New discovery around Stonehenge

Esprit

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
New: Historic find deepens Stonehenge mystery.
I'm not sure what it is, theyre saying a 'shaft' circling around the site. Could it be something to circulate energy around the site ? A bit like the grooves on Malta. Maybe someone has a better understanding that can explain I'm just guessing.


 

Debra

Jedi Master
New: Historic find deepens Stonehenge mystery.
I'm not sure what it is, theyre saying a 'shaft' circling around the site. Could it be something to circulate energy around the site ? A bit like the grooves on Malta. Maybe someone has a better understanding that can explain I'm just guessing.


I'm glad it is getting a bit of video News exposure.
I posted the article a few days ago here:

The measurements of the shafts are VERY interesting, as they are quite large:
[...] the site consists of at least 20 huge shafts, more than 10 meters (32 feet) in diameter and 5 meters (16 feet) deep, forming a circle more than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter. "
 

Jenn

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
There's also this SOTT article: Huge 4,500-year-old stone circle discovered near Stonehenge -- Sott.net
Archaeologists have discovered a major new prehistoric monument just a short distance away from Stonehenge. Some 20 or more massive prehistoric shafts - more than 10 metres wide and five metres deep - form a vast circle more than two kilometres in diameter around the Durrington Walls henge. Coring of the shafts suggest the features are neolithic and excavated more than 4,500 years ago, around the time Durrington Walls was built. It is thought the shafts served as a boundary to a sacred area or precinct associated with the henge.
[...]
Dr Richard Bates, of the university's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said: 'Yet again, the use of a multidisciplinary effort with remote sensing and careful sampling is giving us an insight to the past that shows an even more complex society than we could ever imagine. 'Clearly sophisticated practices demonstrate that the people were so in tune with natural events to an extent that we can barely conceive in the modern world we live in today.' Tim Kinnaird, of the same school, said: 'The sedimentary infills contain a rich and fascinating archive of previously unknown environmental information. 'With optically stimulated luminescence profiling and dating, we can write detailed narratives of the Stonehenge landscape for the last 4,000 years.'
 
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