Intestinal worms - paradigm shift?

Hello H2O

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Fascinating article. Thanks for posting.

This is pretty typical when you stumble onto something important, and then you come up against the medical and regulatory industry:

The thrill of discovery was initially great, and lab experiments designed to test the new paradigm worked beautifully. But repeated rejections by scientific journals and funding agencies along with sarcastic critiques from anonymous reviewers were the norm for the lab during those early years.
 

stellar

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Fascinating article. Thanks for posting.

This is pretty typical when you stumble onto something important, and then you come up against the medical and regulatory industry:

The thrill of discovery was initially great, and lab experiments designed to test the new paradigm worked beautifully. But repeated rejections by scientific journals and funding agencies along with sarcastic critiques from anonymous reviewers were the norm for the lab during those early years.
If the mainstream is against it, it is likely worth a deeper look; as usual. ;-)
 

nature

Jedi Council Member
Very interesting article
Excellent article! It's incredible, because 6-7 days ago, while reading here and there how people fear microbes and alike, I thought it will help if I write an article with a title something like "why you mustn't fear microbs and bugs".
 

Lys

Padawan Learner
Thank you Deckard, this is interesting, I never heard about "nice gut worms".
This is true that there is a global fear of worms, I'm one of those people who can get easily scared of the idea that those little organisms could be living in my gut.
This article helps surely to relativize.

I wonder if anyone already tried to get Helminths and who is selling them.
 

mamibio74

Padawan Learner
I think there are parasitic elminthes and other good for the intestines. Do you agree with that ? How do you eliminate the bad without hurting the good one ? Does anyone have a good knowledge of this subject ?
 
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Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think there are parasitic elminthes and other good for the intestines. Do you agree with that ? How do you eliminate the bad without hurting the good one ? Does anyone have a good knowledge of this subject ?
This may take years. Official medicine is based on dogma that all critters are bad for you.
 

Hello H2O

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I think there are parasitic elminthes and other good for the intestines. Do you agree with that ? How do you eliminate the bad without hurting the good one ? Does anyone have a good knowledge of this subject ?
I just quickly looked it up, and here is what I found:

From the site: Helminthic Treatment for Crohn’s Disease.


Finding treatment

One major problem for people looking for helminthic treatment is that they will often have to travel outside of the United States to be infected with the worms.
Currently, only one clinic in Tijuana, Mexico, is providing hookworm treatment for Crohn’s disease. However, as more research is done, there may be an increase in the availability of helminthic therapy.
It is unsafe to treat yourself by ordering hookworm or other helminth eggs over the Internet. You should only undergo helminthic therapy under the supervision of a doctor. There are many potential side effects.


When will treatment be available in the United States?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasn’t approved helminth therapy. The FDA has granted Investigational New Drug status to several species of worms, including pig whipworm (Trichuris suis) and human hookworm (Necator americanus).
This means that U.S. researchers are allowed to test the worms in humans. There has been a special interest in the pig whipworm because it can’t live inside the human gut for very long. This might make it a safer option for humans.





 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Doesn’t mention of Rockefeller foundation involvement in eradication of hook worms sound weird?! - I mean they are not exactly philanthropists - putting on my thin foil hat 🤨
 

nature

Jedi Council Member
I think there are parasitic elminthes and other good for the intestines. Do you agree with that ? How do you eliminate the bad without hurting the good one ? Does anyone have a good knowledge of this subject ?
I think the best way is the natural one: having a healthy diet and environment. If you re-introduce good helminths (the helminths alone or the fecal transplantation), they will not survive, as the ones we had when we were baby didn't survived to junk food, abusive antibiotics, environmental toxics, psychic life, etc.
If you have a healthy life (unprocessed food, sun, earthing, etc), you"ll get healthy helminths too. Not only these microscopic worms, but also good bacterias and fungus. Because these micro-organisms are in nature, in soils, in spring water. Did you notice babies who naturally eat earth (unless adults prevent them to), dogs who like rolling around in a puddle of water with mud? But nowadays we can't let babies do so, as soils are polluted: microorganisms became altered, thus pathological.
I don't think there is bad guys, good guys per se in our intestines. i think some microbes became bad because of changes in their DNA by toxics (man-made toxics, especially chemical ones). Without normal proteins on their membranes, how could they be able to properly communicate with our cells? It's become upside down, no more appropriated info, thus chaos.
DNA --> proteins --> communication among cells, and also between cells and microbes.

The other bad guys are
- those created by man (cf spirochete in Lyme disease, HIV, Ebola,...) ie bioweapons.
- those that are new to our planet (brought by meteorites), creating epidemies as black plague.

Even these real bad guys, you can defeat them by strengthening your immunity: good diet again, sun, good mental, etc. Finally, with a healthy lifestyle, you both maintain good guys + get strong immunity.
You can go and get all the "best" medical tratments, all the best alternative medicine like probiotics, vitamins, it will be without or little effect if you don't parallaly change diet, psychism, etc.
 
Did you notice babies who naturally eat earth (unless adults prevent them to), dogs who like rolling around in a puddle of water with mud?
I remember eating dirt as a small child. Playing out in the yard led to all kinds of fun! And evidently it helped me with a strong immune system. Whenever my mother thought we had worms, she would dose us with some kind of liquid remedy. Don't know what it was but maybe black walnut. We were a poor family and lived out in the country.

My current dog loves rolling around in dirt or muddy puddles, and I have been trying to get rid of her worms (naturally with DE, pumpkin seeds, homeo), but I am still seeing worms in her poop (maybe from eggs in the dirt). (Previously, I had used Panacur, but wanted to try a natural route this time.) She is not sick and has energy. Do you think this article has any application for dogs? Can worms be "good" for dogs? As long as she is expelling them, I am guessing her system is working correctly?
 

Jones

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I remember eating dirt as a small child. Playing out in the yard led to all kinds of fun! And evidently it helped me with a strong immune system. Whenever my mother thought we had worms, she would dose us with some kind of liquid remedy. Don't know what it was but maybe black walnut. We were a poor family and lived out in the country.

My current dog loves rolling around in dirt or muddy puddles, and I have been trying to get rid of her worms (naturally with DE, pumpkin seeds, homeo), but I am still seeing worms in her poop (maybe from eggs in the dirt). (Previously, I had used Panacur, but wanted to try a natural route this time.) She is not sick and has energy. Do you think this article has any application for dogs? Can worms be "good" for dogs? As long as she is expelling them, I am guessing her system is working correctly?
It's been quite some time since I read the following book and I don't have a copy to hand, but if I remember correctly (and that's a big if because it has been over a decade since I read it!) the author makes the point that a slight worm burden is good for dogs because it helps deal with toxins in the system. Worm burdens only become a problem if the population gets too high when the dog is struggling with other health issues. Of course that's not a reason to ignore worms and the population probably should be managed, but nuking them with harmful chemicals probably isn't the best answer.

 
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