chess- a psycopathic game?

Luks

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Chess contains idea of rivalisation, what may leads to the psychopathy, however rivalisation in the chess leads to the fighting over who is able to focus better, make better analysis etc.

Chess in fact has simply structures of the algoritms which we can put into the computer in the form of code. Computer checks all the possibly situation which can has place on the chessboard and choose the one the most adequate move to win the game.

All is clear, there is no mysteries on the chessboard, everything could be calculated and will win that one who will not make mistake or make the less mistakes than the opponent. If we will be computers we will not have the problems with that, but we are humans we can be distracted, miss something, act too fast without enough analisys.

I like chess, I play a bit this is opportunity to train analytic mind (also intuition and precognition skills which fill the gap of the not perfect conscious mind and brain), hovewer it is just a game and very seductive game. It allows to develop skills desirable for scientific mind, but always chess will be a game and it is worth to learn maths or programming or something similar. Enjoying chess may be a sign of the predisposition to the sciences.

This is my view on chess.
 

Mikey

The Living Force
Chess contains idea of rivalisation, what may leads to the psychopathy
Rivalry is the opposition of competing parties, and in that sense a majority, if not all, of games fall in that category. I think it's exaggerated that chess (or games in general, in the sense of structured form of play) lead to psychopathy.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Rivalry is the opposition of competing parties, and in that sense a majority, if not all, of games fall in that category. I think it's exaggerated that chess (or games in general, in the sense of structured form of play) lead to psychpathy.
How so Mickey? In this density is not close by saying that to avoid the trap one learns from those that set the tarps.
 

Mikey

The Living Force
How so Mickey?
Competitive games train cooperation, negotiation and learning. In chess, or any other game, people decide to get together, set up rules and roles to which they agree to adhere, and then they play and learn from each other. And probably they will have fun otherwise they wouldn't play. And if someone is a bad player by not sticking to the rules, people will certainly not continue playing with them. Plus, nobody forces anyone to play chess.

In this density is not close by saying that to avoid the trap one learns from those that set the tarps.
Probably close, but how does that relate to chess?
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Competitive games train cooperation, negotiation and learning. In chess, or any other game, people decide to get together, set up rules and roles to which they agree to adhere, and then they play and learn from each other. And probably they will have fun otherwise they wouldn't play. And if someone is a bad player by not sticking to the rules, people will certainly not continue playing with them. Plus, nobody forces anyone to play chess.
Probably close, but how does that relate to chess?
I remember that something that always kind of blew my away was that if and when we graduate (via 4DSTO), there will still be an interaction with with the 4dsts. But as the session's say on more level playing field.

Life is like a chess game. I would play for sport not for the ego. When I won I celebrated as when I lost. As it all was all about the lesson.

I remember learning about the positive aspects of what the game offered. Though some time's there were machine reactions. Never did I sweep a broad of its pieces after being beaten, as far back as i can recall.

Imho it's just one of a gazillion ways of see one's self and make corrections for a better life.
 

Ursus Minor

Jedi Council Member
Chess contains idea of rivalisation, what may leads to the psychopathy, however rivalisation in the chess leads to the fighting over who is able to focus better, make better analysis etc.

Chess in fact has simply structures of the algoritms which we can put into the computer in the form of code. Computer checks all the possibly situation which can has place on the chessboard and choose the one the most adequate move to win the game.

All is clear, there is no mysteries on the chessboard, everything could be calculated and will win that one who will not make mistake or make the less mistakes than the opponent. If we will be computers we will not have the problems with that, but we are humans we can be distracted, miss something, act too fast without enough analisys.

I like chess, I play a bit this is opportunity to train analytic mind (also intuition and precognition skills which fill the gap of the not perfect conscious mind and brain), hovewer it is just a game and very seductive game. It allows to develop skills desirable for scientific mind, but always chess will be a game and it is worth to learn maths or programming or something similar. Enjoying chess may be a sign of the predisposition to the sciences.

This is my view on chess.
I remember the C's saying that "STO does not play chess."

Chess is about taking over, invading and "destroying" your opponent and that would be the opposite of what STO is.

But while STO does not play chess we may, because we're STS.
But I have got to say that I have lost interest in playing chess, for whatever reason.

Psychopathy leads to rivalisation, but does rivalisation lead to psychopathy?

Playing chess may actually provide you with capabilities like concentration, staying focussed, strategic planning and awareness ("Always expect attack!") that should be useful on our STS playing field.
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Not very psychopathic methinks :-) Russian chess coach makes social media appeal, sells phone to take 6yo prodigy to world championship

Six-year-old Misha will be one of the youngest contestants at the upcoming world school chess tournament in Albania. To get there, his coach not only had to sell some of his possessions, but also called on social media for help.

Chess has been a passion for 26-year-old Roman Artamonov since childhood. He learned the game himself, before opening a school to share his experience with youngsters in the Russian city of Perm. First he taught lessons at his apartment, and he then opened a full-fledged chess school.

Mikhail Gurishov, or simply Misha, became Artamonov’s student purely by chance. His father initially took the boy’s elder sister to chess lessons, and once took along his then four-year-old son. Misha showed immediate interest in the chess board, trying to place pieces on it. Soon the boy started attending the school himself and became a better player than his father and sister, and eventually won multiple prizes at competitions in Russia.

The pair came to Moscow for just one day, before leaving for the big chess event in Albania – the FIDE World Schools Chess Championships – that takes place from April 20 to 29. Misha will be one of the youngest participants of the tournament but has every chance of beating older rivals in his category, according to his coach.

The trip to Albania would not have happened at all had it not been for Artamonov’s efforts. A hefty sum – some 180,000 rubles (almost $3,000) – was required to fund the trip to the championship. The coach did not hesitate to sell his own cell phone to get part of the money, and also organized a charity chess tournament in Perm.

In addition, Artamonov turned to the power of social media, asking users for donations. In just two days a number of passionate people, including relatives of those who had lost against the youngster at domestic competitions, transferred enough money – and the way to the world tournament was finally open. (...)
 

Nem

Padawan Learner
Chess is a perfect information game. There is no randomness involved, you and your opponent see the same fully visible board state. Generally speaking the player who is more objective and sees what is 'behind the scenes' in a chess position should be victorious, as any traps, tricks or winning tactical combinations only work if a player is unaware of them or somewhat allowed them to exist.

Basically, if you lose a chess game, the fault is only yours. This is a tremendous realization especially for young kids who learn the game, because in order to improve and be a better player, you need to learn from your thinking blunders and poor conclusions. Learning how to face defeat in a proper way is crucial. This is a useful skill that translates to real life situations as well.

The game can also learn mental endurance, as it requires you to be focused and concentrated and being emotional often clouds your judgment. One bad move can turn a winning position into a lost one and you can't make a takeback. The idea that you commit a move can teach responsibility for your decisions and reaping its consequences.

Of course, chess being a game can have its disadvantages too. For example, you can dissociate too much into it and lose sight of more important things. There are cases of chess players that went mad, ie. Paul Morphy or Bobby Fisher (as do some think he went mad)

To sum it up, chess can be a fun, social, life-long hobby. Despite being incapable as humans of being as strong as computers (which calculate like 20+ moves ahead) several million of people do casually play chess and the professional and competitive scene is quite healthy as well.


There can be much more said about chess but that's 3cents from a chess player.


All Best,
Nem
 

Mikey

The Living Force
Also note that forum mumber "clerck de bonk" titled this thread "chess- a psycopathic game?" apparently only because he read an article saying that jews are successful in chess. This is a far fetched, insulting, and irresponsible connection to make: pattern recognition run amok. It is also irresponsible to superficially pull some of the C's specific and context-dependent remarks to support this conjecture.
 

clerck de bonk

Dagobah Resident
Also note that forum mumber "clerck de bonk" titled this thread "chess- a psycopathic game?" apparently only because he read an article saying that jews are successful in chess. This is a far fetched, insulting, and irresponsible connection to make: pattern recognition run amok. It is also irresponsible to superficially pull some of the C's specific and context-dependent remarks to support this conjecture.
It was a question, I was corrected.
 

Luks

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Rivalry is the opposition of competing parties, and in that sense a majority, if not all, of games fall in that category. I think it's exaggerated that chess (or games in general, in the sense of structured form of play) lead to psychopathy.
Of course you are right. What I had on my mind was that what is around the chess, may indicate to the psychopatic values, I mean the whole background, it is clear for everyone, the king the, the queen, the knight, the pawns, that hierarchy, that fight between two kingdoms. It reflects the STS world.

You play the chess which is very mathematical game, however in the same time you are getting some idea, about the life and context in which it is included. Some genius or geniuses developed chess and gave to the king as the opportunity to share with humanity a fantastic game or just to please the king, nevermind, and after that it started appear on the tables of the "elites" (also psychopatic) lived in the past times. And this is begining of the chess.

The chess as the game, only game, without any idea behind it is very interesting and valuable game. How I wrote in my previous post in this thread, I keep it and repeat: I like chess, I play a bit this is opportunity to train analytic mind (also intuition and precognition skills which fill the gap of the not perfect conscious mind and brain), hovewer it is just a game and very seductive game. It allows to develop skills desirable for scientific mind, but always chess will be a game and it is worth to learn maths or programming or something similar. Enjoying chess may be a sign of the predisposition to the sciences.

What I could add is that, yes, if two people, thanks to the free will, start the chess, this is okay and can strengthen their minds, the one things which is "for not" is that that chess can be addictive for some and this just a game...
 
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