Author Topic: Book: Psychopathology of Unjust Prosecutions  (Read 638 times)

Offline Possibility of Being

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Book: Psychopathology of Unjust Prosecutions
« on: January 02, 2017, 05:56:02 PM »
Just came across that book. Haven't read it yet, but sounds promising, so for whoever is interested, here it is.

Three False Convictions, Many Lessons: The Psychopathology of Unjust Prosecutions – September 14, 2016
by David C Anderson and Nigel P Scott


http://www.groundreport.com/understanding-psychopathology-in-existing-power-structures/

Quote
Understanding Psychopathology In Existing Power Structures
by Karen Pruett

While the vast majority of the public is aware that innocent people do end up in prison, most of us do not know the path that leads those poor people into such a terrible situation.  In their book “Three False Convictions Many Lessons“, Anderson and Scott outline succinctly how and why the most vulnerable amongst us are easily forced into false confessions.  But they go beyond the “Reid Technique” and other police tactics used against people that authorities believe “might” be guilty of a crime.  It delves into the psychopathy of the personalities drawn to powerful positions within a given police force, or any other form of power over the public, to illustrate that such people truly know how to work the system and see vulnerable people as objects to further their careers.  Or even as prey.

The poignant stories of Darlie Router, Stefan Kiszko, Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito are examples of how police twisted facts to suit their own agendas, utterly ignoring the evidence and cementing that confirmation bias is a real threat to public safety.  In each case one or more of the authorizes in charge pushed their “agenda” despite clear evidence to the contrary.  These cases are not isolated phenomena and there are thousands of people in prison to prove it, hence the creation and success of entities like the Innocence Project.

The beauty of this book is that it also highlights three cases of wrongful convictions from three countries, the United Kingdom, the United States and Italy, proving that injustice happens everywhere.  The sad part is that all three of the countries represented are First World and so we cannot simply blame a corrupt police force on a substandard government.

The reality is that Constitutional Negative Empathy (CNE) exist at all levels and in all walks of life in all societies.  CNE is the term coined by the authors to be less “pejorative” toward what we commonly refer to as “psychopaths” and “sociopath” so that the public can sympathize with this illness as we would toward all mental or physical illnesses as something to be recognized, treated and maintained. Just as we do with diabetes, heart disease or schizophrenia.

I highly recommend this book for the public, but I also think that it would greatly benefit those in law enforcement.  Each of us are in contact with several CNE’s daily, though we might not recognize them as such, workplace bullying is only one example, so each of us can benefit from the knowledge contained in these pages.  But law enforcement authorities would do well to pay close attention to removal, or control, of CNE’s in a position of power for not only the benefit and integrity of a given police force, but also public safety.

Recognition and control of CNE’s could well be a practical start to reducing wrongful convictions everywhere.

Available on Amazon here.

About the authors (from Amazon):

David Anderson is a former Professor of Medicine in Manchester and Hong Kong who awoke to miscarriages of justice in connection with a former patient of his, Stefan Kiszko, wrongly convicted of the murder of Lesley Molseed.

Nigel Scott is a writer and researcher who has worked extensively with David Anderson on the Knox/Sollecito case.
Between the idea and the reality
Between the motion and the act
Falls the Shadow

Offline shellycheval

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Re: Book: Psychopathology of Unjust Prosecutions
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2017, 12:46:10 PM »
Thank you POB; it sounds like an important subject we all should add to list of things we need to be more aware of.  In the USA, with its high ratio of the population involved with the prison and justice system at some level, I have heard it said that if you are charged with a crime, it is more important to your remaining out of jail, to have a good lawyer than it is to be innocent.  It is indeed a psychopathic world when being innocent of bad behavior is useless unless one has the money to hire an expert attorney.  It adds insult to injury that so many who are in the higher socioeconomic strata choose to believe the system works the same for everyone.
"Emancipate yourself from mental slavery--none but ourselves can free our minds  .  .  ."     Bob Marley

“If the workers of the world want to win, all they have to do is recognize their own solidarity. They have nothing to do but fold their arms and the world will stop. The workers are more powerful with their hands in their pockets than all the property of the capitalists. . . .”
(from Howard Zinn’s "A Peoples’ History of the United States")


“Out beyond ideas of who is right or wrong, there is a field.  I’ll meet you there.”  Rumi

Offline JGeropoulas

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Re: Book: Psychopathology of Unjust Prosecutions
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2017, 06:15:54 PM »
<snip>
The reality is that Constitutional Negative Empathy (CNE) exist at all levels and in all walks of life in all societies.  CNE is the term coined by the authors to be less “pejorative” toward what we commonly refer to as “psychopaths” and “sociopath” so that the public can sympathize with this illness as we would toward all mental or physical illnesses as something to be recognized, treated and maintained. Just as we do with diabetes, heart disease or schizophrenia.
<snip>
I like this idea because it's become the "standard"--and quite successful pharmaceutical marketing ploy to simplify complicated/scary medical disorders into simple, user-friendly 3-letter acronyms, such as IBS vs. "Irritable bowel syndrome" or TIA vs. "Transient ischemic attack" (stroke). 

That said, some are kind of ridiculous such as DEF for "deaf" or SAD for "seasonal affective disorder (i.e. winter blues).  And others, work in the reverse to make simple things seems more serious and thus more in need of yet another pharmaceutical concoction, such as OAB for "Overactive bladder"  :/

I'm not a god...an angel...a spirit.  I'm awake. -- Buddha
The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes -- Marcel Proust