About Homeopathy- conceptions and missconceptions

whitecoast

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I hope this inspires some people to look more into this healing system. Like I said, I find it absolutely fascinating and am really enjoying learning about it!

I'm definitely curious to learn more about it dugdeep, so thanks for sharing your own passion for it. :-)

If I was to go about learning about homeopathy's history and the medical developments within that system of healing, maybe talking also about offshoots and innovations/adulterations, what history would you recommend?

And that's the other issue. Because the system has been around for around 200 years, there have been a lot of off-shoots and different styles of using the system. There are a lot of different practitioners out there calling themselves homeopaths who aren't, strictly speaking, practicing homeopathy (this isn't a judgement on the effectiveness of what they're practicing, mind you). I think the important thing to keep in mind is that classical homeopathy is a science based on sound principles that have remained mostly unchanged over the course of homeopathy's history. Innovations are often shortcuts, added frills, or speculative methods that aren't based on long-tested practices.

In addition to the Organon 6th Edition, what resources on the topic of homeopathy, looking back, have been the most useful to you? Or is that by and large the be-all, end-all? I've also seen a book called Medica Materia around. How does that fit into the bigger picture and history of homeopathy?

I can only guess there must be developments in treatment know-how by the field of classical homeopathy. Would a homeopath in training (a self-described student like yourself) train under a homeopath to acquire case studies to learn better formulations? Are there professional societies of classical homeopaths that share and network about this kind of information, and is that information publicly available?

No practitioner is perfect, whatever the healing modality. In your own experience (I don't know how many homeopaths you've worked with), what types of mistakes in healing tend to be the most common for homeopathic professionals to make? I know you mentioned a plethora of "newfangled-itis" among the innovators/adulterators of the modality, but setting them aside for now, what about the classical old-school homeopaths?

I was looking into homeopathy after hearing some were able to write mask exemptions, and this one in my area looked quite legit. She had a book for sale for $99 and a comment about grinding a material with milk sugar while tapping into the collective consciousness. :-/ So I though, "hmm, maybe I should do my own homework more intelligently before I start looking for practitioners since at the moment I'm not even sure what to look for in a good practitioner." (Aside from having a long and detailed intake interview).

Thanks for the suggestions and resources provided @SevenFeathers and @Channa.
 

dugdeep

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Great questions, whitecoast!

I'm definitely curious to learn more about it dugdeep, so thanks for sharing your own passion for it. :-)

If I was to go about learning about homeopathy's history and the medical developments within that system of healing, maybe talking also about offshoots and innovations/adulterations, what history would you recommend?

That's a tough one. One of the best books I found on the subject is called Hahnemann Revisited by Dr Luc De Schepper. Mind you, it's a textbook, it's expensive, pretty dense and is aimed at actually teaching students methods, philosophy and practical minutiae about practicing. The first 100 pages are an excellent summation of the developments in Hahnemann's work and the differences between the different editions of the Organon, as well as some of the offshoots (of which De Schepper is pretty critical). But unless someone is actually pursuing becoming a practitioner, I don't know if I'd recommend buying the book.

For a good primer on homeopathy in general there's a good book aimed at a general audience called Homeopathy: Beyond Flat Earth Medicine by Timothy R. Dooley. It's pretty easy to find free PDFs of it online. As far as I remember, it doesn't get too much into the developments in the system, but it does provide a pretty good foundation.

There are probably a number of books out there that would cover what you're looking for, probably many articles online too, but unfortunately I can't think of any.

In addition to the Organon 6th Edition, what resources on the topic of homeopathy, looking back, have been the most useful to you? Or is that by and large the be-all, end-all? I've also seen a book called Medica Materia around. How does that fit into the bigger picture and history of homeopathy?
The Organon is dense, difficult to understand but loaded with incredible insights. I'd liken it to reading Gurdjieff, in that it's "all there" for anyone with enough tenacity to plumb its depths. Again, I wouldn't recommend it for the layperson. Inspiring books for me would be the aforementioned Hahnemann Revisited, The Science of Homeopathy by George Vithoukas and Homeopathic Psychology by Philip Bailey (although I'm a little less enamored with that last one since I've learned more).

Materia Medica's are a little different. They're a usually-painstakingly detailed list of all the characteristics of a remedy given in a 'proving' (when they give a medicine to healthy persons and meticulously record all the symptoms that manifest, therefore getting a close to a complete list of all the symptoms a particular remedy will cure). The Materia Medica is an essential tool in the toolbox for a homeopath. There are simplified Materia Medicas out there that may focus on the 'keynotes' of different remedies, but some are as many as 12 volumes, they're so extensive.

There are hundreds of Materia Medica out there at this point; the first one written by Hahnemann with hundreds (if not thousands) of later homeopaths building upon his initial publication. Any homeopath out there probably has multiple different ones and generally consults many in any given case.

I can only guess there must be developments in treatment know-how by the field of classical homeopathy. Would a homeopath in training (a self-described student like yourself) train under a homeopath to acquire case studies to learn better formulations? Are there professional societies of classical homeopaths that share and network about this kind of information, and is that information publicly available?
As with any system of knowledge, finding good teachers is needed for learning! I think training under an experienced practitioner is a must, whether that be some kind of mentor situation, or more often a formal school. Even within classically trained homeopathy, there are probably as many approaches as there are practitioners (although the core method would be the same, there are an infinite number of different approaches to that method), so being in a school where you're exposed to different teachers and different approaches has its advantages.

How much information is out there publicly available (as in, for free) is, as you might expect, limited - there's a lot of articles, videos and even some books you can find, but to get to the deep learning you're going to find you have to pay for it (in my experience). On the other hand, there's a great deal of information for established homeopaths on refining their skills or trying different approaches (this is mostly paid for, but there is some free or cheap stuff if you hunt for it). There are lots of different homeopath societies out there who have different missions, and often they have conferences or webinars, but I haven't found any that will take a neophyte under their wing and teach them everything they need to know - I'm not sure if that's what you're asking, though. There are a lot of articles out there with different practitioners sharing different findings and a number of homeopaths have specific systems that they've developed that they then teach to others (this is almost always charged for). There are also conferences, webinars, classes, etc. I have come across some that do the hard sales pitches ("Do you want to get superior results in less time?"), but most of whats out there seems genuine. I've found that this site has some excellent content for sale and usually offer free previews.

I was really fortunate in that I contacted a published homeopath and he took me under his wing, to a limited extent, and kinda showed me the ropes over email while working my way through his books, which was extremely generous of him! But after working with him for some time (at a certain point he had to stop due to other commitments) I realized there were still large gaps in my knowledge and decided to try to find a school, which is where I'm at now. I think one thing that is vital in learning this system is supervised work with patients, which is something only a school is going to be able to provide. You can only get so much from books.

No practitioner is perfect, whatever the healing modality. In your own experience (I don't know how many homeopaths you've worked with), what types of mistakes in healing tend to be the most common for homeopathic professionals to make? I know you mentioned a plethora of "newfangled-itis" among the innovators/adulterators of the modality, but setting them aside for now, what about the classical old-school homeopaths?
It's impossible to say. I think the more experience a homeopath has, the less likely he or she is to make mistakes, but everybody makes them. I also don't think I have enough experience to even comment on it (how can a beginner criticize an experienced practitioner with any credibility?) Even to criticize the non-purists is a bit haughty of me since they may be getting good results, it just doesn't interest me as much as the classical system.

I was looking into homeopathy after hearing some were able to write mask exemptions, and this one in my area looked quite legit. She had a book for sale for $99 and a comment about grinding a material with milk sugar while tapping into the collective consciousness. :-/ So I though, "hmm, maybe I should do my own homework more intelligently before I start looking for practitioners since at the moment I'm not even sure what to look for in a good practitioner." (Aside from having a long and detailed intake interview).

Thanks for the suggestions and resources provided @SevenFeathers and @Channa.
It's tricky for a patient to make sure a given practitioner is "good". Even someone "tapping into the collective consciousness" would be fine as long as their methods are sound, leaving the woowoo dross aside. I think one thing you could do is look at their credentials - what school did they attend and what certification do they have? Maybe look at some online reviews from patients who have worked with them (this can be tricky, though, as homeopathy is always under attack by rabid materialists who will leave bad reviews without even having worked with them, and on the other hand, a practitioner is only going to publicize good reviews themselves). But even saying that, theoretically there might be some self-taught homeopaths out there with no certification who are excellent practitioners, so it's difficult to navigate. Word of mouth may be your best resource.

Hope that helps!
 

Channa

Jedi
Hello Whitecoast,

There are many books on homeopathy and it is difficult to make a good choice

I worked for 10 years with a homeopath, who also gave courses and seminars to explain and understand homeopathy.
This fascinated me and I continued, as a self-taught person, to study medicinal plants and all that they had brought to humans and all that they have brought to humans (and animals) around the world.

The problem is to find the right homeopath, because there is the problem of the dilution of the remedy.

I use 5ch remedies for everyday ailments.

You can have a migraine and take an allopathic pill, but if you go to the homeopath, he will prescribe you, for example, a remedy that will cure the liver that causes these migraines.

For me, homeopathy is a "subtle" medicine which allows us to take into account the person in his physical, moral and mental entirety.
Hence the difficulty of having a "subtle" homeopath.

For me, a homeopath, as you wrote, giving "mask exemptions", is not a good homeopath.... Sorry....
If a person feels safe wearing the mask, let them put it on.
I wore the mask when it was compulsory (to be left alone) and I thought nothing of it, and I took it off as soon as possible.

The books Organon and Materia Medica are classics of homeopathy.

If you read French (I don't know if these books are translated into English) :
A good approach, a book on the energy and function of plants in correspondence with human energy:
« L’Homme et les plantes médicinales », de Whilhelm Pelikan (en relation avec Rudolph Steiner) 3 Tomes aux Editions Triades

Wikipedia :
Wilhelm Pelikan (born in Pola (Istria) on 3 December 1893 - died in Arlesheim on 17 November 1981) was a chemist, anthroposophist, pharmacist, gardener and practitioner of anthroposophical medicine.

For those who have children, but valid for all, so detailed is it:
« L’Homéopathie à l’écoute de l’enfant » de Dr Herman Leduc – Ed Didier Hatier.

I treated my son with this book: when he was ill, I had the opinion of a GP (to know what exactly he had) who prescribed me allopathic medicines but this doctor knew that I would give the homeopathic remedies and so he gave me three days to treat my son with my remedies and after this date, if it didn't work, I had to give the medicines of the prescription.
And it always worked well!

And for everyday ailments:
Dictionnaire homéopathique by Louis Pommier, Livre de Poche N°7857

I hope this will help you

Tenderness for all
Channa

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 

whitecoast

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I finished reading Homeopathy: Beyond Flat Earth Medicine by Timothy R. Dooley, and it was a great little crash course on the modality. I found it quite interesting that homeopathic remedies were not vulnerable to oxidation, but instead strong magnetic fields (such as those from microwaves), sunlight, and even suffered interference by acupuncture. Definitely seems to me like it's information itself that is being administered to an individual.

I like the Victorian era joke told halfway through: a woman goes to the homeopathy clinic and asks for one four hundredths of a gram of phosphate of magnesia, and the pharmacist says, "Sorry, we don't sell amounts that large here." (I like to think it was a German pharmacist with broken English who meant to say we don't have potencies that high).

I googled how people perform the serial dilutions and I came across a homeopathic doctor who shared how to do the Korsakov method of serial dilutions, which is a technique invented by a Russian officer who practiced homeopathy. The army suffered a lot of acute infections, and to deal with this he recommended making an autologous ("from self") homeopathic remedy. He told his men to fill their canteens with water, get a mucus membrane tissue or secretion that had the infectious agent sample on their bayonet, dip it in the canteen, concuss it fifty times, dump the water, add fresh water, and re-concuss. This was repeated five times (called K-5) and was used as a homeopathic remedy. Seems much more "quick and dirty" than a remedy that would be made today under GMP conditions, but it seems like it could serve as a way to make quick home remedies. It almost seems comparable to autohemotherapy, and IMO could be very synergistic with it if you're actually suffering from an acute infection like Covid.
 

Channa

Jedi
Hello Whitecoast

I read your message with interest, but I was stopped by this sentence
« but it seems like it could serve as a way to make quick home remedies. It almost seems comparable to autohemotherapy, and IMO could be very synergistic with it if you're actually suffering from an acute infection like Covid.”

For me, homeopathy treats the person (and the animals) according to a whole series of criteria.
There is the "terrain" of the person, what he is,
their personality (strong, fearful, sad, always happy, afraid, etc)
their behaviour in relation to what they suffer from
their history, their experiences
etc, etc

So, if I have a rheumatism attack, for example, I will have a remedy X because I get better when I move, another remedy if I am relieved by staying in bed, another remedy if this rheumatism occurs in dry, wet or cold weather....
Hence the subtlety of this medicine
And after that, the difficulty to make a self-medication if you don't really know how to do it.

It is also necessary to know that a certain remedy will only be given after another one which will have cleared the way to go towards the cure...

The other "problem": dilution.
You spoke about the K dilution.
Which one are you going to take, according to what criteria?
And you don't talk about the Ch dilution.
A dilution that is not appropriate for the person can do damage or not heal at all.

For me, it is a very subtle medicine, and therefore there is a long way to go to identify and understand it;
See Dilution homéopathique — Wikipédia

Tenderness for all
Channa

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 

Kari Baba

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I thought about the possibility of a homeopathic vaccination and did a little research. The main motivation was the theoretical possibility of an outbreak of smallpox or the plague. Since I am not a homeopath, I hope to receive feedback at this point as to whether my thoughts are going in the right direction or whether I am possibly wrong.

I found an excerpt from a 1963 book written by a doctor and homeopath Dr. med. Emil Rehm. Since the book is unfortunately not available in English, I have translated the relevant part:

Can you vaccinate homeopathically?

For years, children who are easily and severely vaccinated have come to my treatment, children who have suffered damage from smallpox, diphtheria or polio vaccinations. The simplest solution would be to refuse any vaccination, which would conflict with the law on smallpox vaccination. {Note: the smallpox vaccination was compulsory in the GDR until 1980.}

The question automatically arose: is it not possible to vaccinate homeopathically? One should also think of isopathy. ...

... A reliable prevention against poliomyelitis is Lathyrus sativus. In the D200 potency (single intake) it was effective in preventing polio in thousands of observed cases. ...

... For several years I have been giving all children who came to me for the smallpox vaccination a single dose of Variolinum D200 (4 weeks before the actual vaccination). Even if my numbers are not large (10 children per year), the observations are conclusive enough to be published. Only 1-2 of the children got the pustule on their arm after the actual smallpox vaccination. Even 2 to 3 re-vaccinations did not change anything in this observation. A state vaccination doctor (as a colleague reported to me) had re-vaccinated the children 2 to 3 times because he had doubts about the colleague's vaccination technique. Without success in terms of creating a pustule at the vaccinated site.

It must therefore be established that a single intake of Variolinum D200 produces immunity to cowpox in 80-90% of children. {Note: The live vaccine used in the smallpox vaccination was always the relatively harmless cowpox. But the lifelong immunity it creates also extends to smallpox.} If the production of immunity is called vaccination, 80-90% of all children can be successfully vaccinated homeopathically or, better, isopathically. ....
From a summary by Dr. Anton Rohrer I found the following:

Homeopathic Epidemic Treatment - A Success Story

1796 is not only considered to be the birth of homeopathy, the year is also considered to be the birth of vaccinations, as the Englishman Edward Jenner (1749-1823) carried out the first vaccination against cowpox on an eight-year-old child on May 15, 1796
by. It had been observed that the harmless cowpox protected against the much more dangerous human pox disease.
In the Duchy of Saxony-Weimar, vaccination had been compulsory since 1826. It was all the more surprising that a smallpox epidemic broke out in 1831 and many people died within a short time.

Hahnemann also speaks positively about the cowpox vaccination in Organon: “This seems to be the reason for the charitable, strange event that, since the general spread of Jenner's cowpox vaccination, the
Human smallpox will never again appear among us neither as epidemic nor as malicious as it did 40-50 years ago, when a city affected by it lost at least half and often three quarters of its children to the most miserable deaths from the plague. "
(Note 95 to § 46).
§56 (note in connection with isopathy): "... and so by the general spread of their inoculation have put an end to all epidemics of that deadly, terrible human pox in such a way that the current generation has no vivid idea of that former hideous human pox- Pest has more ”.

Variolinum:

H.C. Allen writes in his nosode book: "There are reports about Variolinum from Dr. Fellger. He gave Variolinum to hundreds of people and none of them ever got smallpox". (That doesn't have to mean anything, because who says these people ever came into contact with the smallpox virus?). He continues: “In a family where the father had confluent smallpox, he gave it
other members, none of whom had been vaccinated, used Variolinum as a prophylactic, and none of them contracted the disease. "

That speaks for the effectiveness of Variolinum.
Edward Anshutz quotes in his book "New, old and forgotten Remedies" a nice statistic from a lecture given by Dr. Charles Eaton, for the American Institute of Homeopathy in 1907 on Variolinum as a homeopathic vaccination
and prophylaxis. There was a smallpox epidemic in Iowa in 1902 and the speaker summarizes the findings of the various homeopaths:

2806 people received Variolinum mostly in the C 30, 547 unvaccinated people from this group had demonstrably direct contact with smallpox sufferers (family members who had to care for them), of which 14 got smallpox. That is 2.5% in whom the disease occurs, although there is no natural resistance against smallpox, so the disease normally occurs in 100% of those infected.

Also C.M. Boger says similarly: “They [the nosodes] are also used as prophylactic agents, since they produce a safer immunity than can be achieved with other means. I was able to use Variolinum in particular, the pock nosode, to my complete satisfaction. After a Varioline administration, it was even possible for unvaccinated people to care for and live with those suffering from smallpox. In this way, the children of the families could be protected from smallpox.
In over a dozen such cases, there was not a single infection "
(Lectures on Materia Medica).
For me as a layman in the field of homeopathy, the question of potency in prophylactic use arises at this point. Emil Rehm worked with the D200 potency. Others, as in the last article with C30. I would be very grateful for an explanation or thoughts on this.
 

SevenFeathers

Jedi Council Member
I thought about the possibility of a homeopathic vaccination
Hpathy.com is a great place to continue your research. This article, for one, goes into detail on this subject: Homeopathic Vaccination & Prophylaxis - Thomas Kruzel

An excerpt:

The use of homeopathic nosodes and using the simillimum during outbreaks of epidemics has been a part of homeopathic medicine since its inception by Hahnemann in the late 1700’s. In fact, it was the success of homeopathic medicines during an epidemic of Scarlatina in Germany in 1801 that brought rapid recognition to an emerging medical therapy. Hahnemann published a pamphlet Cure and Prevention of Scarlet Fever in 1801. At the time he promoted Belladonna as a specific prophylactic remedy for Scarlatina. This was later changed to include Aconite as other homeopaths found it worked as well.

The author goes on to detail other epidemics and how homeopathy was used.

I am not a homeopath but have found that site to be a great place to read and research.
 

Kari Baba

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Hpathy.com is a great place to continue your research. This article, for one, goes into detail on this subject: Homeopathic Vaccination & Prophylaxis - Thomas Kruzel

An excerpt:

The use of homeopathic nosodes and using the simillimum during outbreaks of epidemics has been a part of homeopathic medicine since its inception by Hahnemann in the late 1700’s. In fact, it was the success of homeopathic medicines during an epidemic of Scarlatina in Germany in 1801 that brought rapid recognition to an emerging medical therapy. Hahnemann published a pamphlet Cure and Prevention of Scarlet Fever in 1801. At the time he promoted Belladonna as a specific prophylactic remedy for Scarlatina. This was later changed to include Aconite as other homeopaths found it worked as well.

The author goes on to detail other epidemics and how homeopathy was used.

I am not a homeopath but have found that site to be a great place to read and research.
Thanks for the link! I will deal with it a little more closely and will have a lot to read in the near future. 🤓
 
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