The Mood Cure

Just finished another fabulous book, right in line with the diet and health posts here. The Mood Cure by Dr. Julia Ross. (These amazing books are practically falling into my hands now!) Below is a quote from a reviewer that explains better than I can.

Quote from Martin Brodeur
"The book has a good name given its content: The Mood Cure is intended for those who are in search of a cure for their mood. According to Julia Ross, much of the psychological suffering we endure in North America is due to our bad nutrition. She suggests us an interesting way of alleviating this pain and maybe do the first steps towards a renewed and freshened life so as to get our mood cured. The book is talking about how our mood relates to the food we eat. It aims at relieving sadness and heavy feelings by ensuring she gets the key nutrients missing in our brain. The solution lies in a knowledge of which chemicals are necessary in our brain to create "good moods". Conversely, knowledge of how "bad moods" are caused up with the depletion or proliferation of different chemicals in our brain is necessary. Knowing how moods are made present by these chemicals is then put in relation with the food we eat.

The book starts with four questionnaires aimed at determining what kind of problems you may have with your brain. The first is called "Are You Under a Dark Cloud?", the second "Are You Suffering from the Blahs?", the third "Is Stress Your Problem?" and the fourth "Are You Too Sensitive to Life's Pain?". These four charts list the symptoms of what her team in San Francisco have determined to be general categories of uneasiness that are linked to particular causes. Each chart identifies specific substances that, when insufficient, can lead to the symptoms the chart indicates. In the case of the first chart, low-levels of serotonin are the cause. In the case of the second chart, depletion of catecholamines' and thyroid functions under normal are the cause. In the case of the third chart, adrenal overload is the cause. And in the case of the fourth chart, it is low levels of endorphins that are at fault. In all cases, it is depletion of a substance that drives the bad mood. And it is essentially because our bad eating habits have destroyed our reserves of these basic good mood nutrients that we need to be hoisted up.

Her experience as a nutritional psychologist has shown her that even if people started to eat well (lots of proteins and vegetables) and stopped eating junk food, the relapse was too hard to be shunned for most of them, as the call for coffee or tempting foods, such as sweets and refined starches, took them over. People with depleted stocks of essential nutrients are low to build them up again, and before the stocks rebuild, many of her clients did fall.

Around 1980, Blum's results concerning amino acids on alcohol as well as drug addicted individuals came to Ross' attention: Blum found that "the addicts who took the amino acids were able to stay away from drugs and alcohol. Those who took no aminos had four times higher relapse rates" (p. 7). This is the heart of the book: Ross suggests using amino acids as a spring-board to avoid relapses when we make our first steps towards a good mood nutrition. In fact, the four charts are based on relapses and on our addictions. All these are normal for Ross: our addictions rest on the fact that we are using this very addiction to boost, artificially though, the now depleted but usually present substance. For example, in the case of the second chart, it is normal that one of the symptoms is "Do you feel the need to get more alert and motivated by consuming a lot of coffee or other "uppers" like sugar, diet soda, ephedra, or cocaine?" (p. 17) since these substances increase catecholamines levels temporarily, but leaving your body totally depleted afterwards in catecholamines, which means that you'll further seek these substances, which gets you in a circle that doesn't break. Her solution is that our addictions should to be replaced by nutritional supplements that will naturally fulfill the needs of our body. This is the very reason why we get to know the aminos that are missing in our brain so that we start right now building up our stocks.

Our knowledge in the field of neurotransmitters has shown links between the mood of people and their inner balance of elements in their brain. Neurotransmitters are chemical elements that are necessary to the neurons to "communicate" with their neighbours: these substances are the messengers. These are in fact interacting in the neighbouring of the contact of two neurons: this is the interface where all of human cognition is centred. Imagine: millions of neurons interconnected in this way constitute our intelligence, solely.

But when we get to feel bad and low, researchers have identified that we are then low on certain of these neurotransmitters. A chief one is serotonin, a natural element present in all of our brains. This lays the bases for pharmaceutical companies who produce antidepressants like Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, etc.: knowing what deficiency a brain has (serotonin here), we will try to tweak in some artificial reaction that can help to sustain the element that interests us. These antidepressants have, to a variable extent, an effect on the subject that is usually beneficial but often unstable in many cases, coming with numbers of side effects. In fact, it is a very known fact that almost all of antidepressants have a long list of side effects. We are tempted to think that maybe an artificial solution isn't the right one after all? That is what Ross believes. And this explains her enthusiasm.

She gives us the example of the SSRI's. They are technically called "selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors" (SSRI's). Here's basically how it works. When the day finishes off, serotonin, from the catecholamine family, breaks into melatonin and 5-HIAA. So, said the biochemical scientists of these companies, since serotonin is the element we are interested in, let's stop the normal reaction that converts serotonin into less complex forms. "The individual will be better " they thought. The idea, essentially, is fine. But they didn't foresee that melatonin and 5-HIAA were also essential to a good mood! In fact, melatonin is a very good molecule, by getting us to sleep, and 5-HIAA, by being an efficient protector against "negative moods like violent crimes, suicide, severe insomnia and addiction" (p. 224). Our body was designed so that serotonin decomposes itself into the forms of melatonin and 5-HIAA: that's the way our body was built, naturally. It is then more than normal that major side effects to SSRI's (except Prozac) are bad sleep and violence (either internally or externally directed)! The thing is: natural substances like serotonin and melatonin and 5-HIAA can't be patented. They are, let's say, public. So why then do you think the child in our schools are getting Prozac and other drugs? Ross shows evidence that these natural ways of balancing our moods are often more effective than the artificial ones… and without the well-known side effects.

In the case of SSRI's, she proposes an interesting alternative: the amino acids. These are "concentrates of common proteins found in food" (p. 7). Instead of going for artificially acting antidepressants and the like, she urges us to go for what our brain naturally asks for, simply, certain proteins in a sufficient amount. In the case of serotonin, she asks us to get serotonin boosters, simply, like 5-HTP and Tryptophan. And these boosters are naturally present in our brain, so they won't alter our natural balance if taken with care. So her book is telling us two things : 1) North Americans have poor diets, and what a good diet should look like and 2) the solution proposed by the pharmaceutical industry to bypass bad moods are far from excellent, and a good diet should do the trick along with the necessary "recovery" regimen of amino acids.

For each of the four charts of symptoms, Ross indicates a somewhat complex program. The book in general is written in a quite technical language, making it a complete but a little abstruse text. It will be hard for the first-comer in neurotransmitters' talk to get to understand fully what is the thing going on. Nonetheless, the steps she proposes us are quite easy to go through. The problem though with this text is that recommendations are entwined in the text, making it somewhat delicate, I felt, for someone with absolute no scientific knowledge to use this book. I felt this book was designed for educated people and couldn't really be called a "self-help" book in the broadest sense of the term since it demands of the reader a certain responsibility over his own self that some may lack. On the other hand, this book is so complete that I am assured someone could start his own clinic using this book as it is full of instructive insights into such a practice.

I personally attest that the programs do yield interesting results! I personally tried Saint-John's Wort and Tyrosine – both natural – and had quite good results with both to resolve some chart's 1 and 2 symptoms. I was quite curious to see what would be the effects and I was quite amazed to see how clean and effective their effects were, but somewhat surprisingly unnatural to me at first. Tyrosine was especially strong in "brightening" up my mood and giving me alertness: I was suspicious about such a strong effect on only one pill. But soon the effect felt natural for me, something you get used to and appreciate. In a word, I felt her understanding of the brain's chemicals functions targeted accurately the deficiencies and that the solution to them were precise."
 

Gaby

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I agree, it is a fabulous book indeed! The questionnaires can be found here: http://www.moodcure.com/

Here a few notes and scanned quotes that I took ;)

Julia Ross said:
Our natural production of serotonin may be inhibited by: chemicals in your food such as caffeine, alcohol or aspartame. If you're not eating protein and healthy fat. Stress. Genes. If there's not enough bright light (during the day) to signal your brain to make serotonin. Lack of exercise.

Increasing fat intake increases the availability of tryptophan in the brain.

Females produce less serotonin than males do.

Estrogen helps serotonin.

Low serotonin: depression, shame and guilt/low self-esteem, obsessive or controlling, angry feelings, fear or anxiety. Physical stuff: gut and heart problems, sleep problems, fibromyalgia and other pains, cravings for carbs, alcohol and drugs.

Marijuana is seeked to boost serotonin, but at the end it inhibits serotonin production.

300mg of 5HTP per day for a week (but some require more), if no improvement:

tryptophan, which is also a source of niacin and other enzymes.
Saint John's Wort which helps to to raise serotonin levels when the amino acids somehow do not. It can be combined with the 5HTP. It works when 5THp doesn't, mostly in people with sluggish thyroids.
Sam-e sometimes, specially if there are arthritis and liver problems, but it needs more time, at least a bottle to see if it helps.

Melatonin

5HTP best taken twice a day, specially if symptoms in the morning.
IF too sleepy after months or weeks, or headaches after taking it, then enough of 5THP. Same if symptoms return.

St. John doesn't need the assistance of thyroid hormone to raise serotonin levels.

St John, 300mg three times a day.

Sam-e400mg, 2 and 2 capsules.

Melatonin 1 to 6mg

Questionnaire:

3 Do you have a tendency to be negative, to see the glass as half-empty rather than half-full? Do you have dark pessimistic thoughts?
3 Are you often worried and anxious?
3 Do you have feelings of low self-esteem and lack confidence?
3 Do you easily get to feeling self-critical and guilty?
3 Do you have obsessive, repetitive, angry or useless thoughts that you just can't turn off-for instance, when you're trying to get to sleep?
3 Does your behavior often get a bit, or a lot, obsessive? Is it hard for you to make transitions, to be flexible? Are you a perfectionist, a neatnik, or a control freak? A computer, TV, or work addict?
3 Do you really dislike the dark weather or have a clear-cut fall/winter depression (SAD)?
2 Are you apt to be irritable, impatient, edgy, or angry?
Do you tend to be shy or fearful? Do you get nervous or panicky about heights, flying, enclosed spaces, public performance, spiders, snakes, bridges, crowds, leaving the house, or anything else?
2 Have you had anxiety attacks or panic attacks (your heart races, it's hard to breathe?)
2 Do you get PMS or menopausal moodiness (tears, anger, depression)?
3 Do you hate hot weather?
2 Are you a night owl, or do you often find it hard to get to sleep even though you want to?
2Do you wake up in the night, have restless or light sleep, or wake up too early in the morning?
3 Do you routinely like to have sweet or starchy snacks, wine, or marijuana in the afternoons, evenings, or in the middle of the night (but not earlier in the day)?
2 Do you find relief from any of the above symptoms through exercise?
3 Have you had fibromyalgia (unexplained muscle pain) or TMJ (pain, tension, and grinding associated with your jaw)?
2 Have you had suicidal thoughts or plans?

If you score more than 12....
 

Gaby

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The Mood Cure said:
Lack of motivation, sleeping to much, lack of capacity to focus. Lack of catecholamins (dopamine, noradrenaline y adrenaline) and thyroid problems.

They use caffeine, chocolate to boost and tobacco and alcohol and marijuana are boosters as well.

Tyrosine

Start with 1 capsule of 500mg, in 30' if nothing happens, start take a second capsule, if in 30' nothing, take a third. Most people need only 2, but they need it two to three times a day: early in the morning, midmorning, and midafternoon. If you are a poor sleeper, take at midafternoon no more than 1-2 capsules.

For those who don't respond to tyrosine alone...

Phenylalanine start with 500mg capsule and increase as needed, stop taking if it also causes discomfort.

Other useful supplements: omega 3s, vitamin D which directs the conversion of tyrosine to cats in both your brain and your adrenal glands through calcium.

Pycnogenol and OPCs, these pine bark or grape seed extracts encourage cat activity in the brain, 100mg twice daily if tyrosine and phenylalanine doesn't work. SAM-e, for those who have used stimulant drugs. 800 to 1600mg per day, if the others don't work in 2 weeks.

Thyroid hormones are critical to the digestive breakdown and absorption of all amino acids, including tyrosine.

Tonsillectomy can start hypothyroid problems because tonsils are close to it.

Tyrosine is thyroid food, but it requires B12 which is made in the gut but under-produced when digestion enhancing thyroid levels are low. Also needed are iron, selenium, zinc, folic acid, other B vitamins.

Goitrogens: gluten, soy, cruciferous veggies (which also contain indoles, dithiolthiones and other chemicals that activate enzymes that destroy carcinogens), millet.

Cortisol is required for converting T4 to T3 so if it's not available because your adrenal glands have become too depleted to produce it, your thyroid function also suffers.

Fluoride and chlorine interfere with the thyroid. Both chemicals can be mistaken for thyroid-vital iodine (the 3 are chemically similar) and, therefore, displace iodine in your thyroid. Harmful hydrocarbons in unfiltered water have also shown to suppress the thyroid.

Estrogen and lithium (normal dose) also inhibits the thyroid. Sulfa drugs and anti-diabetic drugs also slow down the thyroid.

Some natural solutions: homeopathic thyroid products which contain potent though submicroscopic amounts of animal thyroid tissue. (sarcodes). By Dolisos. Glandular over the counter by GF thyroid by systemic formulas for example, thyroid by nutri-pak or TG 100 by allergy research.

Cut back l-tyrosine if unusual symptoms. L-phenylalanine 200-500mg 1 to 4 between meals three times a day, only up to 3 after midday.
SAM-e 400mg 2 and 2 between meals.

Grape seed extract 100mg, twice a day with meals.

Questionnaire:

3 Do you often feel depressed-the flat, bored, apathetic kind?
2 Are you low on physical or mental energy? Do you feel tired a lot, have to push yourself to exercise?
2 Is your drive, enthusiasm, and motivation quota on the low side?
3 Do you have difficulty focusing or concentrating?
3 Do you need a lot of sleep? Are you slow to wake up in the morning?
3 Are you easily chilled? Do you have cold hands and feet?
2 Do you tend to put on weight too easily?
3 Do you feel the need to get more alert and motivated by consuming a lot of coffee or other “uppers” like sugar, diet soda, ephedra, or cocaine?

If you score more than 6...
 

Gaby

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Julia Ross said:
Adrenal overload, all stressed out

Questionnaire:

3 do you often feel overworked, pressured, or deadlined?
1 Do you have trouble relaxing or loosening up?
1 Does your body tend to be stiff, uptight, tense?
2Are you easily upset, frustrated, or snappy under stress?
3 Do you often feel overwhelmed or as though you just can't get it all done?
2 Do you feel weak or shaky at times?
3 Are you sensitive to bright light, noise, or chemical fumes? Do you need to wear dark glasses a lot?
3 Do you feel significantly worse if you skip meals or go too long without eating?
2 Do you use tobacco, alchohol, food, or drugs to relax and calm down?

If you score more than 8....

Human tears, unlike the tears of any other animal, contain a substance called ACTH, the hormone that actually sets off the stress response and is literally washed way by a good cry.

Progesterone controls the release of the most relaxing chemical in the brain: GABA. Stress can redirect the hormone-producing adrenal glands. Instead of progesterone, they're busy overproducing stress response hormones like adrenaline and cortisol.

[Lots of symptoms of candida overgrowth mimic adrenal fatigue, perhaps because the adrenals are stressed with the infection]

Soy is not only a common allergen, it is also known to interfere with the production of stress-coping hormones in the adrenals.

We usually recommend GABA 100mg one to three times a day, but you might need 500mg.

Taurine is a soothing nutrient and it can turn off seizures.

Glycine is another one, helps relax muscles, and for some people it an be more relaxing than GABA.

Calmes Forte, homeopathic remedy. 1-2 capsules as needed.

The ones of serotonin can reduce stress.

After GABA, serotonin is your brain's most important anxiety buffer, and too much stress can use up both your serotonin and GABA stores.

Pyroluria: inborn error in metabolism that causes them to convert vitamin B6 and mineral zinc into unusable compounds. B6 and zinc creates serotonin and other NT, so pyrolurics are prone to chronic inner tension as well as intolerance to outer stress and other unique symptoms, like knees that crack and a tendency to sunburn and stretch marks.

Tyrosine and phenylalanine if symptoms of that.

In PTSD, a combination of GABA, 5 HTP, tyrosine raise depleted brain chemicals, reduce excess stimulation, and restore energy.

To stop excessive sweet starches cravings: Glutamine 500-1500mg early morning, midmorning, and midafternoon and at bedtime.
Chromium 200mcg three times a day.
 

Gaby

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Julia Ross said:
Are you too sensitive to life's pain?

3 Do you consider yourself or do thers consider you to be very sensitive? Does emotional pain or perhaps physical pain really get to you?
2 Do you tear up or cry easily-for instance, even during TV commercials?
2 Do you tend to avoid dealing with painful issues?
3 Do you find it hard to get over losses or get through grieving?
2 Have you been through a great deal of physical or emotional pain?
3 Do you crave pleasure, comfort, reward, enjoyment, or numbing from treats like chocolate, bread, wine, romance, novels, marijuana, tobacco, or lattes?

If you score more than 6...

Endorphins levels are low.

Estrogen rules the release of endorphin, as well as serotonin, in the brain. If estrogen or DHEA is low, taking estrogen or DHEA supplements can raise endorphin levels substantially, among other benefits.

Supplement: a combination of the D and L forms of the amino acid phenylalanine. Synergistic in the pain prevention department. The L one, helps amplify pleasure indirectly by increasing catecholamines and it forms PEA (phenylethylamine) found in chocolate which is energizing and related to euphoria.

Low endorphin is associated with pain, low PEA with depression, and LPA (the L one) increase both. The D one, DPA is a potent endorphin booster. It neutralizes enzymes (endorphinase and enkephalinase) in the brain that destroy endorphins.

DLPA is an exc anti-depressant.

If DLPA is wiring or sleepless inducing, then DPA. If you have sleep problems at night but need energy in the morning, 1 or 2 DLPA capsules first thing in the morning and in the midmorning. If they need endorphin boost in the afternoon, for example if they are 3pm chocolate nibblers, then DPA at that time. Rarely DPA can convert into LPA and PEA, so can also be energizing in the afternoon, usually it is well tolerated though.

A supplement blend of the essential amino acids: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, valine (make sure it has all of them, if it doesn't have tryptophan, you have to take 5HTP). In addition to DLPA and protein rich meals and snacks, can help your endorphin building off to a strong start.

5HTP can also increase endorphins, it takes a month though.

More than half of our low-endorphin clients also show clear signs of being low in serotonin and respond beautifully to the combination of DLPA in the morning and midmorning and 5HTP or tryptophan in the afternoon and evening.

B vitamins help restore endorphin function regenerate damaged nerves. Mg neutralizes most pain-provoking chemicals. Migraine and PMS respond to mg

Vit D and calcium can stop the pain from osteoporosis, PMS, and bone cancer, since the pain of these condiions is caused by a calcium and vitamin D deficiency.

Vit C also affects endorphin levels.

Omega 3s block inflammatory pain directly. Promote production and protection of all mood-enhancing brain chemicals, including endorphin. So do vitamins D, E, B complex and zinc.

DPA 500mg if you need to avoid more stimulating DLPA 1 three times a day with meals.

Freeform amino acid blend 700-800mg 1-2 with breakfast and then at midday.
 

Gaby

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notes from the Mood Cure said:
Omega 6 interference with dopamine can lead to Parkinson's disease, bipolar moods (manic depression), schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Soy can impair protein absorption, increases estrogen and messes up with your thyroid. As anticancer, we have to keep in mind that in Japan the average amount consumed is less than 2 teaspoons, even less in China. Soy can cause premature brain aging, like Alzheimer's.

Low calorie diets inhibits serotonin and thyroid hormone.

Aspartame inhibits serotonin and can be highly addictive as it forces a rise in our natural stimulants.

Caffeine inhibit serotonin and melatonin. It also depletes B vitamins, C, K, Ca, Zinc. It overstimulates and weakens the kidneys, pancreas, liver, stomach, intestines, heart, nervous system, and adrenal glands and overacidifes the pH causing premature aging.

MSG triggers depression.

Milk protein called “casein” can be addictive as gluten, the grain protein.

Omega 3s slow down the MAO enzymes that destroy dopamine and serotonin, so it is a MAO inhibitor. These fats can even be overstimulating to some people. If you find yourself waking up bright and early at 4am after too much omega 3 rich fish or fish oil supplementation, you'll have to cut back a bit. Alzheimer's and schizophrenia are clearly affected by altered fatty acid function, and omega 3 fat may help.

Flax oil is helpful in the brain only for 1/3 of us, at best. The rest of us can't convert its ALA omega-3 fat into DHA and EPA.

Saturated fats are complete in their molecular structure, unlike omega 6s, this density gives SATs their undisputed stability and strength. It's also why they don't get easily get rancid, something no one disputes. There was no association between intake of saturated fat and the risk of coronary death. SAT are the preferred energy source for your heart because they burn at such a reliable pac,e much steadier and longer than carbs do. SATs are not our problem, the high omega 6s -margarine and vegetable oils- are. You can safely cook with SATs, because at a heat that would toxify any vegetable oil, the sturdy SATs hold up. It will protect your brain and body, your skin from UV rays and will keep moisture in. Are good for energy as well. They slow the entry time of refined carbs, protecting you from diabetes. They keep your blood sugar levels rock solid, which keeps your mood solid, too. It allows for absorption of A, D, E, K vitamins and calcium. For example, spinach has lots of calcium, which is not absorbed well unless it's eaten with butter (or olive oil, which also contains some sat). Same principle with collard greens and bacon fat. Butter has ten vitamins, ten minerals, 18 amino acids, and 11 kinds of fat.

Vitamin A regulates progesterone.

Butter's butyrate is the fastest burning of all fats, it is a fatty acid that is used extensively in your brain. It serves as a base for making GABA. It can protect you from colon cancer.

A forty-year study of four thousand people in Hawaii found that “the earlier that patients start to have lower cholesterol concentrations, the greater the risk of death. Cholesterol is essential for serotonin production. 25% of our brains are cholesterol. Cholesterol is an antioxidant that protects our tissues, including the brain, and is the base from which we make all the stress and sex hormones that direct our brain's whole mood show. Cholesterol is not a fat, it is an alcohol that can be made from many foods. Cows can make it from grass. Low cholesterol is firmly associated with depression, anxiety, irritability, violence, suicide, and insomnia.

Coconut milk is a saturated fat. Coconut fat is antiviral and anti-fungal fat and it is a bit more stable than butter, and a little bit more saturated. (rancidity resistant).

Omega-9 fats are the final good-mood fats. Olive oil. As stable as saturated fats. It has a little saturated fat and almost no omega 6s, so it doesn't get rancid easily. Omega 9s are very supportive of the omega 3s and they help promote serotonin antidepressant activities in your brain. Cashews and macadamia.

People who don't like vegetables are zinc deficient. Our immune, thyroid, reproductive, and neurotransmitter systems, all depend on zinc.

Folic acid deficiency in depression and schizophrenia.

Spinach is rich in mg and B vitamins, but it needs to be cooked in order to eliminate phytates (chemicals that block iron, calcium, and other minerals from being used in our bodies)

Fruits are rich in B6. Bananas contain potassium and some serotonin and lots of melatonin.

All foods except fruits and veggies acidify your body. These two foods alkalinize. Even citrus foods becomes alkaline in the digestive process.

Beans have lectins, just as grains do. Beans are allergy-provoking.

Vit D at least 2000 IU per day. But excessive levels of vitamin D can be toxic, so do not exceed 400 IU daily without testing for your levels first.

Fish oil, if you go over your own ideal dose, you may get too energized and even have trouble sleeping.

Up to 80% of Americans cannot convert flax oil to DHA/EPA, and there is reason to fear its association, confirmed by several studies, with prostate cancer (while fish oil is associated with lowered incidences of this cancer).

If you take more than 1,800mg of DHA/EPA a day, you'll need to take 1 mg (1,000mcg) of vitamin K to counteract blood-thinning effects. Vit K in leafy greens and seaweed.

Blood type A, deficient in hydrochloric acid, which diminishes the ability to absorb minerals and protein (and to burn up hostile invaders like germs and parasites). 1 to 8 capsules of HCL (648mg) along with multi-enzymes and meals. Start with one and go up until you feel a mild acidic burning, then go down one capsule lower.

Before taking any amino acids, consult if you have a serious illness, including high or low blood pressure, lupus, migraine, liver impairment, severe kidney damage,an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, an overactive thyroid, or ulcers, are pregnant, nursing, taking methadone, or taking any medications, especially antidepressants or MAO inhibitors, or have severe mental or emotional problems, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

If you have manic depression (bipolar disorder) do not use L-glutamine, L-tyrosine, SAM-e, or Saint John's wort, high doses of fish or flax oil, or chromium without consulting.

If you have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, you might have an adverse (jittery, headachy) reaction to L-tyrosine, L-phenylalanine, or DL-phenylallanine. If so, stop them.

If you have hyperthyroidism, do not use L-tyrosine, L-phenylalanine, or DL-phenylalanine without medical advice.

If you have PKU, do not use DL or L phenylallanine.

If you get migraine headaches, they may be triggered by L-tyrosine, DL-phenylalanine, or L-phenylalanine.

If you have melanoma, do not use L-tyrosine or D or L phenylalanine.

If you have low blood pressure, avoid GABA, taurine, or niacin, or use low doses.

If you have high blood pressure, ask your doctor about using low or moderate (500- 1000mg) L-tyrosine, DL or L-phenylalanine. Avoid licorice.

Most amino supplements come in L-form, identical to the ones found in food. The only D-form recommended is D-phenylalanine.

From supplements, you could get a headache, nausea, loose bowels, or worsening of a negative symptom that you already had, like sleeplessness or jitterness.

Re the amino acids: if you take too much of any amino, you might get the very symptoms you're trying to alleviate. That's why I suggest you start with the lowest dose available and build up as necessary. For example, a stressed nurse took 500mg GABA instead of 100mg, she got much stressed for a few hours. On 100mg, she felt relaxed.

Stomachache – HCI, B complex
Headaches- L-tyrosine, DLPA, L-phenylalanine, L-tryptophan, 5 HTP, DHEA
Diarrhea-Mg, vit c
Nausea-B complex, 5HTP, L-tryptophan.
Burping-fish oil (take lipaise to aid fat digestion)
Light sensitivity-Saint Jonh's wort
Sunburn-St Jonh wort
High blood pressure-licorice
Jitteriness-L phenylalanine, L tyrosine, licorice, thyroid or adrenal supplements
Acne, oily skin DHEA

Try 300mg capsule of milk thistle twice a day to assist with any trouble your liver may be having processing the supplements.

Directions for eliminating supplements

At some point after you have corrected your imbalances and your symptoms are gone, you can begin to experiment very carefully with going off your special repair supplements, one at a time. If your original mood or other adverse symptoms come back (in a day or a week, or longer), you'll know that you still need to take that particular supplement for a while. Eliminate it again in a month and see what happens. Continue to do this until you no longer need any of your special supplements, but be ready to take them again during stressful times. Continue with your basic supplements. After 6 months, experiment with varying your multi once or twice a year by trying a new one when your old multi runs out, to get a different ratio of nutrients.

The symptoms caused by having serotonin levels raised too high can often be similar to those caused by having levels that are too low. Most severe symptoms: intense perspiration, fever, rapid heart beat, very low blood pressure, extreme fatigue... Also euphoria, drowsiness, sustain rapid eye movement, overreaction of the reflexes, rapid muscle contraction and relaxation in the ankle causing abnormal movement of the foot, clumsiness, restlessness, feeling drunk and dizzy, muscle contraction and relaxation in the jaw... intoxication, muscle twitching, rigidity, high body temperature, mental status changes... including confusion and hypo-mania, shivering, diarrhea, loss of consciousness.
 

Gaby

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notes from the Mood Cure said:
Serotonin molecules transformed into melatonin, which puts into sleep and into:

5 HIAA (5 hydroxyindole acetic acid)- which protect us from some of the most destructive of all negative moods, the ones that lead to violent crime, suicides, severe insomnia, and addiction.

That is why SSRIs have precisely those side effects, because they use the little of serotonin available and it can't be allowed to be transformed into melatonin and 5HIAA.

Most depressed and obsessive people are low in both serotonin and 5HIAA.

5HTP and tryptophan both raises 5 HIAA levels. B vitamin folic acid, and a lower-carb, high protein diet will also raise it.

Anything that raises serotonin, can potentially lower catecholamines.

If either 5HTP nor tryptophan works, your thyroid probably isn't producing enough of its hormones to allow you to digest or utilize 5HTP or trytophan. Up to 86% of depressed people have some kind of thyroid malfunction.

Saint John's wort can effectively raise serotonin levels without depleting 5 HIAA levels.

Get bright light for during the day(150-200 watts or 2,500 lux within three feet of you) if you have winter depression.

Pharmacyconnecs.com for an appropriate antidepressant tapering procedure.

If you are in anti-depressants, start with 50-100 twice per day, by 5pm and bedtime, then taper off, then increase the 5THP to 300 per day, continue for several months and wind down.

Only while you sleep deeply can your immune system, your growth hormones, and other repair crews emerge to heal your body from day's ravages. Finally, you dream in the REM stage, which seems to be designed particularly for psychic repair.

Melatonin is produced out of serotonin by your pineal gland, a pea-sized structure embedded deep within your brain. The pineal gland, which consists of pigment cells similar to those found in your eyes, is light sensitive.

Most sleep-deprived people do very well with 50 to 150mg of 5HTP at bedtime. If it doesn't work 500 to 1500mg of tryptophan, which usually works better for them.

IF thyroid problems, 300 to 600mg of St Johns Wort (or a dropperful) at bedtime should do. 300Mg or another dropperful in the afternoon as well.

Melatonin is a super soporific, an a powerful immune system-promoting antioxidant, which partly explains why so much healing occurs during sleep (melatonin levels are low in breast cancer victims, for example).

Melatonin is typically a short-term repair tool. Stop after a week to be sure you still need it or to see whether you can use less. Caution, some depressed people become more depressed on melatonin.

Melatonin enemies:caffeine, alcohol, chocolate, aspirin, tylenol, antidepressants, B complex near bedtime (especially B12), being close to electrical appliances (like electric blankets)

Even though bright light at night can diminish your melatonin production, if you are around bright light early in the day, your melatonin levels will rise higher at night.

If excess stress is your problem, inciting the release of too much adrenaline and other overstimulating chemicals, you'll want to try GABA. Too much GABA can sometimes have a reverse effect and agitate you. (GABA can lower blood pressure). Start with 100mg and go up gradually.

Testing cortisol...
Most people have been exhausted by too much stress. Their cortisol levels in the morning, at noon, and in the late afternoon are on the low side. But their bedtime levels may still be surprisingly high. Even if they're in the normal range bedtime, if these levels seem to be higher than the levels earlier in the day, they may keep rising in the night and wake them up at some point. Then “phosphorylated serine” (Seriphos, not the same as phosphatidyl serine), taken before dinner (6 hours before bedtime) should get you to sleep. Take it again 6h before you would typically wake up in the night or early morning. Seriphos encourages your pituitary gland to stop sending the order for more cortisol. After a month you shouldn't need more. Do not take Seriphos for more than three months total. Take a break for at least a week after each month's use.

If your early morning cortisol levels are high, they can wake you up too early, but don't use seriphos until you find out why. Usually it is a chronic yeast or parasite infection, or bacterial.Sometimes though, you need a bedtime snack to keep your blood sugar from dropping in the night, triggering an inopportune cortisol release.

Adrenal exhausted by stress coping often make insufficient sex hormones, which can lead to sleep disturbance. This is typically a factor for women with menopausal and premenopausal sleep problems. Low levels of estrogen can result in low levels of serotonin.

Black cohosh stimulates estrogen, or natural micronized estrogen.

Low progesterone can prevent the GABA supplies in your brain from activating. This could happen if you are a male, or a female under 35. For example, a sudden drop in progesterone during the week before your period (when progesterone should be at its highest peak) can contribute to PMS insomnia. After prolonged stress, especially around the start of menopause, progesterone levels sometimes drop too low all the time.
Note: Raised melatonin can suppress ovulation and vice versa!

Both calcium and magnesium encourage serotonin production. If they have a reverse, stimulating effect (rare, but possible), stop taking them at bedtime right away.

Restless legs may be keeping you awake, along with many pregnant women, many women over 65, and more men. Folic acid or iron deficiency anemia is typically the cause. Vit E 400 bid, for some people magnesium is the key.

Hypothyroidism can create sleep disturbances. It can interfere because there is not enough T3 in the brain that allow s the brain to produce serotonin and melatonin.

Sleep apnea. Serotonin directly affects the function of our lungs. Lots of oxygen is required for serotonin production. Overeating by low serotonin. Food allergies that cause stuffy nose, low thyroid conditions, low progesterone, high stress hormones.

A whole joint of marijuana could raise a man's melatonin levels 4,000% But artificial boosts can never get melatonin to stay at optimal levels, as the nutrients can. The drugs will reduce them further.

Questionnaire number one. Which substances make those symptom go away: sweets, starches, fatty foods (chips, milk, eggs), chocolate, alcohol, marijuana, tobacco, ecstasy, other.

Number two: sugar, chocolate, caffeine, aspartame, alcohol, cocaine, other uppers, marijuana, tobacco, other

Part 3: sweets, starches, chocolate, alcohol or tobacco, heroin, marijuana, other.

Part 4- sweets, starches, alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, painkillers, valium, etc.

Sweets, refined starches, and unhealthy fats can all have druglike effects on your brain that can contribute hugely to unstable moods and relapse.

More relapses caused by skipped meals than by any other single thing.

GABA and taurine specifically can protect against brain seizure, the greatest danger in withdrawal from drugs.

An impaired thyroid can prevent the aminos from working and sometimes even trigger anxiety and panic attacks. If stress, anxiety, and inner tension have long been part of your false mood picture, you may also have a genetic condition called pyroluria that blocks the absorption of key nutrients to the brain.

With amino acids and the basic vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids, the crash usually dissolves along with the cravings, typically on the first day.

Your Stimulant Recovery Protocol

1000 to 2000 mg L-tyrosine, three times per day, between meals, starting the minute you wake up.
Some people do better with a combination of 500-1000mg L-tyrosine and 500-1000mg L-phenylalanine. Increase omega 3s by at least 1 capsule with each meal beyond your basic dose. Add SAM-e, a brain chemical that is often depleted in stimulant addicts.

L-tyrosine 500 AM2-4 MM (midmorning) 2-4 MA 2-4
or
L-phenylalanine 400-500 AM 2-4, MM 2-4, MA 2-4
or combine the above
Omega 3 fish oil 300 DHA/EPA (1-2 in addition to your basic dose) B 3-4, L 3-4, D 3-4
SAM-e 200mg AM 6 MM 6
Milk thistle 300mg B 1, D 1.

Heroine and particularly methadone are the most difficult drugs to detox from of any encountered. The drug buprenorphine can be used successfully as a taper (through a detox doc).

Escaping painkillers (plus vitamin c, max doses, 5g every hour until you get diarrhea):
GABA 500mg (1 week only) AM 2 MM 2 MA 2 BT(bedtime) 2
DLPA 500mg AM 4 MM 4 MA 4 BT
If DLPA makes you at all tense or jittery, substitute D phenylalanine 500mg AM 2 MM2 MA 2 BT 1.
5 HTP 50mg AM 1-2 MM1-2, MA 2, BT 2-3
Freeform amino acid blend 700-800mg AM3 MM3. (to create endorphins and encephalins, for one month or longer).
Milk thistle

IV aminos has also good results.

At high enough doses, vitamin C (like DPA) can inactivate the enzyme that breaks down endorphin. Acupuncture is also famous for increasing endorphins and helping with opiate recovery especially after detox is over. (20% may be resistant to its effects).

If you are a driving type A but have low pain tolerance and possibly suicidal depressions, please rule out the possibility that you have overly high histamine levels by getting a blood histamine level test. (troubleshooting and rehab)

Over 95% of alcoholics are hypoglycemic. L-glutamine between meals. Chromium, zinc which is also required for a normal appetite.

SAM-e levels are low in many alcoholics. If you still feel depressed and crave alcohol after two weeks on nutritional rehab, try 800mg. Bid for one bottle.

Marijuana is not a natural plant now. It's been hybridized to a potency thousands of times greater than it had in the early 1960s, when it really was just a “weed”. The tendency for marijuana to store and build up in your brain means that if you've been a heavy marijuana smoker, it can take a year or more to get marijuana completely out of your system. Since marijuana concentrates in the cell walls all over the brain, it can affect any and all neurotransmitters. Use supplements, those that relate directly to the reason you smoke.

Sweeteners account for the majority of a cigarette's additives, others include arsenic and other poisonous chemicals. Alcohol and tranquilizers are dangerous detox (seizures).

Milk thistle is important in OH protocol, in all of them for that matter.

The tranquilizer protocol
100mg GABA with L-taurine and L-glycine (true calm by Now, or amino relaxers by country life)
AM1-4, MM1-4, MA 1-4, BT 1-4
GABA 500mg as needed MM1 MA 1 BT 1
5HTP 50mg or melatonin 3mg at BT 1-2 MA BT1-2
Milk thistle 300mg 1 B, D 1

The OH protocol
Glutamine 500mg AM 2-3, MM-2-3, MA 2-3 BT 2-3
Chromium 200mcg AM 1, MM1, MA 1, BT 1
Omega 3 500mg DHA/EPA (cut back if sleep is needed) B 2-3, L 2-3, D 2-3
Milk thistle
Zinc 50 B 1, D 1
SAM-e if above doesn't relieve depression B 800, L 800.

Pyroluria protocol

11% of general population. 40% of alcoholics. If you answer yes to 15 or more of the following questions, test the level of pyrroles in your urine with a kit from Bio Center Lab, 800-494 7785. Excess pyrroles use up zinc, vit B 6, and manganese. Measure your zinc using zinc tally or zinc status. If this diluted zinc containing liquid is held in your mouth for 10s and has no particular taste, your zinc levels are probably quite low. Hair analysis of manganese levels, or blood test for zinc.

Indentifying symptoms of pyroluria

When you were young, did you sunburn easily? Do you have fair or pale skin?
Do you have a reduced amount of head hair, eyebrows, or eyelashes, or do you have prematurely gray hair?
Do you have poor dream recall or nightmares?
Are you becoming more of a loner as you age? Do you avoid outside stress because it upsets your emotional balance?
Have you been anxious, fearful, or felt a lot of inner tension since childhood, but mostly hide these feelings from others?
Is it hard to clearly recall past events and people in your life?
Do you have bouts of depression and/or nervous exhaustion?
Do you have cluster headaches?
Are your eyes sensitive to sunlight?
Do you belong to an all-girl family or have look-alike sisters?
Do you get frequent colds or infections or unexplained chills or fevers?
Do you dislike eating protein? Have you ever been a vegetarian?
Did you reach puberty later than normal?
Are there white spots/flecks on your fingernails, or do you have opaquely white or paper-thin nails?
Are you prone to acne, eczema, or psoriasis?
Do you prefer the company of one or two close friends rather than a gathering of friends?
Do you have stretch marks on your skin?
Have you noticed a sweet smell (fruity odor) to your breath or seat when ill or stressed?
Do you have or did you have before braces-crowded upper front teeth?
Do you prefer not to eat breakfast or even experience light nausea in the morning?
Does your face sometimes look swollen while under a lot of stress?
Do you have a poor appetite or a poor sense of smell or taste?
Do you have any upper abdominal, splenic pain? As a child did you get a “stitch” in your side when you ran?
Do you tend to focus internally (on yourself) rather than on the external world?
Do you frequently experience fatigue=
Do you feel uncomfortable with strangers?
Do your knees crack or ache?
Do you overreact to tranquilizers, barbiturates, alcohol, or other drugs-that is, does a little produce a powerful response?
Does it bother you to be seated in a restaurant in the middle of the room?
Are you anemic?
Do you have cold hands and/or feet?
Are you easy upset (internally) by criticism?
Do you have a tendency toward morning constipation?
Do you have tingling sensations or muscle spams in your legs or arms?
Do changes in your routine (traveling, new situations) provoke stress?
Do you tend to become dependent on one person whom you build your life around?
Are there severe mood problems, mental illness, or alcoholism in your family?

By Carl Pfeiffer, Ph.D.,

protocol in Joan mathews-Larslon PHD, Depression Free Naturally

Thyroiditis for too much iodized salt? Incidence is on the rise in populations with iodized salt.

If your adrenals test low, start revving them up even before you start your thyroid medication, if possible. Sometimes correcting adrenal function takes care of the thyroid as well.

Armour Thyroid, porcine thyroid is too stimulating for some, because pig's thyroids produce quite a bit more of the active hormone T3 than human thyroids do, in relation to T4.

If you are allergic, be aware that some synthetic T4 products also contain acacia and/or lactose.

Synthetic T3, cytomel.

Suspect thyroiditis (Hashimoto) when person is nervous, tense depression; trouble swallowing pills; feels “wired”, especially after ingesting caffeine or the amino acid L-tyrosine; and has other mood and sleep issues that don't resolve quickly on our nutrient supplements and good-mood foods. It always require adrenal testing. Treating adrenal exhaustion with cortisol has entirely treated the problem. Viral and allergic reactions may be triggers. Wheat, rye, etc.Soy too. Treatment with T4 and then cytomel, as needed. Test for anemia, because its common. B12, folic acid, iron...Make sure to take selenium and zinc.

If you have parasites, you'll typically have to kill them first before you can get to the yeasts.

You may need a bedtime snack if your blood sugar is dropping at night and triggering a bedtime cortisol surge that keeps you awake. Or you may need to use phosphorylated serine (seriphos) which is a combination of phosphorous and calcium with the amino acid serine. It reduces ACTH (pituitary) messages that order your adrenals to release emergency amounts of cortisol. Pregnant and lactating women can't use it.

If cortisol is high in the morning, test for parasites, which tend to become more active at night, stimulating the adrenals to kick up your cortisol levels just when the should be dropping at the end of the day. Don't use seriphos, you'll need cortisol to get rid of parasites.

Get rid of parasites and yeast then.

Homeopathic remedies for glandular problems are called sarcodes.

Licorice one to two times a day, right before your drop of blood pressure, do not take after 3pm, your sleep may be affected. Use it for 1 to 3 months. Stop if any symptoms. Licorice raises blood pressure and estrogen.

Pregnenolone is used by adrenals to convert to over 30 hormones, cortisol, progesterone and DHEA. Seems to work best for men and menopausal women. Don't use it if your progesterone or estrogen is too high or if you are hyperthyroid.

Do not take DHEA without first testing your levels. If you have hormonally linked illness, test hormones first. Retest every 3 to 6 months.

Prescription cortisol, to keep cortisol output at 23 to 40mg per ml. If someone tested 8, he is given 20mg, if high demands like in flu, then 40mg.of Cortef (hydrocortisone) Dr. Jeffries suggests microdoses of 2.5 to 5mg of cortef, two to four times per day. Side effects of cortef are seen typically with 50mg to 150mg or more per day. Good for fibromyalgia.

Progesterone promotes calmness, relaxation, healthy fetal development, and a normal ovulation pattern. Low progesterone can be a factor in infertility, anxiety, and PMS, while too much progesterone can lead to lethargy, weight gain, and depression, as women on synthetic progesterone often find.

DHEA is the primary source material for estrogen and testosterone. DHEA can alleviate depression and senile dementia by protecting important brain neurons. But too much DHEA can trigger symptoms of too much testosterone or estrogen.

5 HTP can improve PMS symptoms, adding on those days help. PMS moods can also erupt after a sudden drop in progesterone levels or with inadequate overall estrogen levels.

Postpartum depression, 80%. Omega 3s, 5HTP if you're not nursing,test hormone imbalances.

Menopause, proper testing is essential.

Male hormonal cycles. Imbalance from too much carbs, caffeine, OH. Too much stress which wears down the adrenals.

High cortisol, low estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and DHEA can all contribute to bone loss and CV disease or insomnia.

Saliva tests reveal the levels of free, unbound hormones in the system, those directly available to cells in your body.

Thyroid malfunctions are associated with many symptoms of sex hormone imbalance, from premature (before 12) or late (after 13) menstruation, to heavy menstrual bleeding, to infertility, to postpartum depression, to menopausal weight gain. Correcting thyroid function can sometime correct sex hormone imbalances.

Too much stress can cause adrenal malfunction, exhausting your adrenal and leading to sex hormone and mood imbalances, particularly after 35.In perimenopause and menopause, your adrenals take over your ovaries and testes when they stop producing hormones. Dealing with stress is a priority.

It's important for men over 40 to test for low progesterone levels too, especially if stress and insomnia are problems, as well as for DHT, LH, FSH, free PSA, and sex-hormone-binding globulin to assess prostrate health.

Taking the birth control pill can add to or create a hormonal imbalance- even years after going off the pill.

Herbs for PMS, angelica and dong quai, blue cohosh and sarsaparrilla. Herbs for menopause, dong quai, black cohosh, maca.

ALWAYS TEST!

Note: gels and creams, bypass the liver so they're better, they can affect bedmates. Apply in the morning after rising.

Avoid syntethic methyltestosterone, which is very hard on the liver.

For excess hormones: stop taking them, take at least 5 g of vitamin C per day, increase pure water to wash out excess hormones, use gentle fiber like citrus pectin daily (mix it with plenty of water, be sure to eat fiber foods like fruit, beans, crunchy veggies, seeds and whole grains), saw palmetto may reduce testosterone levels.

I notice that some of this might not be clear as they are notes taken here and there, but FWIW.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
This is more like a scanned quote, so it makes more sense:

Julia Ross said:
If your pleasure chemistry is deficient, there really is a simple and direct way to build it up in a single day. The winning formula? Twin amino acids, backed up by high-protein foods three times a day and a few other nutritional armaments. ... The twin formula is DLPA, a combination of the D- and L-forms of the amino acid phenylalanine. ...

L-phenylalanine (LPA) is one of the 15 or more base aminos needed to form endorphin and one of the 5 needed to form enkephalin- one of the most powerful of the painkilling subgroups in the endorphin family. This remarkable amino directly raises energy and decreases depression by increasing the brain's stimulating neurotransmitters, the catecholamines. Additionally, it forms PEA (phenylethylamine), another energizing brain chemical (also found in chocolate) that may be the chemical most responsible for feelings of euphoria. Just as low endorphin is associated with pain, low PEA is routinely associated with depression, and LPA helps increase both.

The second component of the twin formula DLPA is D-phenylalanine (DPA). DPA is the mirror image of LPA, but it's a much more potent endorphin booster. DPA is a rare substance known to effectively and safely neutralize the enzymes in the brain that destroy endorphins. Each of your brain's four mood enhancers has an enzyme nemesis that destroys it, regardless of how desperately you might still need it. This natural process is designed to prevent an excess of endorphin production, but you need protection against it when the problem is deficiency, not excess. In the case of your endorphins, it's enzymes called endorphinase and enkephalinase that you're up against, and their terminator is DPA. DPA quickly disarms these enzymes, thus protecting your supply of endorphin and allowing it to build and expand.

In one study reported in the richly researched book DLPA, endorphin levels tripled ninety minutes after one dose of DPA was taken and stayed that high for six days! Author Arnold Fox, M.D., past president of the American Academy of Pain Management, has been using DPA and DLPA in his clinical practice for over twenty years, and he's even more enthusiastic now about their benefits than he was when he published his best-selling book on the subject in 1985.

Many studies have confirmed that DPA and LPA even significantly relieve the physical pain of arthritis, migraines, and cancer. In one study, ten chronic pain patients were given both aminos for 3 to 7 days. Good to excellent results were noted in every case. In a French study, nine patients in severe pain from a variety of causes were given low levels of DPA only, for twenty months. Seven never needed any other pain reliever ever again.

Studies confirm that some forms of depression respond very well to DLPA-better, in fact, than to some antidepressant drugs.

If you have sleep problems at night but need energy in the morning, you'll probably be fine taking 1 or 2 DLPA capsules first thing in the morning and in the mid-morning, but you shouldn't take DLPA in the afternoon, certainly not after three P.M. If you need an endorphin boost in the afternoon you could take DPA.
 

ScarletBegonias

Dagobah Resident
Thank you for this post, chachazoom!

I would like to update this thread, because I read this exceptional book a couple months ago and tried out some of the suggestions. Currently I am taking St John's Wort, 5-HTP and GABA and also using a full spectrum light, which was recommended in the book. I tend to get a little down during the winter months when there is less sunlight, but I think the full-spectrum light has been helping to prevent that. This is actually the best winter I've had in a very long time and I feel great!

The main reason I'm writing is because I would also like to also note that I tried L-Tyrosine (another recommendation from the book), but immediately began getting a lot of acne on my face and upper back, so I stopped. My friend also tried L-Tyrosine and it exacerbated his heart problems, so he stopped too. Just posting our reactions to this amino acid, FWIW.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
pyroluria

notes from the Mood Cure said:
Pyroluria protocol

11% of general population. 40% of alcoholics. If you answer yes to 15 or more of the following questions, test the level of pyrroles in your urine with a kit from Bio Center Lab, 800-494 7785. Excess pyrroles use up zinc, vit B 6, and manganese. Measure your zinc using zinc tally or zinc status. If this diluted zinc containing liquid is held in your mouth for 10s and has no particular taste, your zinc levels are probably quite low. Hair analysis of manganese levels, or blood test for zinc.

Indentifying symptoms of pyroluria

When you were young, did you sunburn easily? Do you have fair or pale skin?
Do you have a reduced amount of head hair, eyebrows, or eyelashes, or do you have prematurely gray hair?
Do you have poor dream recall or nightmares?
Are you becoming more of a loner as you age? Do you avoid outside stress because it upsets your emotional balance?
Have you been anxious, fearful, or felt a lot of inner tension since childhood, but mostly hide these feelings from others?
Is it hard to clearly recall past events and people in your life?
Do you have bouts of depression and/or nervous exhaustion?
Do you have cluster headaches?
Are your eyes sensitive to sunlight?
Do you belong to an all-girl family or have look-alike sisters?
Do you get frequent colds or infections or unexplained chills or fevers?
Do you dislike eating protein? Have you ever been a vegetarian?
Did you reach puberty later than normal?
Are there white spots/flecks on your fingernails, or do you have opaquely white or paper-thin nails?
Are you prone to acne, eczema, or psoriasis?
Do you prefer the company of one or two close friends rather than a gathering of friends?
Do you have stretch marks on your skin?
Have you noticed a sweet smell (fruity odor) to your breath or seat when ill or stressed?
Do you have or did you have before braces-crowded upper front teeth?
Do you prefer not to eat breakfast or even experience light nausea in the morning?
Does your face sometimes look swollen while under a lot of stress?
Do you have a poor appetite or a poor sense of smell or taste?
Do you have any upper abdominal, splenic pain? As a child did you get a “stitch” in your side when you ran?
Do you tend to focus internally (on yourself) rather than on the external world?
Do you frequently experience fatigue=
Do you feel uncomfortable with strangers?
Do your knees crack or ache?
Do you overreact to tranquilizers, barbiturates, alcohol, or other drugs-that is, does a little produce a powerful response?
Does it bother you to be seated in a restaurant in the middle of the room?
Are you anemic?
Do you have cold hands and/or feet?
Are you easy upset (internally) by criticism?
Do you have a tendency toward morning constipation?
Do you have tingling sensations or muscle spams in your legs or arms?
Do changes in your routine (traveling, new situations) provoke stress?
Do you tend to become dependent on one person whom you build your life around?
Are there severe mood problems, mental illness, or alcoholism in your family?

The B6 and Hb discussions on the Hemochromatosis thread, and the fact that an article was just written about it reminded me of pyroluria:

_http://www.metabolichealing.com/key-integrated-functions-of-your-body/mthfr-genetics-and-methylation/pyroluria-biochemical-effects-neurological-implications/

Pyroluria is a condition that has been known for several decades. It is sometimes referred to as mauve factor, KPU, kryptopyroluria and Hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2-one, or HPL. Besides acting as a tongue twister, this condition is potentially very serious, and may have numerous biochemical implications.

Pyroles are synthesized during hemoglobin production in the body. They can be thought of as a byproduct of hemoglobin, when hemoglobin is synthesized in the spleen. While it is normal for some pyroles to be produced as a hemoglobin byproduct, certain individuals tend to produce an excess.

Pyroluria was initially identified by Abram Hoffer, MD, PhD as one potential cause of schizophrenia. In the early days of diagnosing pyroluria, it was originally thought that kryptopyrroles were synonymous with pyroluria. Improved technology in 1976 identified that the substance being excreted in high amounts through the urine of certain patients was actually Hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2-one. Nonetheless, what has been clinically observed over the years has revealed a very interesting discussion regarding the implications of high levels of pyrrole production and excretion.

Biochemical Implications

Pyroles have an affinity for binding to and causing a high depletion of 2 critical nutrients:

Vitamin B-6
Zinc


Vitamin B-6

In the instance of an increasing production or pyroles, the pyroles have an affinity for binding to aldehydes such as B-6.

Vitamin B-6 is critical for several biological and metabolic functions:

Neurotransmitter synthesis
Gene expression
Synthesis of hemoglobin
Histamine production
Metabolism of amino acids, lipids and glucose
Methylation status


The functions of the brain and nervous system are chemically dependent upon B-6 status. Vitamin B-6 plays a critical role in the synthesis of 5 essential neurotransmitters: norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine, GABA.

B-6 deficiency may alter the expression of genes. This may be due to the essential role that B-6 plays in a biochemical pathway referred to as methylation, which greatly affects DNA and RNA activities.

Additionally, B-6 is critical for the synthesis of a class of lipids called sphingolipids. These lipids are critical for cell signal transduction, and neural health. Abnormal lipid values have been identified in individuals with elevated urine pyrroles. This may be especially true for an omega 6 lipid, arachadonic acid.

Zinc

In addition to causing a depletion of Vitamin B-6, increased pyrrole production will also tend to deplete zinc.

It may be easier to identify the roles that zinc doesn't play in the body, than the roles it does play. Zinc is an essential trace element that activates several hundred enzymatic reactions. These reactions are fundamental to life and biological activity. Some of the activities that zinc are involved in:

DNA & RNA synthesis
Gene expression
Nervous system function
Immune function & immune signaling such as cell apoptosis
Neuronal transmission
Brain function
Zinc possesses powerful anabolic activities in the cells
Formation of zinc proteins known as "zinc fingers"
Zinc is essential for blood clotting and platelet formation
Zinc is involved in Vitamin A synthesis
Folate is made available through zinc enzyme reactions
Along with copper, Zinc makes up the antioxidant enzyme system, ZnCu superoxide dismutase
Steroidal hormone synthesis
Growth & development of children
Testosterone and semen formation

In certain instances, if zinc is depleted, copper levels may elevate. This is due to the intrinsic relationship that exists between these two trace elements. The biochemical implications of copper toxicity are well established. Free, unbound copper ions may create a tremendous amount of havoc and toxicity for biological functions.

Pyroluria: Neurological, Behavioral Implications

A depletion of zinc and B-6 has direct implications on the function of the nervous system and brain. It is for this reason that pyrroluria is strongly associated with neurological conditions, bi-polar, down syndrome, ADHD, alcoholism, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, aphasia, involuntary muscle twitching and abnormal motor function.

{As it happens, these conditions are characterized by high iron load according to the Exposing Hidden Dangers of Iron book. It says that bipolar people who don't unload iron will not response to psychiatric therapy (whatever that may be).}

A 1990 study demonstrated elevations in urine pyrroles in 71% of individuals with down syndrome. Studies and research conducted by William Walsh, PhD identify the presence of pyroluria in large percentages of individuals with ADHD and schizophrenia.

It is apparent that most cases of pyroluria are familial. Although high levels of pyrroles may appear in response to increased levels of oxidative stress. For example, elevated urine pyrroles are often seen in chronic lyme disease. Lyme disease and its associated co-infections are well established to induce varying degrees of neurological inflammation and toxicity. Increased pyrroles are potentially another cog in the lyme wheel.

A mountain of clinical evidence supports the role of pyroluria in the etiology of varying types of neurological symptoms, as well as mental and behavioral health symptoms and conditions. Many clinicians report the resolution of symptoms with the simple treatment of B6 and zinc when elevated urine pyrroles present. It should be noted, however, that pyroluria may be a part of a larger clinical presentation, and as such, symptoms may not resolve as rapidly in some individuals.

Much of the current research on the effects of mauve factor (another name for pyroluria) on the biochemistry demonstrates the correlation between glutathione depletion and this condition. Additionally, this same research suggests a role of intestinal permeability in the development of mauve factor.

Curiously, antibiotic treatment has reported the ability to decrease urine pyrrole excretion, indicating a possible microbial role in the development of pyroluria.

It is clear that emerging research into this condition will open up greater discussion for the identification and treatment options for those with Hydroxyhemopyrrolin-2-one, also known as pyroluria.
 

Tomek

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Vitamin B6, serotonin, zinc, iron, what could be the link between all of this ? I qualify for most of the pyroluria symptoms, and most of my anxiety disorders went away when I started taken B6 and zinc supplements, but that's still "not quite it".
 

mb

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Tomek said:
Vitamin B6, serotonin, zinc, iron, what could be the link between all of this ? I qualify for most of the pyroluria symptoms, and most of my anxiety disorders went away when I started taken B6 and zinc supplements, but that's still "not quite it".

Pyroluria is also mentioned in Primal Body, Primal Mind, with the same lab reference. If in doubt, test, if you are able to find a lab where you live that has the test.

Primal Body said:
Testing for this condition is simple, relatively inexpensive, and readily accessible to anyone without a prescription. Call Bio-Center Laboratory in Wichita, Kansas (phone: 316-684-7784 or 1-800-494-7785) or go to its website for more information: www.biocenterlab.org.

Gedgaudas, Nora T. (2011-06-22). Primal Body, Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life (p. 326). Healing Arts Press. Kindle Edition.
 

Tomek

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Yeah, well, in France this condition is totally unknown and I spent a lot of time searching in test labs catalogues to see if they sell something that could be helpful in order to prove or disprove if I have pyroluria, like a urine pyrroles test : nada. I'll search for a european lab, at least. Shipping my urine to America might be a little expensive.
(I never believed that I will write "shipping my urine" someday)
 

Maat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I found this article in French :
_http://www.cinak.com/editions/articles_fre/hpu.pdf

which leads me to this in switzerland :
_http://cinak.com/home.php?id=contact

hope this helps
 
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