Daily Life in Ancient Rome - Jerome Carcopino

Nienna

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I wasn't certain that these were real, physical restorations or they were just virtual rebuilds so I looked it up and found this:

Fendi to restore Temple of Venus and Rome

Fendi to fund restoration of Tempio di Venere e Roma.​

Luxury fashion house Fendi is to sponsor the €2.5 million restoration of Rome's Temple of Venus and Roma in the Roman Forum.

Believed to have been the largest temple in ancient Rome, the Tempio di Venere e Roma was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix (Venus the Bringer of Good Fortune) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome).

Its construction began in 121 under Emperor Hadrian and it was completed in 141.

News of the temple's restoration comes as an increasing number of Italian fashion brands step in to restore landmark sites in Rome.

Gucci is to provide €1.6 million for the restoration of Rome's Tarpeian Rock in a two-year project due for completion in 2021.

Shoe company Tod's provided €25 million to restore the Colosseum while Fendi spent €2 million on cleaning and repairing the Trevi Fountain, and recently announced a €280,000 project to clean four well-known Rome fountains.

Luxury jeweller Bulgari donated €1.5 million to clean the Spanish Steps and recently announced plans to restore the sacred area of Largo Argentina.
It was posted on 28, August 2019. So it would seem these places have been physically restored with some very wealthy people paying millions to make it happen.

The reason I wasn't sure is because if you look at the 2nd photo of the before and after pictures of the Temple of Venus and Rome, you'll see the same people in the same positions walking, or standing, in front of the Linea C walkway.
 

bjorn

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The reason I wasn't sure is because if you look at the 2nd photo of the before and after pictures of the Temple of Venus and Rome, you'll see the same people in the same positions walking, or standing, in front of the Linea C walkway.

It's not a real reconstruction, it's a digital reconstruction. Sorry, I was not clear on this. If it was a real reconstruction. It would have cost not millions, but billions. All they have restored is what is still standing.

I don't think they are ever going to restore these old places to their former glory. And maybe that's for the best. Empires rise and fall. This is a reminder of that. It also reminds us to ensure that our civilization doesn't fall either. Although it may be too late for that in the West.

Although Rome never really fell. Many aspects of Christian Rome, her moral compass and ideals. Aspects of her architecture still live on in the West and beyond. Although it is far from perfect and has been under attack tremendously.
 

bjorn

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Baths of Diocletian, how it looked like.

The baths were begun in 298 BC by Emperor Maximian, appointed Augustus of the West by Diocletian, and opened in 306, with an extraordinary extension of almost fourteen hectares. Erected between the Viminale and the Quirinale, the Baths of Diocletian are the largest in Rome and in the Roman world.


Isn't this just the biggest bathhouse the world has ever seen? My goodness. For further information see the website (Italian) dedicated to the digital reconstruction. And below some drawings to give you a better sense of the immense size.

terme-di-diocleziano2.jpg terme-di-diocleziano1.jpg
 
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