetrahedron, which I believe links with comments the C's have made to Ark and there is clearly something to what he says about the importance of the angle 19.5 degrees. Even disinformation agents can throw out bread crumbs worth following. Think of Courtney Brown in this connection and Paul LaVoilette too. I have read them both.

I find it ironic that Niall took an instant dislike to Hoagland when seeing him speak at a conference. I had the same experience when I attended a conference in London where Lynn Picknett was speaking amongst others. I spoke to her after the conference and casually dropped the C's into the conversation. If looks could kill, I would be dead now. Incidentally, she had been talking about Giordano Bruno at the conference, another highly ego driven person who made many enemies in his lifetime but was a genius too.

Yes, you must always be careful about people like Hoagland but I wouldn't necessarily throw the baby out with the bathwater either. Ironically, it was Hoagland's revelations about the Face on Mars that led me to the C's in the first place.
 

MJF

Padawan Learner
Sorry, I thought my first post had crashed so I ended up rewriting it.
Talking about Rama, it is interesting that Clarke uses Phobos as a lauch base for the space probe Sita that is sent to investigate Rama and the 'Biots' are genetically created biological robot hybrids (the Greys anyone?).
 
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