Vitamin D Story

Gmork

The Force is Strong With This One
When i saw my vitamin D was low, i did take a 10,000 iu of vitamin D given by my doctor, i felt little/no difference, and, since then, i've tried it a few more times and had the same result.
I'm pretty sure it take time to restore D levels, its not 1 month, rather 3 or more. Unless of course you have really low level then you would notice change. 10,000 i.u its not a lot, from what i understand it is average dose to restore. If you have low levels you need to take 10k every day for some time. (or i misunderstand how much you take)

My question: do we really know or not know the exact mechanism of how Vitamin D works? As they said - road to hell is paved with good intentions.
We know what healthy person levels of D are, first time D was discovered was when people in UK had problems with bones etc and supplementation helped them so we know you can restore levels with supplementation and because of that we know what good levels are.
I don't see why you question this whole thread based on some book anecdote( I'm just trying to understand where you coming from, how much you know about vit D)
 

istina

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FOTCM Member
After taking a sunshine for several months during this year, and also taking an oral vitamin D for several months, I did a blood test for vitamin D. My results are: 26.5 nmol/l, which is quite low. Since kidneys have a role of converting vitamin D, perhaps I have a kidney problem? I do feel a slight pain in my kidney for a long time, which I never found out why. Oral vitamin D also gives me a low blood pressure. I tried taking vitamin D2 and it gave me a strong sharp pain in my kidneys.
I take vitamin D with vitamins K and magnesium. If I take more than 2000 IU of Vitamin D, I have symptoms of detox, brain fog etc. Also, I had problems with oxalates and kidney stones. When I feel something in my kidneys, I take extra magnesium citrate, and if it doesn't help I also take potassium citrate and / or chanca peidra, what I learned in the low oxalate group(TLO) on FB ( dumping down oxalates, which can cause stone formation). It always helps me.
 

itellsya

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We know what healthy person levels of D are, first time D was discovered was when people in UK had problems with bones etc and supplementation helped them so we know you can restore levels with supplementation and because of that we know what good levels are.
There's also stories of Vitamin D intoxication from those times too, it actually led to the addition of it in foods being banned in Europe. I suspect that these children would have benefited just as much from a better diet and so on, because post-war Britain, as one example, was still on rationing.
 
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Gmork

The Force is Strong With This One
There's also stories of Vitamin D intoxication from those times too, it actually led to the addition of it in foods being banned in Europe. I suspect that these children would have benefited just as much from a better diet and so on, because post-war Britain, as one example, was still on rationing.
Yes i also found information about that so far i found that it was because of crazy amount of Vit D3 as Dr. Heaney say in this:


He is also mentioning that VitD is needed to read DNA, and when you are not having enough body is capable of compensating, also that mother with that don't have serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the range of 40 to 60 nanograms per milliliter can have higher risk of having autistic child.
 
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itellsya

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Yes i also found information about that so far i found that it was because of crazy amount of Vit D3 as Dr. Heaney say in this:

He is also mentioning that VitD is needed to read DNA, and when you are not having enough body is capable of compensating, also that mother with that don't have serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the range of 40 to 60 nanograms per milliliter can have higher risk of having autistic child.
To be clear, i'm not denying the necessity of adequate levels of vitamin D to health, but some important questions are: How do we measure them? and what other factors play a role in our vitamin D levels?

For example:

[...]
let me borrow the Introduction from a wonderfully insightful, contemporary (2013) and brief (2 pgs), article by Armin Zittermann on this vital issue:
“Life depends on an energy-consuming complex interplay of organic and inorganic substances to maintain biological structures. Adequate energy and nutrient supply is a prerequisite to guarantee normal functioning of metabolic pathways and thus a healthy life. To become metabolically active, several nutrients require other essential nutrients as cofactors (emphasis added). For example, copper is required for the oxidation of absorbed Fe2+ to [become] Fe3+, which is then bound to transferrin; and riboflavin (vitamin B2) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6) are required to produce niacin (vitamin B3) from dietary tryptophan. Therefore, some nutrition-related illnesses, such as anemia and pellegra, can be caused by multiple nutrient deficits [1,2]. Magnesium (Mg) is a cofactor that is required for the binding of vitamin-D to its transport protein. Moreover, conversion of vitamin-D by hepatic 25-hydroxylation and renal 1a-hydroxylation into the active, hormonal form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (1,25(OH)2D) is Mg dependent [3,4].

[...]

Xinqing Deng, MD and his colleagues at Vanderbilt & Harvard have recently published an important article in BioMedCentral-Medicine: “Magnesium, Vitamin-D status and Mortality: results from the US NHANES 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III.” This is a study that warrants careful review and reflection.

Their conclusion is key to our objective for better understanding the metabolic origin of Vitamin-D deficiency: “Our preliminary findings indicate it is possible that Magnesium intake alone or its interaction with vitamin-D intake may contribute to vitamin-D status.”



And so, from the above, it would seem that simply supplementing with vitamin D alone may not solve vitamin D deficiencies.
 

jhonny

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Considering that this is one of the vitamin D threads, I thought this post (below) in another thread by @Keyhole would be interesting to share here. I think this to be relevant because, at least in my immediate environment, there are so many people tested (lab results) with low vit. D, and this could be an ongoing issue of chronic inflamation. Also, knowing that all (or at lest the majority) tests are just about the inactive form of the vitamin, i.e. 25-OH-D.

For vitamin D3, a level of 20ng/ml of 25-OH-D (inactive vitamin D) is probably because it is all being shunted towards the active form (1-25-OHD). I would bet that your active D levels in blood are probably very high, although they were not tested here.

Basically - inactive vitamin D (which is the one usually tested) floats around in the blood and needs to become activated to exert immune modulating effects. If someone has low inactive, it is because chronic inflammation is promoting the activation to its active form.

I would be cautious about using vitamin D in supplement form for cancer when your levels are that "low". The problem is not low vitamin D per se, but often times it is the vitamin D receptor function and utilization of vitamin D at the cell level which becomes problematic in cancer.

Taking exogenous supplemental vitamin D can block the receptor when someone is in a chronic inflammatory state. Here is a good paper which explains vitamin D deficiency as a CONSEQUENCE of disease, rather than a CAUSE: Inflammation and vitamin D
 
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