Body by Science / HIIT Experiment

Ennio

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I've been doing the the HIT exercises for the past few weeks and intend to continue with them. I had already been exercising a couple of times a week doing a version of this regimen that was designed to help one 'feel the burn' and promote mitchondrial stimulation/growth, so the transition hasn't been difficult even if I'm now working a little harder at it!

Being fit, ie. able to lift relatively heavy things, doing physical work, etc. gives me a feeling of accomplishment and efficiency that is wholly different from doing other things, and seems to be an important part of being embodied as we are. We're already working to develop our minds and emotions as much as possible - why not our bodies too to some good degree? And the nice thing about exercise also is that it definitely helps positively stimulate the mind and emotions as well, in my experience. A twofer.
 

luc

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Can anyone tell me, what kind of things or equipment I need for start?
If you want to do the free-weight version of the exercises at home, you need at least a barbell and a set of weights. Depending on your strength of course, I would recommend getting something like 2x10kg, 4x5kg, 2x2,5kg and possibly 2x1,5kg. If you are already in good shape, you may need more.

You are supposed to use a bench press as well, but you can also substitute this exercise with sloooow push-ups, possibly putting a weight on your back while doing it (I use a 5kg weight; it probably shouldn't be too heavy so that you don't injure your back). Works like a charm for me.

Keep in mind that for the 1st exercise (bent-over barbell row) and the 3rd exercise (deadlift), you need much more weight than for the 2nd (standing overhead press). I currently use 20kg on each side for the 1st and for the 3rd (still experimenting with the deadlift), and 7,5kg on each side for the 2nd.
 

c.a.

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If you want to do the free-weight version of the exercises at home, you need at least a barbell and a set of weights. Depending on your strength of course, I would recommend getting something like 2x10kg, 4x5kg, 2x2,5kg and possibly 2x1,5kg. If you are already in good shape, you may need more.

You are supposed to use a bench press as well, but you can also substitute this exercise with sloooow push-ups, possibly putting a weight on your back while doing it (I use a 5kg weight; it probably shouldn't be too heavy so that you don't injure your back). Works like a charm for me.

Keep in mind that for the 1st exercise (bent-over barbell row) and the 3rd exercise (deadlift), you need much more weight than for the 2nd (standing overhead press). I currently use 20kg on each side for the 1st and for the 3rd (still experimenting with the deadlift), and 7,5kg on each side for the 2nd.
Agree, that it doesn't take that much equipment to get the results that you are seeking.

Like luc stated, that a basic set (with the necessary components), can be had (and relatively inexpensive), at just about at any large volume super store, (Traget, Wall Mart etc).

Also the used market may even be an option for the machines or stations if you have the inclination to go full throttle.
 

Alana

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I found this website:

The Big-Five Workout Program

that gives a good description of the exercise program and how to perform the exercises correctly on machines. It also has a 10 min video with McGuff himself doing the exercises:


We don't have the equipment that he has of course, but it is interesting to watch the intensity and the slowness with which he performs each exercise, and how his aids help him along.

I too found that having a friend to perform the exercises with is very helpful, not only in practical terms (keeping time, catching the free-weights when I can't hold them anymore, etc) but also for support and making sure that the exercises are done correctly and that I push myself to my limits.
 

Laura

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fabric

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Like luc stated, that a basic set (with the necessary components), can be had (and relatively inexpensive), at just about at any large volume super store, (Traget, Wall Mart etc).
A decent set of weights will prob run about $1/lbs. If you're tight for space, something like this is ideal. But if you can spare it (space/cost) getting a barbell as well is better.

I used to have a set like those in the link, and was able to do full body workouts with them. There are some advantages/disadvantages, where in some exercises (like in an overhead press) one arm is slightly stronger than the other, so it might take a bit of extra work. Although I preferred that since it would activate more muscles and eventually was able to work to 'equalize' both of them. With a barbell, it's a little easier to control, but you won't activate as many of the supporting muscles as with dumbbells. But it is very good for exercises like the deadlift.

Another thing to consider with with some of those sets, the smallest weight included would be a 5lbs weight. A 5lbs (each side, which works out to 10lbs) is a huge increase when adding weight. For those looking to make progressive gains, having a 2.5lbs or 1.25lbs plate is really handy. You tack on a bit of weight each work out, and after a few weeks they start to add up. And you'll end up like this guy in no time! ;-D


 

Prodigal Son

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...

... I'll definitely say that there's really something to be said about having someone coach and encourage you. Before I would workout by myself and I could reach really high levels of intensity and muscle failure, but I'm finding that having someone there with me makes me more willing to dig even deeper. So if y'all can I would recommend finding a workout partner to remind you to keep good form and encourage you to push past the discomfort and reach true muscle failure.

... Talk about efficient and effective! I also experience "limp" limbs for a few hours, and a deep muscle fatigue lasts for 3 or 4 days. Which is interesting because the deep muscle fatigue I experienced before going to the studio would only last a day or two.

I highly encourage everyone to read BBS, because it really explains everything about exercise in a clear way that can be adapted for whatever equipment (or lack thereof) that might be available to you. It also gives you the knowledge to cut through a lot of mainstream exercise nonsense.

....
This is what I found too. Having an encouraging coach there, and assisting with the final rep really does help you push through and reach true muscle failure.
After my 4th session, the previous feelings of deep muscle fatigue are less noticeable too.
 

c.a.

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This is what I found too. Having an encouraging coach there, and assisting with the final rep really does help you push through and reach true muscle failure.
After my 4th session, the previous feelings of deep muscle fatigue are less noticeable too.
Good you brought this up Prodigal Son.

When doing my wheelbarrow activity I could tell I was at the point that I needed to stop. Thinking and feeling that I was nearing a possibility of injuring myself (on the third day at that time with a 2 hour session, again even with interment rest stops).

I think that there is a fine line in recognizing what the difference is, and what may be a safe approach with concept of true muscle failure.

Muscle Fatigue vs Muscle Failure: What’s the Difference?
https://cathe.com/muscle-fatigue-vs-muscle-failure-whats-difference/
Key Points:
What It Means to Train to Failure
The Concept of Muscle Fatigue
Which Approach is Better?
Should You Train to Failure?
Establish a Baseline Level of Strength First
The Bottom Line
 

Scottie

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that gives a good description of the exercise program and how to perform the exercises correctly on machines. It also has a 10 min video with McGuff himself doing the exercises:
Interesting that the book says to achieve total muscle failure in 45-90s, but in the vid, McGuff is going over 90 seconds on most exercises. The book also says to rest 30-60 seconds between exercises, but he's not resting at all.

I read somewhere that McGuff said his publisher "tweaked" certain things, and the "12-minute workout" was total marketing. So, I guess if you want to be as Buff as McGuff, you can do the more hardcore version. ;-D

For now, I'm finding the book version to be hard enough as it is!!
 

luc

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Interesting that the book says to achieve total muscle failure in 45-90s, but in the vid, McGuff is going over 90 seconds on most exercises. The book also says to rest 30-60 seconds between exercises, but he's not resting at all.
Yeah, I go above 60s sometimes as well, depends on the weight of course. I don't think it really matters that much as long as you stay in the general range (i.e. a minute or so as opposed to a couple of minutes). I think in the book he says (or maybe I read it somewhere else) that a rest period about as long as you need to change weights on a barbell (if you're doing the free-weight version) is OK. Depends on how fast you manage that :-)

There's an interesting blog post about one guy's experience here, and he says in the comments the 60s seemed a bit too short for him.
 

Zadius Sky

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I have a gym membership for couple of years and had a couple of HIIT classes (which were an hour-long workout with no rest). However, I haven't been going to the gym for a very long time - I just simply don't have the time.

I just ordered the book and looking forward to the BBS workout.
 

A Jay

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And here's a vertical leg press that looks to me like it could be a model for something that could be easily built.
https://www.amazon.com/Powerline-PVLP156X-Vertical-Leg-Press/dp/B000UZJJMA/ref=sr_1_4
Nice find Laura! Looks like it would be easy enough to replicate and would give peeps a safer and possibly more effective alternative to regular weighted or one-legged squats.

I think that there is a fine line in recognizing what the difference is, and what may be a safe approach with concept of true muscle failure.
Doing things like moving heavy wheelbarrows uphill with the intention of going to muscle failure is not a good idea. The closer you get to muscle failure, the more likely you are to get injured. This is a big reason why slow reps and machines are recommended. It's the safest way to train.

Interesting that the book says to achieve total muscle failure in 45-90s, but in the vid, McGuff is going over 90 seconds on most exercises. The book also says to rest 30-60 seconds between exercises, but he's not resting at all.

I read somewhere that McGuff said his publisher "tweaked" certain things, and the "12-minute workout" was total marketing. So, I guess if you want to be as Buff as McGuff, you can do the more hardcore version. ;-D
The lack of rest is for improved metabolic (what many refer to as 'cardiovascular') conditioning, and that was something that Arthur Jones was big on. Moving as quickly as possible from one exercise to the next for the conditioning benefits. This way you're really maximizing the benefits of each workout and minimizing the time it takes to do.
 

ScioAgapeOmnis

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Interesting that the book says to achieve total muscle failure in 45-90s, but in the vid, McGuff is going over 90 seconds on most exercises. The book also says to rest 30-60 seconds between exercises, but he's not resting at all.

I read somewhere that McGuff said his publisher "tweaked" certain things, and the "12-minute workout" was total marketing. So, I guess if you want to be as Buff as McGuff, you can do the more hardcore version. ;-D

For now, I'm finding the book version to be hard enough as it is!!
From a muscle standpoint it's perfectly fine since pushing and pulling uses totally different muscles and no break is technically needed. But these are very intense sets so that changes that whole enchilada. You gotta consider his conditioning - after doing a set like that, most mere mortals will need to pick their willpower from the floor, catch their breath, let the central nervous system find its home address again, and do a full blood panel to make sure you don't need to write down a cause of death just yet, etc. I think it's individual in this case - when you feel you can bring 100% effort to the next set, go for it!

Also an interesting tidbit - recent studies have shown that it doesn't matter what weight you are using - failure is the great equalizer. As long as you go to failure, you can do a set that takes you there in 5 reps or 30 reps and you'll sufficiently work your muscles. In other words, "how many reps per set should I do" is completely irrelevant. A hard set is a hard set. It's because of the size principle of muscle fiber recruitment. Your body recruits increasingly more fast-twitch fibers as you approach failure, and light weights just make that happen later in the set than heavy weights. At or near failure, your muscles perceive great difficulty and to them it doesn't matter if the weight is actually really heavy from the start or just feels heavy because you're near failure.

There's been some interesting developments based on that - for example something called myo-reps. We're talking about people who do multiple sets per muscle group here, which is different from BBS approach. But all it does is have you wait maybe 5-10 seconds between sets of the same exercise. The idea is that since fast twitch fibers are the ones with the most potential for growth and strength development, it's only the last part of the set that is truly "productive". So if you wait too long between sets, your slow twitch fibers get recovered, and the next set would have to exhaust them again before fast-twitch get engaged (unless you're doing heavy weights like 5 rep maxes then it's a moot point).

So you wait only a bit - just enough for fast twitch fibers to recover, then do another set which is productive from the start. This works best for relatively lighter sets of 10 rep max or above. So for those interested in doing a more traditional routine, you can try keeping your rest times between sets short (5 breaths and go again). It isn't 10 minutes a week short, but it will dramatically shorten the time of your workout if you do multiple sets per exercise. It's just another efficiency maximizer to keep in mind.

As a side note, myo-reps are actually also designed to naturally simulate the effect of something called "occlusion training", which is when people tie a rubber band (on their arms or whatever) to curb blood supply to the muscle you're training, and for several metabolic reasons, this has an almost steroid-like effect on muscle development by curbing metabolites that would otherwise interfere. Short rest periods and constant tension during the workout simulate that weird effect.
 
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Goemon_

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I have read the book in October 2016.
I do the Fee-Weight Big five

I wasn't comfortable doing a session a week.
I ended doing 2 sessions a month during 4 months
then 1 session a month for 3 months
Then, 5 months without session...
2 months with 1 session a month.
Another 5 months break...

And finally I decided I should force myself to do 1 session per week.
At that time my goal was to make 12 sessions, then go to see my Etiopath and then do at list another 12 sessions.
I ended doing 11 sessions and last week I didn't do the 12th session. I will most certainly get back to it this week.

Here is a video of me during a session. Watching the video made me notice that I wasn't doing all the exercises the right way.
 
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