To those who can hear the "Hum"

Benjamin

Dagobah Resident
I've kept up with this thread, wondering if the low range hum I hear is just tinnitus. But I think that is pretty close to what I hear! I only hear it when things are quiet and usually my high range tinnitus takes the fore.

Yeah, the hum is not tinnitus. I have tinnitus- the high-pitched almost 'white noise' sound in the ears (which is stronger in the right ear on me)- and can hear the low rumbling 'hum' in the background. The two are separate.
 

Benjamin

Dagobah Resident
In the spirit of the attempt, here is my version of the hum that I hear.

I use Logic. There is a basic generator called a "Test Oscillator" and it generates a sine wave between 20Hz-20kHz.

Test Oscillator.png

I listened to the hum that I was hearing and pretty closely matched the frequency at 102 kHz. However, the 'rumble' was missing and so I theorised that the 102 kHz might be harmonic. So, I generated a second frequency at 51 kHz which generated the rumble. Then I noticed that there was a subtle 'bite' to the rumble and thought that there might be a third frequency involved and generated a wave that sounded like the best option at 78 kHz. I don't know if there is a third frequency involved in the actual hum, but I did it this way, instead of using a distortion filter, because it gave the right 'feel'. After mucking about with plugins and volumes, I came up with this. In my opinion, it's ok. Recreating something like this is really difficult.

Careful with the volume at the start. I don't think it's that loud but just in case, lower your volume before you listen.
 

Attachments

  • 51, 78 & 102 kHz frequencies sum (The Hum).mp3
    707.8 KB

BlueKiwi

Jedi Master
I listened to the hum that I was hearing and pretty closely matched the frequency at 102 kHz. However, the 'rumble' was missing and so I theorised that the 102 kHz might be harmonic. So, I generated a second frequency at 51 kHz which generated the rumble. Then I noticed that there was a subtle 'bite' to the rumble and thought that there might be a third frequency involved and generated a wave that sounded like the best option at 78 kHz. I don't know if there is a third frequency involved in the actual hum, but I did it this way, instead of using a distortion filter, because it gave the right 'feel'. After mucking about with plugins and volumes, I came up with this. In my opinion, it's ok. Recreating something like this is really difficult.
Awesome ! Very close to what I hear.

I'm trying to weigh up if the oscillation is just amplitude, or beat frequcies caused by other frequencies.

In my previous sample, I used three different, but close frequencies. The additive and subtractiveness of the frequencies caused the amplitude to waver. I had to be careful not to allow clipping when all three were adding to each other.

But now I'm thinking maybe it's just one frequency, with just a varying amplitude 🤔
 

Benjamin

Dagobah Resident
I listened to the hum that I was hearing and pretty closely matched the frequency at 102 kHz. However, the 'rumble' was missing and so I theorised that the 102 kHz might be harmonic. So, I generated a second frequency at 51 kHz which generated the rumble. Then I noticed that there was a subtle 'bite' to the rumble and thought that there might be a third frequency involved and generated a wave that sounded like the best option at 78 kHz.

Whoops. These should all be Hz.

I apologise to keep bringing this up but the whole time I was making that sound file, the hum was very strong so it was a bit easier to make. But towards the end of completion, the hum dissipated and after I uploaded, it disappeared. It's still completely gone. I don't know why it seems to follow a pattern. For about two weeks, I have not heard the hum or have only heard it at levels so low that it was barely noticeable. And then it pops up at strength as I'm recreating it? It doesn't make sense. Why should it do that? Is it telling me I should be doing something else? 🤷‍♂️ I'm at a loss.

I thought 'the hum' was in both ears, but it's not... or at least it is much, much stronger on the left.

I don't think it's an external sound that can be heard with the ears.

These links may have been posted before already but I might as well put them here.

Here is a 5:35 minute video on the hum. Interestingly, a recording was made in Taos, New Mexico of the hum at 00:50.


This is a long article about the hum. Not sure about the 'explained' part though.


Here is a website dedicated to the hum. There is a link to a map of the world which tracks where people hear it.

 

Wandering Star

The Living Force
Whoops. These should all be Hz.

I apologise to keep bringing this up but the whole time I was making that sound file, the hum was very strong so it was a bit easier to make. But towards the end of completion, the hum dissipated and after I uploaded, it disappeared. It's still completely gone. I don't know why it seems to follow a pattern. For about two weeks, I have not heard the hum or have only heard it at levels so low that it was barely noticeable. And then it pops up at strength as I'm recreating it? It doesn't make sense. Why should it do that? Is it telling me I should be doing something else? 🤷‍♂️ I'm at a loss.



I don't think it's an external sound that can be heard with the ears.

These links may have been posted before already but I might as well put them here.

Here is a 5:35 minute video on the hum. Interestingly, a recording was made in Taos, New Mexico of the hum at 00:50.


This is a long article about the hum. Not sure about the 'explained' part though.


Here is a website dedicated to the hum. There is a link to a map of the world which tracks where people hear it.

Well, definitely I have never heard this sound, after listening to the examples.

It calls my attention, that on the map of the places where it is heard, in England it is massive, and it is huge in the center of Europe.
 
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