The Ice Age Cometh! Forget Global Warming!

DianaRose94

Jedi Master
Little Ice Age lessons
The world’s last climate crisis demonstrates that surviving is possible if bold economic and social change is embraced . . .
The Little Ice Age is a history of resilience and surprises – Dagomar Degroot | Aeon Essays

an assortment of topics about humans adapting , especially in Europe . . . .

But that's the thing there won't be any bold economic and social change. Instead, we will have crisis after crisis until society reaches the tipping point and self-destroy (aided by natural disaster).
 

goyacobol

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Little Ice Age lessons
The world’s last climate crisis demonstrates that surviving is possible if bold economic and social change is embraced . . .
The Little Ice Age is a history of resilience and surprises – Dagomar Degroot | Aeon Essays

an assortment of topics about humans adapting , especially in Europe . . . .

Far less defensible assumptions that climate change has happened before and is therefore nothing to worry about – ahistorical nonsense often fronted by those who once denied the very existence of human-caused warming – pose even greater obstacles to urgent action. It is crucial that we expand the space between these harmful extremes. Writing more nuanced histories of past climate change is one way to do it.

Even though the historical Little Ice Age has never been attributed to "human-caused warming" , now the "climate change"/former "global warming" crowd is claiming they were aware of this Little Ice Age all along and take comfort in the stories of survival amongst the plagues and famines. Those who see the solar minimum approaching are just using "ahistorical nonsense" to distract from this "human-caused warming". It may be human caused in the reaction of the Cosmos to human orthogonal thinking but I don't think it is carbon emissions that are the problem in the larger scheme of things. They still think their "urgent action" to lower carbon emissions could do the trick.

At least they see the need for more nuanced histories of past-climate change to prepare for the next Ice Age.
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
For those who might have missed it on Sott, astrophysicist Piers Corbyn (brother of Jeremy) lays it all out:


 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Meanwhile,

Man dies and 300,000 in power cut after snow in France


Travel has been disrupted on roads, trains and in airports after heavy snow, with one man dead


A man has died, more than 300,000 homes are without electricity, and roads and train lines remain obstructed after heavy snowfall in southeast France.


Up to 20cm of snow fell across the Drôme, Ardèche and Isère yesterday (Thursday November 14), with up to 30cm recorded in places with an altitude of 300 metres or more.

A 63-year-old man died near Bourgoin-Jallieu, in Isère, as he was attempting to clear snow and a fallen tree from a blocked road, when another tree fell on him. Emergency services were called but were unable to revive him. Another man, aged 27, was also injured, and taken to hospital.

More than 300,000 homes remain without power after the snowfall caused trees to fall and bring down electricity lines in the area, electricity company Enedis said.

A major, 20,000 volt cable fell in Tournon-sur-Rhône (Ardèche); while another came down in the commune of Saint-Julien-en-Saint-Alban, over 25 houses; requiring the occupants to be evacuated by firefighters.

Enedis said: “Our teams have been deployed, but the situation is still developing.”

Train company SNCF has also confirmed that trains will be disrupted on several lines to and from Grenoble today, due to heavy snowfall, fallen trees, or trees that appear to be at risk of falling near or on to the tracks.

The lines Grenoble-Lyon, Grenoble-Valence and Grenoble-Veynes will be most affected. It will still be possible to travel from Grenoble to Lyon, but passengers will need to take “a detour” through Chambéry (Savoie) and Ambérieu (Ain) to do so, SNCF said.

Roads in the area also remain dangerous, with authorities in the Ardèche warning residents to avoid taking the roads completely. In a statement, the department said: “Driving conditions are very difficult. Many trees have fallen over on roads.”
Also in the area, heavy goods vehicles weighing more than 7.5 tonnes have been banned from major roads in the Auvergne Rhône-Alpes to avoid dangerous situations and to help “ease traffic”, confirmed motorway management company Vinci Autoroutes.

Airports in the area, including Lyon Saint-Exupéry, also experienced disruption including delays and cancellations.

Airport authority Aéroports de Lyon said it had delayed some flights due to the need to “de-snow” planes and runways, and that the snowfall had been “very heavy and sticky”, but said that the situation was becoming “resolved” by the evening. Passengers were advised to check their flights before travelling.

Orange weather warnings for more snow and ice had been in place the the area throughout the day yesterday, also including the Loire, Rhône, Saône-et-Loire - but all alerts across the country have now been lifted.
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
For those who might have missed it on Sott, astrophysicist Piers Corbyn (brother of Jeremy) lays it all out:


I responded to the above post, but by the time I was done, it did not fit the topic as well, as I would have liked, so I put it under: The politics of climate change: Green New Deal and other madness
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Assuming she even makes it across the Atlantic. This is not a good time of year to sail that route, and the weather is already nuts out there.
Maybe these guys can help her out:
Flying Around the World in a Solar Powered Plane

The journey took a very long time—505 days to fly 26,000 miles (42,000 km) at an average speed of about 45 mph (70 kph)—but pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg successfully landed the Solar Impulse 2 aircraft in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday, after flying around the world using only the power of the Sun. Solar Impulse 2 is a solar-powered aircraft equipped with more than 17,000 solar cells that weighs only 2.4 tons with a wingspan of 235 ft (72 m). Technical challenges, poor flying conditions, and a delicate aircraft all contributed to the slow pace. Gathered here are images from the record-setting circumnavigation, undertaken to help focus the world’s efforts to develop renewable energy sources.

Somebody supplied that yacht - why not a solar plane? And it's not like she's going to miss any school!
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
the weather is already nuts out there.
Maybe not the best time of year for a solar plane ride over the Atlantic. How about under it? Nuclear submarines are carbon free (if you don't count what's being exhaled/eliminated by the human operators)!

From wiki:
A nuclear submarine is a submarine powered by a nuclear reactor. The performance advantages of nuclear submarines over "conventional" (typically diesel-electric) submarines are considerable. Nuclear propulsion, being completely independent of air, frees the submarine from the need to surface frequently, as is necessary for conventional submarines. The large amount of power generated by a nuclear reactor allows nuclear submarines to operate at high speed for long periods of time; and the long interval between refuelings grants a range virtually unlimited, making the only limits on voyage times being imposed by such factors as the need to restock food or other consumables.

Current generations of nuclear submarines never need to be refueled throughout their 25-year lifespans.[1] Conversely, the limited power stored in electric batteries means that even the most advanced conventional submarine can only remain submerged for a few days at slow speed, and only a few hours at top speed, though recent advances in air-independent propulsion have somewhat ameliorated this disadvantage. The high cost of nuclear technology means that relatively few states have fielded nuclear submarines. Some of the most serious nuclear and radiation accidents ever to occur have involved Soviet nuclear submarine mishaps.[2][3]

 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Assuming she even makes it across the Atlantic. This is not a good time of year to sail that route, and the weather is already nuts out there.
As we can see in the tweet below, it was rough on Wednesday. If nothing else, she gets some life experience in a hurry, if that will help? Following the other accounts in the above tweet, a youtube channel turned up:
Sailing La Vagabonde. And a website: Sailing La Vagabonde | A Few Words Behind The Movies where there was a current map of the weather in the region they sail:
1573885437816.png
And their background:
We’re Riley and Elayna, an Australian couple documenting our journey traveling the world by sail despite no previous sailing experience. We’ve been filming it all on YouTube since 2014. We’ve crossed the Mediterranean, Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific, and are now raising our boy Lenny on our boat as well.

We’ve suffered terrifying storms, pirate scares, financial breakdowns, equipment failures, water shortages, and other interesting mishaps but we wouldn’t trade living on the Sea and going where the wind takes us for anything.

Greta is not the youngest, it looks like they have a baby on board. Apart from Greta, is it time to learn something about sailing, signs and times considered? In this thread we are maybe talking about ice breakers.
 
Last edited:

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
This is what maybe, underway here. The current cloud cover continues unprecedented since the beginning of the year.
With damage control already active.

[Mini glacial period] Does Europe enter the mini glacial period after the US? https://youtube.com/watch?v=0n9LKAmho-s Increased radiative cooling due to thinning of the thermosphere and a decrease in solar radiation in the winter generate intense cold waves. If the snow and ice area increases due to intense cold waves, the albedo (sunlight reflectance) will increase and the cold will stay
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom