3 large greenhouses but what to grow?

Pierre

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michaelrc said:
I was thinking with the earth changes and all the airborne particulate that planning this sorta thing might be an exercise in futility. Will our sun snap out of it's doldrums after the change? Wasn't planning to till the garden soil in prep for spring thinking what's the point? Gosh if I had a greenhouse though I might risk the energy and give it a go for non GMO fresh produce and herbs. Not trying to be overly negative but wishing... well not sure on my knowledge I suppose.
I understand how you feel but we must remember that even if global cooling happens we don't really know when and how severely it will strike. Therefore we have to find a balance where we act according to the current weather condition while keeping in mind it could change anytime.

In any case, in the event of global cooling having three large operational greenhouses could be a definite plus.
 

Laura

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Neil said:
This was kind of ranty, very politically incorrect post, but that is the backdrop you've moved into, and while a lot of it is probably that ponerogenesis divide and conquer stuff, there are some genuine reasons for the animosity in my opinion. Just be aware.
Thanks for that, Neil. Pretty much what I wished to convey.

Meager1, just find out what other people are growing successfully and imitate. Don't fix it if it ain't broke.
 

Yupo

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Generally the "Yankees" live in their own segregated neighborhoods, go shopping at their own special venues, and only converse with their "yankee" friends because they are the only ones who can tolerate them; they have no ties to the community. We are merely servants for them because they did the honor of parking some of their money in our town, therefore we owe them.
Ha Ha Ha!
It is some version of the same story everywhere, I guess.
Here in NC we have a suburb of Raleigh called Cary (Concentrated Area of Relocated Yankees, we like to say). I have friends there (relocated yankees) that just love living there with all their yankee friends. They go on and on about what a bargain are the overpriced homes there, getting more of their buddies to move down, driving up the prices for everyone else. The rest of the state (mostly) and nation are in something of a recession with increasing unemployment, businesses sinking, mortgages underwater, etc. In Cary, people are lined up around the block (OK, I exaggerate a bit) to shop at the organic dog biscuit bakery in the high end shopping center. Talk about frivolity. These people do not appear to be touched by hard times. They are, however financially touched by the trauma of fickleness of countertop fashion investments.
I find it awkward to hang with this crowd. It feels sort of colonial and I'm part of the local labor. *sigh*
I have thought about moving there, sharing a plenty-large house with a friend. I have thought it might be good for me to spend more time around upbeat, sociable people. I don't think I'd fit in anymore. It would be very hard to go back to that kind of materialism, or even be around it so much anymore.

Back to the subject of greenhouses/gardening... How exciting for you! I hope you will keep us posted on what grows well for you. I did not know there were any highlands in Florida.
Zone 9? You can grow tropical fruit, avocados, perpetual roses. Lucky you.
 

weasel3d

Jedi
I'd also grow vegetables that are generally expensive in stores, as well as vegetables that are often found in stores as GMO varieties. So go and grow them organic. Best of luck.
 

Meager1

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Yupo, it seems to be debatable as to whether this is zone 8 or 9, or a little of both.

There is one site that claims gardeners should act as if it is zone 8b, and I think that sounds the most likely, and is probably why several different apples can be grown here.

I have checked out the local nursery's and even the Low's and Wal-Mart plant sections and there does seem to be a great variety of plants to choose from, even some fairly exotic things that will do well here.

I have 3 different variety's of onions started so far and am still waiting for some ordered seeds to come in .

And Laura, I just wanted to say too, that there has been a kinda hullaballoo at the house across the street, I'm not sure exactly what happened, but it appears that one local family had found some way to highjack their electricity and just got caught at it.

I think they were taken out by the police because the house has no electricity now and their dogs have been here since yesterday.

The dogs have been here before to check me out, and wander around the yard, but they always went home.

Yesterday they wouldn't leave and hid under a table in the shade house out back all day.

I put food and water out for them and it's looking like they decided to stay awhile.

The only other person I've ever heard of who knew how to steal electricity was the Coral

Castle guy.. makes me wonder what these locals were up to!
 

MusicMan

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Hello Meager1, seeing as you live in a tropical area, why not see if you can grow Mangoes?
Mango trees can grow quite large and produce masses of fruit, which you could market.
Over here in Oz, they sell at $1 each (Avocadoes are similar). 300 trees at 300 mangoes per tree..

As for the green house, it might be good if the globe goes into a cooling stage.
Lettuce varieties are often grown with hydroponic systems, and the fish would keep the water clean while supplying you with protein. You might use solar power for the pumps.

I think the herbs are a great idea, and if you can get the medicinal varieties, it might prove useful.
Various herbs are used in parasite purging, a little research will tell you what is best.

Some fruit varieties if you could grow something that will produce a lot of vitamin C would be handy, lemons are good, and citrus generally will produce all year round if you don't pick the crop all at once.

If you have stock, for your protein and fat supplies, you might want to try to grow something to feed them, sweet potatoes maybe, or for your eggs you might have a go at chickens, and they can keep the weeds and snails down as well as other bugs.
 

DougEE

Jedi
FOTCM Member
There is a research farm for tropical agriculture in Fort Myers Forida where I and 350 other snowbirds volunteer every winter. It is a great resource for learning about what grows best in various soil conditions. You mentioned Moringa. Yes that is a very important tree for tropical regions, but we also promote Chaya and Neem as important trees/plants for sustaining healthy communities. It is called the Echo Global Farm and the website is www.echonet.org and if you want to research any plant, try this website

http://www.echocommunity.org/plants/category/all

I enjoy my visits to Florida and especially visiting the local Cracker areas. Yes there are rednecks there (as in most places) but loveable in their own ways. One way to get involved with your neighbours is to set up your green houses for a community garden where others can use your facilities to grow their own exotic preferences. The 'fee' for using your facilities could be a share of their 'crop' or a food donation towards an end-of-season group harvest celebration. Moreover, a local food bank may also benefit from such a community garden.

Just my 2 cents, and good luck with your endeavours.
 

Yupo

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I just wanted to say too, that there has been a kinda hullaballoo at the house across the street, I'm not sure exactly what happened, but it appears that one local family had found some way to highjack their electricity and just got caught at it.

I think they were taken out by the police because the house has no electricity now and their dogs have been here since yesterday.
"Taken out by police" makes it sound like they were shot and killed! Oh my! Still, nothing would surprise these days. My guess is that the critters might well understand the danger of being near the police. I do wonder sometimes the extent of their ability to communicate emotionally and at distance. I think they know far more than most people think they know.
 

Laura

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MusicMan said:
Hello Meager1, seeing as you live in a tropical area, why not see if you can grow Mangoes?
Mango trees can grow quite large and produce masses of fruit, which you could market.
Over here in Oz, they sell at $1 each (Avocadoes are similar). 300 trees at 300 mangoes per tree..
She's too far north for Mangoes. They do best below the center of the state down to Miami.

Find out what people want that will grow there and go for that. No point in growing stuff if you don't have a market.
 

Meager1

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Thank you for the links DougEE, there are many interesting plant selections that might be worth a try on the main site. Echo is doing great work!

I'll continue doing some more research since there is time yet before spring planting, and I still need to follow all those hoses up from the lake and get the fish "bins" by the first greenhouse baled out and repaired.

There is still a lot yet to do before actual planting.

I did grab a bale of hay at the local Ace Hardware and am in the first week of the conditioning process. I used the hay bale method last year with great success, but this time I want to try breaking open the bale after conditioning and wrapping up a tight wad of hay to fill individual
containers/pots. I have found no information on that possibility what's so ever, so the only way to know if it will work, is to try it.

Keeping my fingers crossed because it would save a ton of money, not having to buy dirt.
Anyway, thanks everybody for the replies.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
Hello Meager1,
I did grab a bale of hay at the local Ace Hardware and am in the first week of the conditioning process. I used the hay bale method last year with great success, but this time I want to try breaking open the bale after conditioning and wrapping up a tight wad of hay to fill individual
containers/pots. I have found no information on that possibility what's so ever, so the only way to know if it will work, is to try it.

Keeping my fingers crossed because it would save a ton of money, not having to buy dirt.
Anyway, thanks everybody for the replies.
It can be useful to add to your tight wad of hay a little dirt, to have more chance of success, and not
waste seeds, time and money.
Good luck !
 

Yupo

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
There is an excellent article over at Lowtech Magazine on plant/crop protection, including greenhouse variation through the years. Might be good information for everyone to keep in mind with possibility of cooler times to come. Also see the secondary article on Chinese Greenhouses.

This has the article of fruit wall technology:
http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/
This is the piece on Chinese greenhouses:
http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2015/12/reinventing-the-greenhouse.html
 

Yupo

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Allow me to plug Lowtech Magazine and their sister site Notech Magazine. Both excellent.

Back to the subject at hand... I have re-thought my greenhouse location plan so as to take advantage of the tall, south facing wall of my house. I think the insulating night shades could be made from inexpensive mylar emergency blankets adhered to some kind of layered roll-up shading system.
I am right on the border of 8A and 7B. It does get quite cold sometimes, but generally winters are mild. Lately, lots of extremes.
 

Ruth

The Living Force
You could start a community co-op. If you can't fill the space of three green houses, you can be there may be people around you that might like to be involved in helping you fill the space.... :) Or even working in the greenhouses if they can grow their own food. A neighbourhood project?
 
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