Argonauts of the Desert - Wajdenbaum

John G

The Living Force
There was in fact a similar push towards "monotheism" among the Hittites during the late bronze age (in fact, very close to Akhenaten's time) as shown in the attached file (The Hittite king Muatalli adopting the exclusivity of a Luwian god):
Interesting. Luwians could make good Levites.
 

John G

The Living Force
Laura said Reply 13:
"Thing is, the story of Moses is just a duplicate of the story of Abraham and Sarah; many tropes duplicated almost entirely".
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What about this similarity:

Huitzilopochtli, god oh Aztecs led the pilgrimage from the north of the continent or even beyond perhaps to the northwest (Siberia) to reach the promised land where they founded the Great Tenochtitlan in the Anahuac plateau, the so-called city of Mexico.

AND, VERY FAR FROM THAT REGION.

Jehovah / yave, the god of the Israelites guided the pilgrimage from Egypt to Palestine, the promised land.
Tower of Babel/flood myths are in the Americas too. Maybe the promised land concept is an older concept than the fighting over vassals done by Amarna period Egyptians and Hittites. Laura in Horns of Moses has Jacob and Isaac as well as Abraham and Moses with parallel promised land stories.
 

gdpetti

Jedi Council Member
Makes you wonder if these 'Greek' stories came from someplace else.... everyone just keeps passing the stories along? as when all else collapses, the stories are all that remains, right?... I think you said this about myth.
 

Laura

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Makes you wonder if these 'Greek' stories came from someplace else.... everyone just keeps passing the stories along? as when all else collapses, the stories are all that remains, right?... I think you said this about myth.
Yes, close enough. What had me going for a long time was tracking back through the ancient histories as far as I could go until there was no more. That included reading lengthy, tedious, studies of cuneiform tablets...
 

mkrnhr

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While "reading" through a book about Amenhotep 3 (identified by some to be a possible historical prototype for the mythical king Solomon in the OT), I came across an intriguing name, Aper-El:
The author goes in the end to some wild speculations but the discovery is interesting nonetheless.
 
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Laura

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While "reading" through a book about Amenhotep 3 (identified by some to be a possible historical prototype for the mythical king Solomon in the OT), I came across an intriguing name, Aper-El:
The author goes in the end to some wild speculations but the discovery is interesting nonetheless.
Yes, very interesting but highly speculative.

From everything I've read, the story of Joseph in Egypt was a product of the literati of Persian/Hellenic times, but that doesn't preclude some more ancient tale on which it was based.
 
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SlavaOn

Jedi Master
It is axiomatic that "king" is a title.
father.JPG

Could "god" or "God" be also a title, that is given to a human?
Since we still have kings in our midst, could we have also gods walking amongst us?
 

Laura

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It is axiomatic that "king" is a title.
View attachment 31350

Could "god" or "God" be also a title, that is given to a human?
Since we still have kings in our midst, could we have also gods walking amongst us?
Read the article; it explains the common Egyptian usage of the term.
 

SlavaOn

Jedi Master
What I was leading to is how the "title" of God had been granted. A king could have been called a "god" or a "father of the god", but his son is still a king:

31370

- Was it by having implements capable of wholesale slaughter and destruction?
- Was it by performing the magical acts with their sophisticated technologies?
- Was it hereditary by being a progeny of established "Gods"?

Those Kings would not have lasted long enough in humankind's memories to become mythologized as Gods. My take is the longevity should have been the required property to be qualified as a God. Gilgamesh failed to procure it, although he got close. Gilgamesh's example hints that even a human could become a god and it is not an exclusive property of 6D beings.

I read in "Prose Edda" about the apples of Idunn, that allowed Norse Gods to stay immortal. When the said "apples" were taken over by giants, the Gods started aging and they scrambled to get them back... Indra and the company were ingesting Soma juice "of immortality". Avesta tells a similar story.

My question is: where are these Gods today? Are they biding their time waiting for Ragnarök ?
A month ago I have met a man who could have been the god Odin, with an eye patch, taste for poetry and everything :) So, I became curious...
 

Laura

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SlavaOn, you can read Aidan Dodson's books about the 18th dynasty and all those things will become clear, especially how and why the Egyptian king was considered to be a god.

Asking philosophical questions about the assumption of this title is not really appropriate to the thread.
 
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