What is the mechanism of the prayer of the soul?

Kisito

Jedi Council Member
Hello, I want to know if a person know the physiological mechanism of the prayer of the soul?
Why certain words, syntax or repetitions (20 times) they would act on a better future?

That is also the invocation of probable positive vibes or opening the chakras, is it possible to know precisely the mechanism that generates this system? This seems to me magical. I don't recall session or something about it.
 

Alada

The Living Force
I don't think it would be helpful to think of it in 'magical' terms, as Laura mentioned in the recent session "You can use the Prayer of the Soul, or you can recite a poem. It almost doesn't matter since you're just exercising your focusing power." So you could recite 'Mary had a little lamb' o the same end.

I think it's more about training the mind to be quiet, focussed, a way to put the personality to sleep perhaps, the mechanical mind, or at least stop it from interefering.

There may be more use for certain thoughts or prayers further down the line, I don't know, the first order of business seems to be how to get the mechanical mind of of the way. If we keep it busy with a repitious task it can't cope with doing that and inserting intrusive thoughts, if you have one, you lose the other. So it seems to me more about developing focus of attention at the moment, not opening chakras or creating positive vibes or whatever.
 

Kisito

Jedi Council Member
Alada thank you, I think I have grasped the concept of what you said, and it suits my understanding. Focus attention and observation are the foundation of knowledge.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
fwiw I did wonder about this again recently - so after some digging I found the following (I like the technical nuts and bolts of how things work):

http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/4/313.full
Attending to the present: mindfulness meditation reveals distinct neural modes of self-reference

Abstract

It has long been theorised that there are two temporally distinct forms of self-reference: extended self-reference linking experiences across time, and momentary self-reference centred on the present. To characterise these two aspects of awareness, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine monitoring of enduring traits (’narrative’ focus, NF) or momentary experience (’experiential’ focus, EF) in both novice participants and those having attended an 8 week course in mindfulness meditation, a program that trains individuals to develop focused attention on the present. In novices, EF yielded focal reductions in self-referential cortical midline regions (medial prefrontal cortex, mPFC) associated with NF. In trained participants, EF resulted in more marked and pervasive reductions in the mPFC, and increased engagement of a right lateralised network, comprising the lateral PFC and viscerosomatic areas such as the insula, secondary somatosensory cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Functional connectivity analyses further demonstrated a strong coupling between the right insula and the mPFC in novices that was uncoupled in the mindfulness group. These results suggest a fundamental neural dissociation between two distinct forms of self-awareness that are habitually integrated but can be dissociated through attentional training: the self across time and in the present moment.

Since William James’ early conceptualization, the ‘self ’ has been characterised as a source of permanence beneath the constantly shifting set of experiences that constitute conscious life. This permanence is often related to the construction of narratives that weave together the threads of temporally disparate experiences into a cohesive fabric. To account for this continuity, William James posited an explanatory ‘me’ to make sense of the ‘I’ acting in the present moment (James, 1890). Recently, progress has been made in characterizing the neural bases of the processes supporting William James’ ‘me’ in the form of ‘narrative’ self-reference (Gallagher, 2004), highlighting the role of the medial prefrontal cortices (mPFC) in supporting self awareness by linking subjective experiences across time (Neisser, 1997; Northoff and Bermpohl, 2004). The mPFC has been shown to support an array of self-related capacities, including memory for self-traits (Craik et al., 1999; Kelley et al., 2002; Fossati et al., 2003; Macrae et al., 2004), traits of similar others (Mitchell et al., 2006), reflected self-knowledge (Lieberman et al., 2004; Ochsner et al., 2005), and aspirations for the future (Johnson et al., 2006). As such, cortical midline processes may be characterised as supporting narrative self-reference that maintains continuity of identity across time (Gallagher, 2004).

Narrative self-reference stands in stark contrast to the immediate, agentic ‘I’ supporting the notion of momentary experience as an expression of selfhood. Most examinations of self-reference ignore mechanisms of momentary consciousness, which may represent core aspects of self-experience achieved earlier in development (Damasio, 1999; Zelazo and Frye, 1998; Gallagher, 2004) and may have evolved in earlier animal species (Panksepp, 2005). Indeed, little is known about whether the neural substrates underlying momentary self-reference are one and the same, or distinct from, cortical midline structures supporting narrative experience. One hypothesis suggests that awareness of momentary self-reference is neurally distinct from narrative self-reference and is derived from neural markers of transient body states, in particular, right lateralised exteroceptive somatic and interoceptive insular cortices (Damasio, 1999; Craig, 2004; Critchley et al., 2004). In the present study, we examined this thesis.

We investigated these hypothesised dual modes of self-reference by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during attention to two temporally distinct foci of attention: the self as experienced across time and in the immediate moment. One obstacle to investigating present-centred awareness is the well-established tendency for the mind to wander and become distracted from the present moment in favour of temporally distant, stimulus-independent thought (SIT) (Smallwood and Schooler, 2006). SIT consists of automatically generated verbal or visual experiences (McGuire et al., 1996; Teasdale et al., 1995) akin to William James’ notion of a running ‘stream of consciousness’ (James, 1890), the basis of the narrative form of self-reference described above. SIT-related neural activation has been shown to reflect an automatic tendency to engage in narrative processes in the absence of a strong requirement to respond to external stimuli (McKiernan et al., 2006).

The theory of narrative generation as a default state of self-reference is increasingly supported by neural evidence: the cortical midline activity, which underlies narrative-generating mind wandering (Mason et al., 2007) is very similar to activity associated with the ‘default mode’ of resting attention (Gusnard et al., 2001; Raichle et al., 2001). This default mode suggests an endemic reliance upon the networks supporting temporally extended narrative processing, potentially obscuring recruitment of distinct networks for more immediate self-reflection. It may, therefore, be important to study individuals with specific training in monitoring moment-to-moment experience to more reliably recruit the brain regions supporting momentary self-focus in the face of a narrative generation bias. Mindfulness meditation is a form of attentional control training by which individuals develop the ability to direct and maintain attention towards the present moment (Kabat-Zinn et al., 1992; Segal et al., 2002). The current study examined individuals with mindfulness meditation training (MT) in addition to a novice group without such training, in an effort to determine whether the MT group would show an increased capacity to disengage from narrative generation and reveal the neural networks supporting present-centred self-awareness.

To characterise the brain regions supporting the hypothesised dual-modes of self-reference, participants were instructed to assume distinct modes of self-focus. Narrative focus (NF) calls for cognitive elaboration of mental events, thereby reducing attention towards other temporally proximal sensory objects. In contrast, experiential focus (EF) calls for the inhibition of cognitive elaboration on any one mental event in favour of broadly attending to more temporally proximal sensory objects, canvassing thoughts, feelings and physical sensations without selecting any one sensory object. As such, NF has been associated with increased ruminative thoughts about the self, while EF avoids rumination by disengaging attentional processes of self-referential elaboration (Watkins and Teasdale, 2001). In response to reading trait-related adjectives, participants in the present study were asked to engage either: (i) a NF mode, reflecting on what the adjective meant about them as a person or (ii) an EF mode, monitoring their moment-to-moment experience in response to the adjectives. Trait-related adjectives were chosen for their ability to promote self-reflection as evidenced by previous research (e.g. Fossati et al., 2003).

So in short, practice makes you more present (and gives you a broader awareness of everything) and less likely to drift inwards into narratives.
It also calms down a bunch of neural circuits (including the pre-frontal cortex) which are involved in awareness, decision making and emotional regulation.
Given it calms the circuits down, it means the brain will be using up less energy.
 

Alada

The Living Force
RedFox said:
fwiw I did wonder about this again recently - so after some digging I found the following (I like the technical nuts and bolts of how things work):

Thanks for that, I’m kind of nuts n’ bolts at times too, its good to know in theory whats happening under the hood.

Now, having said that and what I wrote earlier, if using the Prayer of the Soul or some other form of words that mean a lot to us, I don’t think we should underestimate the emotional or psychological side of things. Many of us may have grown up within a certain religious framework and, for better for worse, have the ideas of god, prayer, etc hooked up in a certain way. So if it helps us to feel as if we’re aiming in a positive direction there, or we gain some comfort from the words themselves and their meaning/intent, what harm is there in that?

There’s also the thought of what is happening in terms of the signal we’re broadcasting. If one is sincerely asking the universe for help and ‘broadcasting’ that signal via prayer / meditation, who is to say that that doesn’t have a beneficial effect in itself? I don’t know, but again there can be an emotional/psychological component to that too.

I think the thing is not to become engaged in ‘magical’ thinking either way, the thought that things just ‘happen’ without our putting any effort in.

Added: Laura just shared this on the session thread:

Laura said:
Davida said:
Matai said:
...
I am wondering if in the way that I have been practicing this, the point that I am staring at is the "seed" mentioned by the C's?
...

My understanding on ‘seed’ is like intent... or a primer... I guess like the prayer of the soul, a benevolent script in the hope of aiding, and aligning one to being, and a more objective reality/existence.. in practice I think the script it something for the servant to busy himself with, while the master may begin to awaken from some slumber, and set about becoming a good master... I would hope.

One could take, focusing on a point as small ‘aim,’ and just what Laura said... and expend from there.

Just my take, I might be wrong...

You are correct. The main objective is to learn to control the mind chatter, to be able to make it STILL so that the master of the coach can get a word in edgewise, so to say. It's actually a little more complicated than that, but that's good enough. If you can master and still the conscious mind, the "System 2" in Kahnemann's terms, then System 1, unconscious, has the opportunity to be brought to the surface. And even deeper connections can be made as some of you will discover soon enough.
 
It may have something to do with the significance we attribute to certain words/prayers/mantras. I.e. if your background is Christian, the Lord's Prayer speaks to you directly; if you believe in Mantras, they can have a positive effect on your psyche; both are seeds on which you can focus.

If a person were to recite a prayer or mantra in a foreign language, and doesn't understand what the words mean, they would just be a seed on which you can focus your attention. If you understand the words, it's both a seed and a kind of positive affirmation. osit.
 

Kisito

Jedi Council Member
RedFox said:
fwiw I did wonder about this again recently - so after some digging I found the following (I like the technical nuts and bolts of how things work):

http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/4/313.full
Attending to the present: mindfulness meditation reveals distinct neural modes of self-reference

Abstract

It has long been theorised that there are two temporally distinct forms of self-reference: extended self-reference linking experiences across time, and momentary self-reference centred on the present. To characterise these two aspects of awareness, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine monitoring of enduring traits (’narrative’ focus, NF) or momentary experience (’experiential’ focus, EF) in both novice participants and those having attended an 8 week course in mindfulness meditation, a program that trains individuals to develop focused attention on the present. In novices, EF yielded focal reductions in self-referential cortical midline regions (medial prefrontal cortex, mPFC) associated with NF. In trained participants, EF resulted in more marked and pervasive reductions in the mPFC, and increased engagement of a right lateralised network, comprising the lateral PFC and viscerosomatic areas such as the insula, secondary somatosensory cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Functional connectivity analyses further demonstrated a strong coupling between the right insula and the mPFC in novices that was uncoupled in the mindfulness group. These results suggest a fundamental neural dissociation between two distinct forms of self-awareness that are habitually integrated but can be dissociated through attentional training: the self across time and in the present moment.

Since William James’ early conceptualization, the ‘self ’ has been characterised as a source of permanence beneath the constantly shifting set of experiences that constitute conscious life. This permanence is often related to the construction of narratives that weave together the threads of temporally disparate experiences into a cohesive fabric. To account for this continuity, William James posited an explanatory ‘me’ to make sense of the ‘I’ acting in the present moment (James, 1890). Recently, progress has been made in characterizing the neural bases of the processes supporting William James’ ‘me’ in the form of ‘narrative’ self-reference (Gallagher, 2004), highlighting the role of the medial prefrontal cortices (mPFC) in supporting self awareness by linking subjective experiences across time (Neisser, 1997; Northoff and Bermpohl, 2004). The mPFC has been shown to support an array of self-related capacities, including memory for self-traits (Craik et al., 1999; Kelley et al., 2002; Fossati et al., 2003; Macrae et al., 2004), traits of similar others (Mitchell et al., 2006), reflected self-knowledge (Lieberman et al., 2004; Ochsner et al., 2005), and aspirations for the future (Johnson et al., 2006). As such, cortical midline processes may be characterised as supporting narrative self-reference that maintains continuity of identity across time (Gallagher, 2004).

Narrative self-reference stands in stark contrast to the immediate, agentic ‘I’ supporting the notion of momentary experience as an expression of selfhood. Most examinations of self-reference ignore mechanisms of momentary consciousness, which may represent core aspects of self-experience achieved earlier in development (Damasio, 1999; Zelazo and Frye, 1998; Gallagher, 2004) and may have evolved in earlier animal species (Panksepp, 2005). Indeed, little is known about whether the neural substrates underlying momentary self-reference are one and the same, or distinct from, cortical midline structures supporting narrative experience. One hypothesis suggests that awareness of momentary self-reference is neurally distinct from narrative self-reference and is derived from neural markers of transient body states, in particular, right lateralised exteroceptive somatic and interoceptive insular cortices (Damasio, 1999; Craig, 2004; Critchley et al., 2004). In the present study, we examined this thesis.

We investigated these hypothesised dual modes of self-reference by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during attention to two temporally distinct foci of attention: the self as experienced across time and in the immediate moment. One obstacle to investigating present-centred awareness is the well-established tendency for the mind to wander and become distracted from the present moment in favour of temporally distant, stimulus-independent thought (SIT) (Smallwood and Schooler, 2006). SIT consists of automatically generated verbal or visual experiences (McGuire et al., 1996; Teasdale et al., 1995) akin to William James’ notion of a running ‘stream of consciousness’ (James, 1890), the basis of the narrative form of self-reference described above. SIT-related neural activation has been shown to reflect an automatic tendency to engage in narrative processes in the absence of a strong requirement to respond to external stimuli (McKiernan et al., 2006).

The theory of narrative generation as a default state of self-reference is increasingly supported by neural evidence: the cortical midline activity, which underlies narrative-generating mind wandering (Mason et al., 2007) is very similar to activity associated with the ‘default mode’ of resting attention (Gusnard et al., 2001; Raichle et al., 2001). This default mode suggests an endemic reliance upon the networks supporting temporally extended narrative processing, potentially obscuring recruitment of distinct networks for more immediate self-reflection. It may, therefore, be important to study individuals with specific training in monitoring moment-to-moment experience to more reliably recruit the brain regions supporting momentary self-focus in the face of a narrative generation bias. Mindfulness meditation is a form of attentional control training by which individuals develop the ability to direct and maintain attention towards the present moment (Kabat-Zinn et al., 1992; Segal et al., 2002). The current study examined individuals with mindfulness meditation training (MT) in addition to a novice group without such training, in an effort to determine whether the MT group would show an increased capacity to disengage from narrative generation and reveal the neural networks supporting present-centred self-awareness.

To characterise the brain regions supporting the hypothesised dual-modes of self-reference, participants were instructed to assume distinct modes of self-focus. Narrative focus (NF) calls for cognitive elaboration of mental events, thereby reducing attention towards other temporally proximal sensory objects. In contrast, experiential focus (EF) calls for the inhibition of cognitive elaboration on any one mental event in favour of broadly attending to more temporally proximal sensory objects, canvassing thoughts, feelings and physical sensations without selecting any one sensory object. As such, NF has been associated with increased ruminative thoughts about the self, while EF avoids rumination by disengaging attentional processes of self-referential elaboration (Watkins and Teasdale, 2001). In response to reading trait-related adjectives, participants in the present study were asked to engage either: (i) a NF mode, reflecting on what the adjective meant about them as a person or (ii) an EF mode, monitoring their moment-to-moment experience in response to the adjectives. Trait-related adjectives were chosen for their ability to promote self-reflection as evidenced by previous research (e.g. Fossati et al., 2003).

So in short, practice makes you more present (and gives you a broader awareness of everything) and less likely to drift inwards into narratives.
It also calms down a bunch of neural circuits (including the pre-frontal cortex) which are involved in awareness, decision making and emotional regulation.
Given it calms the circuits down, it means the brain will be using up less energy.
Thank you Red fox , there is a lot of information, it deserves to meditate :) But do meditation of the soul is considered a "mindfulness mediation"? I think I remember that Gurdjieff said that let his mind to imagination distanced us from the fourth voice. I think he meant at the concentration or meditation ... Alada,
I read the system 1 & 2, I think there are similarities with mindfulness.
In France, Olivier Lockert, hypnotherapist has developed the "Humanist hypnosis". It presents this new hypnosis as a technique to achieve greater self-awareness. He says some Buddhist priests are formed in this hypnosis!
He says "A living organism like the human body can not remain structured as reports that bind with each of its elements. Any break information (nervous, chemical, cellular, electromagnetic, ionic, molecular, atomic, etc.) result in the degeneration of part or the whole body ... Information is so obviously "neguentropic" ... Increase the "information content" of a living body and ye restructure.
The Humanist hypnotic induction is a consciousness connection, the information fields. "He thinks the old hypnosis is to separate and new hypnosis Humanist is associates. We certainly can't focus on all the things, but perhaps the fact of wanting to concentrate or focus on all things helps us focus ..
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Eulenspiegel said:
It may have something to do with the significance we attribute to certain words/prayers/mantras. I.e. if your background is Christian, the Lord's Prayer speaks to you directly; if you believe in Mantras, they can have a positive effect on your psyche; both are seeds on which you can focus.

If a person were to recite a prayer or mantra in a foreign language, and doesn't understand what the words mean, they would just be a seed on which you can focus your attention. If you understand the words, it's both a seed and a kind of positive affirmation. osit.

Exactly.
 

obyvatel

The Living Force
In my experience with EE, the 3-stage breathing, warrior breathing and bio energetic breathing help quiet the mental chatter.

When we are getting used to doing the program following the audio, the level of effort needed to do the breathing in sync with the instructions is enough to drive out other thoughts.

After some practice, the body gets used to the breathing patterns and then mind wandering starts even as the body is following the audio instructions. At this stage, if we do the program without the audio (as suggested by Laura in the beginning of the program instruction), then the rigor of breathing in the right rhythm and keeping count of the number of breaths as well as the number of rounds we have done puts enough cognitive load on the mind to drive away other thoughts. Thoughts arise "did I miss some counts", "am I doing the second or third round of beatha" etc. Making mistakes is ok - persisting through it helps build attention.

I have found that after sufficient practice, even counting and breathing (without the audio) can become "automatic" while the mind wanders in the midst of these exercises. Here I have tried two approaches. First approach is to just bring the mind back gently to the ongoing breathing activity. The second approach is using some body sensing exercises. Such exercises (taken from Les Fehmi's "Open Focus" technique as one example) increase the cognitive load, can help keeping the focus and improve body awareness. IMO, this is in keeping with EE instructions where Laura says "pay close attention to your body" after finishing certain exercises. Having specific areas of the body to focus on in sequence may work better for some people. Both these approaches have worked for me.

The mind should be relatively free of extraneous thoughts by the time one reaches POTS. Prayer in its real sense is more than repeating words. It is asking for help with some emotional intensity and reaching a state of being open without anticipation. Done properly, it should be very powerful. I am not there yet, but it is where I wish to go.

I treat affirmations differently from prayers. Prayer to me is about asking for help without anticipating when and how such help would come. In prayer one asks from a position of "not having". Affirmation is on the other hand, telling the unconscious that what we wish for is already there, a position of "I already have what I wish for".

fwiw
 

anka

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
obyvatel said:
After some practice, the body gets used to the breathing patterns and then mind wandering starts even as the body is following the audio instructions. At this stage, if we do the program without the audio (as suggested by Laura in the beginning of the program instruction), then the rigor of breathing in the right rhythm and keeping count of the number of breaths as well as the number of rounds we have done puts enough cognitive load on the mind to drive away other thoughts. Thoughts arise "did I miss some counts", "am I doing the second or third round of beatha" etc. Making mistakes is ok - persisting through it helps build attention.

I am curious here as to how do you do the beatha part without audio? I never attempted that, thinking that you actually need to hear the words (if I remember correctly, C's said it is much better that way to experience the effect). But now, when you say you do it without the recording, do you pronounce the words while breathing in and out?

For the rest, I do exercise 3-stage breathing, WB and PotS when I am without an audio device. And on those occasions I actually hear Laura speaking.
 

petite femme

Padawan Learner
I was thinking that the words that you would use for your mantra, should mean something to you personally. I would think that would help you focus on the words you are saying, thinking about what they mean, or is that just more mind chatter?
 

Phill4

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
we don't always breath correctly 24 hours of the day
we don't always think deeply about the words we say

I don't want to say the question is not important from the point of view of study, but it is more essential to practice the exercise with an open mind not influenced by the question of the mechanism of the exercise, but rather try to focus the attention of the words and the breathing as much as possible.

Think of it as an exercise for the soul
 

obyvatel

The Living Force
[quote author=anka]
I am curious here as to how do you do the beatha part without audio? I never attempted that, thinking that you actually need to hear the words (if I remember correctly, C's said it is much better that way to experience the effect). But now, when you say you do it without the recording, do you pronounce the words while breathing in and out?
[/quote]

I do not pronounce "ba" "ha" aloud when I do the program without audio. The words are silently formed in the mind.
 

lilies

Dagobah Resident
Kisito said:
Hello, I want to know if a person know the physiological mechanism of the prayer of the soul?
Why certain words, syntax or repetitions (20 times) they would act on a better future?

That is also the invocation of probable positive vibes or opening the chakras, is it possible to know precisely the mechanism that generates this system? This seems to me magical. I don't recall session or something about it.

Also listening to the Prayer of the Soul with Laura's voice was said to allow the C's to transmit power that can act as a catalyst opening the way for DNA changes, changes in Being, helping creating an enhanced version of yourselves. IIRC.[I was able to find session excerpt, see below.]

I found that trying to match the vibration frequencies in Laura's voice, saying the prayer together with her, aloud, with my own voice creates an amazing feeling of togetherness and harmonic resonance:
1. Sync the timing by beginning together: "Oh, Divine Cosmic Mind.."
2. then only think the next line in your mind: "Holy Awareness in All Creation"
3. take a breath
4. then immediately begin saying aloud: "Holy Awareness in All Creation"

All your phrases said aloud will now match Laura's voice on the tape. Repeat 1. - 4. for the whole prayer. I say two prayers aloud this way. Try to increase the volume on the sound player device so that the volume of Laura's voice will match your own voice loudness. I always listen to her with big headphones, setting the sound-player's volume to hear Laura clear and loud, while I'm saying the words with her. This creates an amazing two-member choir!

I found it creates a powerful resonance that possibly plays a role in aligning the FRV's of the prayer saying group. In a choir when singers put their hearts and mind into the song and want to sing the same song - working for the same aim in Life -, taking care to sing the words at the same time - doing same actions - , they begin to exist or drawn into a sort of Common Shared Resonance. I think that signifies the willingness of each praying choir member to bring forward the common aim and finally realize our plans. This may also help with the DNA changes and open the door for increasing receivership capability.

Harmonic resonance of singing bowls:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=30&v=4MRSBTMnjoA
Barcelona's Overtone Singing Choir:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZY4W0XV074

Session 4 July 2009
Q: (L) Okay, I found the one that I thought it was, which was something about a voice being a part of some plan or destiny. Is that it?

A: Yes but not only. The point is this: when you speak while merged, cosmic elements are transmitted via your voice. More than this, it has the power to heal those of similar goals who are not yet at the correct frequency. In short, through your voice we can set frequency resonance for those of "the blood."

Q: (A**) Wow. (L) What does "while merged" mean?

A: When you speak to aid others, we are able to merge with you.

Q: (J) So, merging is whenever you...

A: We are merging with you right now!

Q: (J) Say something and heal us all, Laura! (A**) Would doing this in groups physically be even more powerful, like if we did workshops?

A: Yes. That will come. And Don mentioned spinning, too. That all has its place along with the "maze dance"; but patience. The meditation and cleansing prayer comes first. You had to go through a "cleansing" too. You are now giving the tools to others so as to enable them to accomplish the same in a different and more efficient way.

Q: (L) So I mean... Just doing this meditation tape the way we plan to do it, people can listen to it, and by listening to it, there is some sort of frequency that can be triggered in them by my voice?

A: Yes. And it can be ten times more powerful in groups with you personally speaking.

Q: (L) That's too weird. (A**) I think it's cool! (C) Wake up the masses!

A: The method has been used nefariously for millennia so what is wrong with FRV in a positive context?! The power of love is also FRV! Only nobody is using it of late.

Q: (L) I feel laryngitis coming on... (laughter) (A**) Uh oh! Somebody get her a scarf! (J) We're gonna have to insure your voice, Laura, for millions. (laughter) (Allen) So is there anything we should do when we're recording you to get you in the zone?

A: No. It already is fine. Notice that some of those on your forum have already noted and experienced this phenomenon.
 

Kisito

Jedi Council Member
lilies said:
Session 4 July 2009
Q: (L) Okay, I found the one that I thought it was, which was something about a voice being a part of some plan or destiny. Is that it?

A: Yes but not only. The point is this: when you speak while merged, cosmic elements are transmitted via your voice. More than this, it has the power to heal those of similar goals who are not yet at the correct frequency. In short, through your voice we can set frequency resonance for those of "the blood."

Q: (A**) Wow. (L) What does "while merged" mean?

A: When you speak to aid others, we are able to merge with you.

Q: (J) So, merging is whenever you...

A: We are merging with you right now!

Q: (J) Say something and heal us all, Laura! (A**) Would doing this in groups physically be even more powerful, like if we did workshops?

A: Yes. That will come. And Don mentioned spinning, too. That all has its place along with the "maze dance"; but patience. The meditation and cleansing prayer comes first. You had to go through a "cleansing" too. You are now giving the tools to others so as to enable them to accomplish the same in a different and more efficient way.

Q: (L) So I mean... Just doing this meditation tape the way we plan to do it, people can listen to it, and by listening to it, there is some sort of frequency that can be triggered in them by my voice?

A: Yes. And it can be ten times more powerful in groups with you personally speaking.

Q: (L) That's too weird. (A**) I think it's cool! (C) Wake up the masses!

A: The method has been used nefariously for millennia so what is wrong with FRV in a positive context?! The power of love is also FRV! Only nobody is using it of late.

Q: (L) I feel laryngitis coming on... (laughter) (A**) Uh oh! Somebody get her a scarf! (J) We're gonna have to insure your voice, Laura, for millions. (laughter) (Allen) So is there anything we should do when we're recording you to get you in the zone?

A: No. It already is fine. Notice that some of those on your forum have already noted and experienced this phenomenon.
Thank you Lys, this suggests that STO prayer is a prayer for others. it would mean that if we pray for ourselves, for exemple like a home, money or for love, it would be one of the STS strength! :shock:
 
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