"Life Without Bread"

Mariama

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truth seeker said:
liffy said:
Personally I can handle higher carbohydrate loads, even after doing the low carb thing for quite a while, but as you say, there seems to be a lot of people having issues with pretty much anything other than animal food.
The thing is, there are a few people who have said the same thing but one really can't be sure unless they get rid of them completely and then retest each food separately. For years, I thought that I could eat anything and did with little repercussions. As it turns out, I can no longer do that.

The same goes for me and my eldest son. After a couple of months we had some nuts and my son had some quinoa and we both suffered from bouts of diarrhea. I had some nasty cramps to go with it.
I can't seem to find any wild rice nor quinoa over here that is not packaged in the same facility together with grains, soy and so on. As my kids need more carbohydrates I have decided to make some bread with gluten free buckwheat flour. The buckwheat flour that we used beforehand was also probably contaminated with gluten. Sigh.

TS said:
Well, at this point, I actually see it as an advantage to only being able to eat a few foods. In a way it's freeing - I'm getting rid of programs related to food. It's also cheaper - while everyone's rushing out to get their carb fix (which also makes one hungrier), I'm satisfied and not focused on eating or recipes. Food is simply nourishment. This definitely helps free up one's time to do other things.

It does free up one's time and I love that! Yesterday afternoon I had some sardines and I felt still hungry. I didn't eat anything else afterwards and the hunger just vanished. So it must have been a program?

TS said:
Also, and take this with a huge grain of salt, but I've been wondering over the last week or so (especially in light of the new research), if the path we're on - sto which doesn't feed off, but feeds others - might mean in part that we may be heading towards a state where we eat less and less. This would certainly come in handy in a food shortage!

It would come in handy during food shortages. And I have two kids to feed, so they can have the food that is left. I used to be quite a gobbler. :shock: That really seems to be changing now.
 

Paragon

Jedi Council Member
Thanks for that post Gonzo. I was quite tearful when I watched that documentary about the tribe and the runner paying tribute to the life of the animal that he had hunted for 8 hours. Seems respectful and 'right', to be able to connect to nature like that.

Contrast that today with the over population of earth and the greed with which the majority consume food, it does seem that fasting and the ketogenic diet is the 'physical' side of activating our DNA beneficially for the transition. OSIT from the new data available.

I imagine that if I ever had to hunt in the near future with whatever it may bring, then I would pay respect in this way, perhaps to the DCM for the opportunity to take a life to continue my own. To lessen the suffering by taking only what you need and no more - seems like an STO concept.
 

Voyageur

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[quote author=LQB ]
I think jars of bacon fat might just be the optimum food to stock for lean times.
[/quote]

Have been saving fat for a year now into glass containers in the freezer and then at intervals thaw, strainer through cheesecloth into cone type mold and freeze again for final storage. When cooking, it is very easy to then pull a small cone of fat out to utilize in preparations.
 

Carl

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FOTCM Member
Paragon said:
Thanks for that post Gonzo. I was quite tearful when I watched that documentary about the tribe and the runner paying tribute to the life of the animal that he had hunted for 8 hours. Seems respectful and 'right', to be able to connect to nature like that.

Contrast that today with the over population of earth and the greed with which the majority consume food, it does seem that fasting and the ketogenic diet is the 'physical' side of activating our DNA beneficially for the transition. OSIT from the new data available.

I imagine that if I ever had to hunt in the near future with whatever it may bring, then I would pay respect in this way, perhaps to the DCM for the opportunity to take a life to continue my own. To lessen the suffering by taking only what you need and no more - seems like an STO concept.

I had the same reaction, its surely the most graceful way of being STS. Fascinating documentary!
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
voyageur said:
[quote author=LQB ]
I think jars of bacon fat might just be the optimum food to stock for lean times.

Have been saving fat for a year now into glass containers in the freezer and then at intervals thaw, strainer through cheesecloth into cone type mold and freeze again for final storage. When cooking, it is very easy to then pull a small cone of fat out to utilize in preparations.
[/quote]

Sounds like a good idea - small amounts pre-frozen for easy use. I've been experimenting with the storage of the fat in jars in the pantry. It grows no mold or bacteria so long as you have not used it to cook any other food. I think it will keep this way indefinitely. I think there was a recent sott article about a canned jar of lard that tested out OK after 60-some years.
 

Laura

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Just a note that we can fat that we render from the half pigs we buy. Just render it, pour it in jars, put on the seals and lids, hand tighten, and process about 25 minutes. They can be stored in a cool, dark place probably about indefinitely.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
Laura said:
Just a note that we can fat that we render from the half pigs we buy. Just render it, pour it in jars, put on the seals and lids, hand tighten, and process about 25 minutes. They can be stored in a cool, dark place probably about indefinitely.

Sorry if the answer to this is obvious, but what do you mean by processing the jars for 25 minutes, Laura? Is this boiling them, or in the pressure canner? Does a vacuum seal form?
 

Cosmos

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Foxx said:
Laura said:
Just a note that we can fat that we render from the half pigs we buy. Just render it, pour it in jars, put on the seals and lids, hand tighten, and process about 25 minutes. They can be stored in a cool, dark place probably about indefinitely.

Sorry if the answer to this is obvious, but what do you mean by processing the jars for 25 minutes, Laura? Is this boiling them, or in the pressure canner? Does a vacuum seal form?

hello Foxx this thread might answer some of your questions:
http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,28712.msg360048.html#msg360048
 

Avala

Dagobah Resident
Laura said:
Just a note that we can fat that we render from the half pigs we buy. Just render it, pour it in jars, put on the seals and lids, hand tighten, and process about 25 minutes. They can be stored in a cool, dark place probably about indefinitely.

How do you "render" it? Do you melting it? If you melt it and make grease of it, it really can be stored for years (if not stored in light or too warm environment). No need for more processing.
We are using it in that way, for cooking, frying, whatever. You can also eat it it alone.

This:

klanje_2010_011_1.sflb.ashx
 

Chrissy

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I've been looking into the idea of reusing bones to make many batches of broth. I was making one batch and then throwing out the bones, thinking when they turn soft, the nutrients were extracted. I came across this woman's recipe for "perpetual soup" where she basically cooks her bones continuously on low in her crock pot for an entire week. When she removes broth, she adds more water.

_http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/

The convenience of this certainly appealed to me, but I'm questioning the nutritional value of the broth by the end of the week. I know there are many experienced broth makers here, so I'm wondering if you reuse the bones?
 

truth seeker

The Living Force
Chrissy said:
I've been looking into the idea of reusing bones to make many batches of broth. I was making one batch and then throwing out the bones, thinking when they turn soft, the nutrients were extracted. I came across this woman's recipe for "perpetual soup" where she basically cooks her bones continuously on low in her crock pot for an entire week. When she removes broth, she adds more water.

_http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/

The convenience of this certainly appealed to me, but I'm questioning the nutritional value of the broth by the end of the week. I know there are many experienced broth makers here, so I'm wondering if you reuse the bones?
I've done a version of the above myself (usually only two boils). I would think that the nutritional value would decrease because the consistency and nutritional value (which is determined by the gelatinous texture) of the broth changes - it's more watery. Usually when I boil it twice, it's because I didn't cook it long enough the first time and so it seems to require a second boiling. Others may have more to add, though.

Oh, I've also done multiple boils if I've added new bones to the 'older' ones in the pot - not more than 3 times.
 

Odyssey

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truth seeker said:
Chrissy said:
I've been looking into the idea of reusing bones to make many batches of broth. I was making one batch and then throwing out the bones, thinking when they turn soft, the nutrients were extracted. I came across this woman's recipe for "perpetual soup" where she basically cooks her bones continuously on low in her crock pot for an entire week. When she removes broth, she adds more water.

_http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/

The convenience of this certainly appealed to me, but I'm questioning the nutritional value of the broth by the end of the week. I know there are many experienced broth makers here, so I'm wondering if you reuse the bones?
I've done a version of the above myself (usually only two boils). I would think that the nutritional value would decrease because the consistency and nutritional value (which is determined by the gelatinous texture) of the broth changes - it's more watery. Usually when I boil it twice, it's because I didn't cook it long enough the first time and so it seems to require a second boiling. Others may have more to add, though.

Oh, I've also done multiple boils if I've added new bones to the 'older' ones in the pot - not more than 3 times.

Same here. I only use the bones twice. I dont count reheating the pot for leftovers though.
 

Galaxia2002

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FOTCM Member
I need some advices here. I am not doing well with the low carb diet. I was not in ketosis because I was not able to low my carbs enough because I have loosing much weight and I am naturally skinny. I tried to eat more fat (as recommend life without bread, and inspired by the testimony of the skinny man in the book and what I read here too) until a max of 50 g/meal, no more than that because I get diarrhea. Here is difficult to buy meat with fat so I had to buy lard and made a "chocolate" (a mix of lard, cocoa, xylitol) to complement the meal. Here does not exist "grass fed" because the meat is imported form who knows where, so I complement with a lot of omega 3 oils. And cooked with a lot of ghee.
Let me describe myself a bit. I have been always skinny and years ago I gained some weight and muscle with a traditional high carbohydrate diet, and some weightlifting, that was the only way to put on weight. But almost 1 1/2 -2 years ago I started to change my diet. Included more fat and get down carbs until about 70 -80 g/day, low fiber/few veggies. I was feel just "normal" but the good think is that I never got a cold again, and some pains from inflammation disappeared. I was not hungry hours after the meal and have no cravings, either now. This suggested that I was not insulin Insensitive but lost 6 kg which was fatal to me, I have weakness in my legs and lost much muscular mass even eating enough protein.
I eat for breakfast, eggs, bacon, cassava, and sardines but I suspect this last don't made me good because my colon get inflammed (I recently read about it produces histamine) so I cut it up. But I suspect also about a meat that was stitched but was not in good condition. All my family eat it and started feel bad, some get diarrhea, not me, but I started to fells some discomfort in my colon.
After three weekends, I am still inflamed, but I have to cut back fat and arise carbs again to gain some weight. (I only eat "safes carbs" .The fat seems to do few in terms of weight in my body, are the carbs what dominates my weight. I am constipated too, typical sign of IBS. 8 years ago I suffered IBS for a short time. The thing is that even eating more carbs I am not gaining weight and that worried me. It seems to me that the time with the high fat/ low carb accelerates so much my metabolism. I also think that smoking could have to do with it. (I am smoking from 1 1/2 years ago)
I went to the doctor because the IBS and you now traditional doctors said "no fat at all, not fiber while inflammed" but I just reduced the fat. She prescribed me pinaverium bromide or trimebutin to regulate gut motility and enzymes. Pitifully the health insurance from my job take holidays with the university and only attends emergencies. The physician said that when they return to activities a gastroenterologyst will check me and they will do a colonoscopy, and check the thyroid gland.
I suspect that maybe is a genetic problem because half of my family is Italian and you know they eat pasta every single day. I was raised with pasta too and maybe the damage is deep to be reversed.
I am feeling better from IBS taking bromelain enzymes and probiotics with acupuncture but what worried me more is my weight problem. I am 1,79 mts tall, and weight 60 kg. My body fat % is = 8,3. Actually even eating more carbs I don't feel cravings but I don't want return to a very high carb diet as I was before (I am totally aware of the damage of high carb diets). I don't now if the IBS made food assimilation difficult and that's the reason I can gain weight for the moment.
There is another thing that I noted. Although I eat much meat now than before I don't like the meat odor when is not cooked (specially chicken) and I feel disgust to see some animal viscera in the supermarket. I was never vegetarian but It sounds as I have some program running inside me.
So I need to take that tests, maybe that shed light in what is happening.
 

mb

The Living Force
Galaxia2002 said:
I need some advices here...

Have you done a thorough elimination/challenge test to rule out food sensitivities/allergies? If so, you might need to look at the "safe" foods you didn't eliminate. It's taken me 2 years to work this out, and I am not quite done yet.

While I am not looking for TMI, could you be more specific about what you are referring to as IBS?

When you change your diet, you also change the diet of your gut microbiota. Sometimes they don't like the change, and they make you miserable. Or they like it too much, and make you miserable.

If you are experiencing excessive fermentation, you may want to try a low-FODMAP diet (search for the information earlier in this topic). The bacteria produce waste products ("endotoxin"; particularly LPS) and too much fermentation can mean too much waste for your system to handle. Another possibility is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), which is said to help with SIBO (small intestine bacterial growth), but personally I would want to verify SIBO with testing before going to that much trouble.

When you lower carb intake sharply, it is likely that you will lose some water weight. This is not muscle mass/organ loss. It should not continue, however, if you are eating enough protein (the US RDA is 0.8g/kg/day).

You might want to calculate your calorie consumption to see if it is reasonable for your body size. While calories-in, calories-out is not an accurate model for how bodies regulate themselves, it does apply from a thermodynamic perspective, to the extent that the calories are actually metabolized. Make sure you are consuming sufficient "fuel."
 

Galaxia2002

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FOTCM Member
Megan said:
Galaxia2002 said:
I need some advices here...

Have you done a thorough elimination/challenge test to rule out food sensitivities/allergies? If so, you might need to look at the "safe" foods you didn't eliminate. It's taken me 2 years to work this out, and I am not quite done yet.

Thanks for the reply Megan. I need to do a lot of work on this too. I did a kind of elimination diet some time ago. I am sensitive to diary, curry, beans, pepper, cabbage, but I give the sardines for sure and it was not so. Is there an elimination paleo diet or something like that? because I remembered that the one we do here was the Ultra simple diet that had a lot of veggies and not sit well to many people.

While I am not looking for TMI, could you be more specific about what you are referring to as IBS?

IBS = Irritable Bowel syndrome. It seems to be a emotional component and I believe it is true in my case, because it started in the most stressful week of the year.

When you change your diet, you also change the diet of your gut microbiota. Sometimes they don't like the change, and they make you miserable. Or they like it too much, and make you miserable.

If you are experiencing excessive fermentation, you may want to try a low-FODMAP diet (search for the information earlier in this topic). The bacteria produce waste products ("endotoxin"; particularly LPS) and too much fermentation can mean too much waste for your system to handle. Another possibility is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), which is said to help with SIBO (small intestine bacterial growth), but personally I would want to verify SIBO with testing before going to that much trouble.

When you lower carb intake sharply, it is likely that you will lose some water weight. This is not muscle mass/organ loss. It should not continue, however, if you are eating enough protein (the US RDA is 0.8g/kg/day).

I don't think I lower the carbs sharply, it last months. I lost the 6 Kg in 1 1/2 year

You might want to calculate your calorie consumption to see if it is reasonable for your body size. While calories-in, calories-out is not an accurate model for how bodies regulate themselves, it does apply from a thermodynamic perspective, to the extent that the calories are actually metabolized. Make sure you are consuming sufficient "fuel."

This is another problem, I feel satiated with relatively few food compared with persons I know. So I believe I need to force myself to eat more. What I don't know is what ratio fat/carb keep
 
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