World Egg Day

casper

The Living Force
Today is the world egg day.
World Egg Day was declared by the International Commission for eggs (International Egg Commission) and he is celebrated every year on the second Friday in October.
On that occasion, I want to share with you a simple recipe, the basic ingredients are naturally eggs.


Recipe: Fritaja ( omelet) with asparagus

one bunch fresh asparagus
c439f6f6839cb673fb1c9a99b1554240.jpg

6 eggs
2 pieces of spring onion
4 slices pancetta or prosciutto
if necessary, salt and pepper

The order procedure:
Bacon cut into narrow strips and fry it, remove pancettu on a plate, and the resulting fat fry spring onions and asparagus.
When the onions and asparagus soft (be careful not to be totally fry), back into the pan bacon and add scrambled eggs.
Good apetite :)


Every year, along the Adriatic coast in the small tourist town in March, April and May (during the growth and harvesting of asparagus) baked omelets with 1000 eggs with 30 kilos of asparagus, and then it looks like this:

Sutra-u-Crikvenici-fritaja-od-sparoga-i-1.000-jaja_ca_large.jpg
 

T.C.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Caveat Lector:

Broken egg yolks oxidise in air and high temperatures, destroying the nutrients and making them unhealthy and dangerous to eat:

_http://undergroundhealthreporter.com/cholesterol-oxidation/#axzz3o5hD7Ga1

Cholesterol oxidation leads to sticky cholesterol that gradually forms plague around the artery walls, the major precursor to heart disease.
 

casper

The Living Force
A little help please, I'm pretty confused, namely on the Croatian Sott Net Anita Šupe, nutritionist from Croatia speaking about the benefits of cholesterol ,link.
http://sott.net/hr93

and in his book suggests that the omelet is healthy for body, link:

https://translate.google.hr/translate?sl=hr&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=hr&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fistineilaziohrani.blogspot.hr%2F2010%2F06%2Flchf-dorucak.html&edit-text=



What is the truth?
When and why cholesterol in omelet oxidized ?Omelette is baked slowly at low temperatures.
 

T.C.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Yes, cholesterol is vital to our health, but it depends which sort of cholesterol. Just do a search online for oxidised cholesterol or oxidised LDL cholesterol.

The health and diet literature and studies tell us that fat is good, right? But it's the same thing - it's the type of fat. Trans fats and rancid vegetable oils, fish oils, olive oils aren't good for a number of reasons.

The diet and health threads like 'Life Without Bread' and 'The Ketogenic Diet' have all the information, plus books like The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, The Vegetarian Myth and Primal Body, Primal Mind are essential reads too.

When and why cholesterol in omelet oxidized ?Omelette is baked slowly at low temperatures.

Again, just do an online search. A temperature of 105c is most often quoted, but does it really matter? If there's a chance it's going to be harmful to cook a broken yolk, and you really want to eat eggs, then just poach, fry or boil them.
 

casper

The Living Force
Thank you for your prompt reply TC, yes, I know that the results of recent studies show that the main "culprit" for coronary heart disease and a major atherogenic LDL is not in its native form, but its oxidized form (I did not know that this is causing the problem in the omelet, thanks for the warning :) ), but i do not understand why someone who advocates the paleo diet and LCHF (Anita Šupe - link on Sott Nett) does not know that? :(
 

T.C.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
casper said:
Thank you for your prompt reply TC, yes, I know that the results of recent studies show that the main "culprit" for coronary heart disease and a major atherogenic LDL is not in its native form, but its oxidized form (I did not know that this is causing the problem in the omelet, thanks for the warning :) ), but i do not understand why someone who advocates the paleo diet and LCHF (Anita Šupe - link on Sott Nett) does not know that? :(

If you read the entire Life Without Bread thread, you get a pretty good idea of how many different factions of Paleo diet advocates there are. Some say some things are good, some say they're bad. They argue between themselves.

Remember, it's always pointed out to us that we shouldn't just rely on one person or source to get our information. Everyone has blind spots and gaps in their awareness. Some people have the cognitive dissonance to know that a certain food is bad for them, but their love of it overrides that. Maybe this Anita just really loves omlettes? Maybe the dish is very culturally programmed into her? Maybe she doesn't know about the egg yolk oxidation problem?

Maybe you could even try contacting her and getting her opinion on it? She might know something we don't :)

Also, to me there's a big difference between a paleo-diet, a ketogenic diet and what we practice here (even though the consensus among us is that ketosis is the desired state). I'd just call our diet "The Scientific Diet", because it's based purely on scientific studies, data, books, research, evidence and personal experimentation, and mass sharing and analysis of same. And it varies for each of us.
 

casper

The Living Force
T.C. said:
Maybe she doesn't know about the egg yolk oxidation problem?

Maybe you could even try contacting her and getting her opinion on it? She might know something we don't :)
I sent a request to Anita, I sent her your link, I'll write here the answer,
thanks again T. C :) :) :)
 
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