Another Hit for the Cs? Movement of Zone of Precipitation?

Laura

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Here is the relevant clip from the session dated 9 May 1998:

Q: I would like to know
what the geographic coordinates, according to our current
grid system, that would frame Atlantis. I don't need the
exact shape, just a general box shape... the perimeter...

A: Like asking: "What are the geographic coordinates of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization?"

Q: Okay, let me get more specific: the Atlantean land that
was supposed to have existed in the Atlantic Ocean... what
was the farthest north of any any part of Atlantis that
was in the ocean, that no longer exists?

A: It is "time for you" to know that Atlantis was not a
nation, land, Island, or continent, but rather, a
civilization!

Q: All I wanted was to have an idea of a land mass in the
Atlantic ocean that people talk about - where did it sit?

A: Where do you think?

Q: Well, I sort of think that the Azores and the Canary
Islands are sort of...

A: Yes, but many other places too. Remember, the sea level
was several hundred feet lower then...

Q: Why was the sea level several hundred feet lower? Because
there was ice somewhere or because there was not as much
water on the earth at that time?

A: Ice.

Q: Was the ice piled up at the poles? The ice sheet of the
ice age?

A: Yes.

Q: So, Atlantis existed during the ice age?

A: Largely, yes. And the world's climate was scarcely any
colder away from the ice sheets than it is today.

Q: Well, how could that be? What caused these glaciers?

A: Global warming.

Q: How does global warming cause glaciers?

A: Increases precipitation dramatically. Then moves the belt
of great precipitation much farther north. This causes
rapid buildup of ice sheets, followed by increasingly
rapid and intense glacial rebound.

And here is a recent science article that seems to be confirming what the Cs said above:

Ozone Hole A Surprise Rainmaker


Don't look now, but the climate problem we thought we had already solved -- the ozone hole over Antarctica -- has been rearranging rainfall patterns throughout the Southern Hemisphere for decades, a new modeling analysis shows.

6a00d8341bf67c53ef01538e024904.jpg


he idea that losing ozone in the cold stratosphere over the South Pole could affect weather in the lower atmosphere all the way to the warm equator means Earth's changing climate system is even more complicated than most everyone thought.

The modeling study, published in the recent online issue of the journal Science, revealed that thinning of the ozone layer prompts severe cooling in the lower stratosphere over Antarctica. This cooling causes the lower level troposphere to rise and leads to a poleward shift in a strand of strong winds known as the westerly jet. Moving this jet stream pulls the storm track and other atmospheric circulation features farther south.

In the latter half of the 20th Century, observations tracked the southerly migration of the band of sinking air over the dry Subtropics and the rising air over the Tropics. The changing atmospheric patterns brought more rainfall, especially in summer, to subtropical regions that were previously dry, including eastern Australia.

Using two independent global climate models, the team of U.S. and Canadian researchers successfully replicated these precipitation changes in simulations that isolate the ozone depletion from all other climate conditions, including La Nina as well as heightened greenhouse gas concentrations.

Especially over the southwestern Indian Ocean, eastern Australia, and the southern flank of the Southern Pacific Convergence Zone "our models show that the precipitation response to the ozone hole is unaffected by atmosphere-ocean interactions...and originates almost entirely from ozone depletion in the Southern polar regions," concludes lead author Sarah Kang, a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia Engineering's Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics.

"In both climate models and observations, the subtropical moistening is linked to a poleward shift of the extratropical westerly jet," Kang explains.

Most specialists have been thinking of the depleted ozone layer as a passive component of the system, responsible for filtering out ultraviolet solar radiation which is harmful to humans and other creatures. In calculating the global effects of greenhouse gases on changes in climate, ozone hasn't really been part of the equation.

"This could be a real game-changer," co-author Lorenzo Polvani of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, said in a press release. Discovery of the ozone hole in the 1980s led to widespread concern over the harmful human health impacts of increasing ultraviolet solar radiation. Since 1989, the international treaty known as the Montreal Protocol has banned aerosols containing ozone-eating chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and the ozone hole is slowly on the mend.

"While the ozone hole has been considered as a solved problem, we're now finding it has caused a great deal of the climate change that's been observed," said Polvani. So in the coming decades, the closing of the ozone hole over Antarctica -- while saving humans and other creatures from the harmful cancer-causing UV rays -- will come with its own set of climate changes.
 
Wow, Laura, you always have the most interesting insights! Is there any hope of coordinating this information with the information in the article 'Jet Stream: Is an Ice Age Imminent?' by Pierre Lescaudron from the last issue of Dot Connector? Does this movement of the subtropical moisture band coinciding with the slowing of the jet stream have anything to do with the larger, more frequent and more severe storms in North America this past year?
 

Laurentien2

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
A: Increases precipitation dramatically. Then moves the belt
of great precipitation much farther north. This causes
rapid buildup of ice sheets, followed by increasingly
rapid and intense glacial rebound.

As I understood it, further North was referring for the Northern hemisphere, closer to the north pole. More humidity moving in these region, due to global warming, mean more precipitation i.e. acceleration and augmentation of snow building-up for that region causing a glaciation.

A: Largely, yes. And the world's climate was scarcely any
colder away from the ice sheets than it is today.

Well, how could that be? What caused these glaciers?

A: Global warming.

Q: How does global warming cause glaciers?

What confused me was the term ice sheets which I taught was the polar cap extending much further south causing the glaciation but, you use the word glacier which are not necessary at the pole but forming in high mountain range. Still looking at the graph, I see more precipitation closer to the equator (further north in the southern hemisphere) and how it may effect the glacier in high mountain range in these region but, not sure how it could bring the formation of the ice sheets at the pole either north or south. Unless, this band of precipitation is carried to North by the jet stream which as unusual behavior in the past year.
 
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