Signs in the Sky Northern Lights in Canada

Debra

Jedi Council Member
These were photographed March 24, 2020, @ 3AM in Saskatchewan, Canada. Photo credit Colin Chatfield
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The amount of pink is extraordinary. There may be a higher amount of particles in the Higher Altitudes above the planet.

From the web site linked:

"We don’t see red in the Aurora Borealis too frequently and the colour tends to be associated with intense solar activity.
Reds appear in the Aurora when solar particles react with Oxygen at higher altitudes, generally above 150 miles. At this height the Oxygen is less concentrated and is “excited” at a higher frequency or wavelength than the denser Oxygen lower down making reds visible."
 

guimondaniel

Jedi Master
This may be unrelated YET the colors are so strikingly similar. Regularly for the past few months, in eastern Canada, Québec, in the Laurentians at sunrise the snow and sky have a pink hue. It seems to me that the altitude here is not sufficient for a huge difference in concentration of Oxygen. Could the density of cosmic dust come into play and cause this?
Pink snow at sunrise, and dark brown skies at sunset? I mention it only because we have never noticed this in previous years?
 

Debra

Jedi Council Member
This may be unrelated YET the colors are so strikingly similar. Regularly for the past few months, in eastern Canada, Québec, in the Laurentians at sunrise the snow and sky have a pink hue. It seems to me that the altitude here is not sufficient for a huge difference in concentration of Oxygen. Could the density of cosmic dust come into play and cause this?
Pink snow at sunrise, and dark brown skies at sunset? I mention it only because we have never noticed this in previous years?
It isn't "unrelated". See if you can get some pictures!
Indications of more and more particulates in the stratosphere are becoming undeniable.

Last year there was a bit about it, due to the volcano in Russia. I posted about it on my FB page, with some links. I will check it and see if the links are still there.
Here is a bit from the Canadian Weather Network. with some interesting info:

"When Raikoke blew its top on June 22, 2019, it shot ash and sulphuric gas nearly 20 km up into the atmosphere, sending some of its particles right into the stratosphere (the second-lowest layer of the atmosphere, above the troposphere). Researchers using high-altitude weather balloons sampled this portion of the atmosphere over the central United States in August and found a layer of aerosols -- in this case, mainly sulphur particles -- 20 times thicker than normal. The most likely source for these particles? Raikoke, who's plume spread from Russia's Kuril Islands and stretched across much of North America, following the prevailing winds. "

 
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