Diabetes

Laura

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Re: Diabetes in America(comic)

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Added: LOL!
Yes, when I'm searching for posts that need merging, I will make a post in the main thread so it comes to the top in the merge list. When I'm done, I usually delete said "post" (which consists of just a period). I forgot.
 

Gawan

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Re: Diabetes in America(comic)

Laura said:
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Added: LOL!
Yes, when I'm searching for posts that need merging, I will make a post in the main thread so it comes to the top in the merge list. When I'm done, I usually delete said "post" (which consists of just a period). I forgot.

Oh well, this sounds like connecting/collecting the dots. ;D
 

Cathryn

The Force is Strong With This One
Re: Diabetes Discussion

More supporting research evidence linking food and the brain

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608182645.htm


ScienceDaily (June 9, 2010) — Defects in insulin function -- which occur in diabetes and obesity -- could directly contribute to psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia.

"Understanding the molecular link between insulin action and dopamine balance -- the connection between food and mood -- offers the potential for novel therapeutic approaches, the researchers said. The mouse model described in the current studies may be useful for testing schizophrenia and cognition-enhancing treatments."
 

zim

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FOTCM Member
Re: Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

[Hi Psyque

Some days ago I wanted to ask about this because my husband have Diabetes & Hipertension and he wanted to follow the Paleodiet but we doesnt really know how can affect him the fat and eat too much meat ofcourse doesnt eat carbohidrates and sugar and milk are really good for him but what could be the best diet for him and low down the cholesterol and triglycerides
In another hand can you give me some advice about this

This is very interesting, as diabetes is really nasty and widespread. Capsaicin its been used in diabetes to treat one of its painful complications (neuropathy), as it acts on Substance P which is a neurotransmitter of pain.
A person who suffer Diabetes can have Neuropathies? and we can be talking about psychopathy :huh: :huh: :scared:
 

Approaching Infinity

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Re: Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

zim said:
This is very interesting, as diabetes is really nasty and widespread. Capsaicin its been used in diabetes to treat one of its painful complications (neuropathy), as it acts on Substance P which is a neurotransmitter of pain.
A person who suffer Diabetes can have Neuropathies? and we can be talking about psychopathy :huh: :huh: :scared:

Neuropathy refers to nerve damage, which is different that psychopathy, so I don't think you need to worry! :)
 

zim

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FOTCM Member
Re: Meta-analysis show superiority of lower-carb diets in diabetes

Laura said:
Yeah, amazing, isn't it?

And it's not just diabetics that benefit from the low/restricted carb diets. People with blood type O should really limit carbs and people with "hypogylycemia" or hyperinsulinism. I find that I feel best keeping the level to right around 10 to 15 grams of carbs per day. My body feels better and more energetic, my mind is sharper, aches and pains diminish, and so on.

Yeah, that's a pretty low amount of carbs, but it really works for me. I've almost adjusted to the fact that this is the way life should be for a type O with hyperinsulinism... forever. It's not easy, but it can be done. The upside is that you CAN have about all the fat you want and it really doesn't make you gain weight - as long as there are no carbs!!!
That means you can have ice-cream made with real cream (no milk) and stevia!!! A little vanilla and lemon zest, and YUM!

Cocoa with cream and stevia...

And even though pork is generally considered to be bad for all blood types, I still love my bacon and eggs!

Well If I read before this part I would read one of my answer before post !!!!! :-[ :-[
 

zim

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FOTCM Member
Re: Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

Approaching Infinity said:
zim said:
This is very interesting, as diabetes is really nasty and widespread. Capsaicin its been used in diabetes to treat one of its painful complications (neuropathy), as it acts on Substance P which is a neurotransmitter of pain.
A person who suffer Diabetes can have Neuropathies? and we can be talking about psychopathy :huh: :huh: :scared:

Neuropathy refers to nerve damage, which is different that psychopathy, so I don't think you need to worry! :)

Thanks Approaching Infinity, :rotfl: Im not familiar with Psychological terms!!!!!! :P
 

WhiteBear

Jedi Master
Re: Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

zim said:
Thanks Approaching Infinity, :rotfl: Im not familiar with Psychological terms!!!!!! :P
Neuropathy is more a physiological term :) If you've ever had the feeling of a phantom icepick going into your foot, or your ear, or some other body part, staying for just a while, then going away, you've probably experienced a mild incident of neuropathy.
 

Gaby

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Re: Possible link between pain and diabetes? A link to an article..

zim said:
[Hi Psyque

Some days ago I wanted to ask about this because my husband have Diabetes & Hipertension and he wanted to follow the Paleodiet but we doesnt really know how can affect him the fat and eat too much meat ofcourse doesnt eat carbohidrates and sugar and milk are really good for him but what could be the best diet for him and low down the cholesterol and triglycerides.

You will find the following article interesting:

Four patients who changed my life
http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/cardiovascular-disease/four-patients-who-changed-my-life/#more-3923

It is about fats and how they can lower insulin requirements and lower unhealthy unhealthy levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

The carbohydrates he eats should be from complex carbohydrates sources, like sweet potatoes, vegetables, etc. In your country there are so many choices in the ways of tubers, veggies. :)

Then lots of fats, you can get a hold of organic lard which is good. And also meats. Pretty much the diet we've been discussing here. He doesn't have to be afraid of fats, at least not the good fats.
 

Laura

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Re: Meta-analysis show superiority of lower-carb diets in diabetes

zim said:
Laura said:
Yeah, amazing, isn't it?

And it's not just diabetics that benefit from the low/restricted carb diets. People with blood type O should really limit carbs and people with "hypogylycemia" or hyperinsulinism. I find that I feel best keeping the level to right around 10 to 15 grams of carbs per day. My body feels better and more energetic, my mind is sharper, aches and pains diminish, and so on.

Yeah, that's a pretty low amount of carbs, but it really works for me. I've almost adjusted to the fact that this is the way life should be for a type O with hyperinsulinism... forever. It's not easy, but it can be done. The upside is that you CAN have about all the fat you want and it really doesn't make you gain weight - as long as there are no carbs!!!
That means you can have ice-cream made with real cream (no milk) and stevia!!! A little vanilla and lemon zest, and YUM!

Cocoa with cream and stevia...

And even though pork is generally considered to be bad for all blood types, I still love my bacon and eggs!

Well If I read before this part I would read one of my answer before post !!!!! :-[ :-[

The above was written before I became aware of how dairy was contributing to my pain. I was getting the blood sugar under control then, but not the autoimmune Rheumatoid Arthritis. Also, I wasn't completely gluten free.

So, gluten and dairy free, lots of meats and fats and softly cooked veggies.
 

Gaby

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Re: Diabetes Discussion

This article is from the Greenmedinfo.com newsletter. It brings the issue of dairy, gluten, soy, lectins and their role in the development of diabetes. The part of diabetes type I is particularly interesting. See the original source for more hyperlinks.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/diabetes-reversible-november-10-greenmedinfocom-newsletter

Diabetes: An Entirely Preventable & Reversible Condition?

Though this may sound like heresy to many of us who have been schooled to believe that when diabetes "happens" to you, it is with you for life. There is far more to the story than both chemical and naturally-based palliative medicine normally touches upon.

DownloadedFile.jpeg


According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) statistics, Diabetes now afflicts 23.6 million Americans, or 7.8% of our population. Only 5 to10% of Diabetics are type 1, where through autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta-cells, they now have a lifelong dependence on insulin. The rest are classified as type 2, resulting from insulin resistance (the cells of the body stop responding to insulin) combined in some cases with insulin deficiency. According to the ADA there are 54 million Americans who have pre-diabetes, or 17% of our population.

What's causing this epidemic? Is it really just "bad genes" or what we are putting into our bodies? Diabetes is a serious, life-threatening condition that has everything to do with what one eats (excessive and poor food choices) and what one does not eat (nutritional deficiencies), and much less to do with the supposed biological fatalism of our genes.

While geneticists apply vast amounts of time, energy and money to finding the "causes" of disease in our genes, much less attention is placed on research that has already demonstrated the triggers of autoimmunity such as infections, vaccines, pesticide and petroleum exposure (diesel fuel particles) and the consumption of foods like wheat, cow's dairy and soy (unfermented, GMO and/or excessive) are the major contributing factors in the development of type 1 diabetes. Additionally, the consumption of high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oil and basic deficiencies of omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium and chromium contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

Blaming "bad genes" on diseases like diabetes is a convenient way to escape the obvious things we can do individually, and as a culture, to prevent the escalation of an already epidemic problem.

We shouldn't settle for the unlikely prospect of a future "cure" via the pharmaceutical pipeline, gene therapy, stem cell research or similar scientific fantasies, when the cause (and therefore the cure) of diabetes may be as close to us as what is at the end of our fork.

It is accepted truth that type 1 diabetes involves the immune system attacking the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Subsequent damage to the pancreas leads to the reduced capacity to produce insulin. While geneticist look for the "bad genes" that are supposedly "causing" the autoimmune problem, it is well documented that in susceptible individuals something in wheat known as gliadin, for instance, stimulates diabetogenic class II HLA antigens on the surface of the pancreatic islet cells (cells that normally do no display these antigens), marking them for autoimmune destruction. [Do dietary lectins cause disease? BMJ 1999;318:1023-1024].

Not everyone who eats wheat will develop diabetes. Different people will exhibit differing degrees of susceptibility to wheat proteins and this is why it is right to say that there is a "genetic component" to the development of type 1 diabetes, or to any disease. But acknowledging the existence of genetic differences and differing susceptibilities to illness in a population is not to say that genes are "causing" the disease (read my short essay on why genes don’t “cause” disease here).

In the case of the wheat protein gliadin, it is not the gene that is causing the islet cell to present an antigen on its surface. It takes wheat gliadin to activate the genes necessary for this cellular transformation. To use an analogy, the genes predisposing one to higher risk for diabetes are like an "unloaded gun." The "bullets" are certain antigenic foods like wheat, cow's dairy and (unfermented, GMO and/or excessive) soy. The "triggers" that "fire" this "loaded gun" are varied, from prolonged exposure to these foods, to increased intestinal/gut permeability, vaccinations, viral infections, pesticide and chemical exposures and perhaps a multitude of as of yet unknown factors.

If we know that the three most commonly lauded "health foods," wheat, dairy and soy all are implicated in the development of type 1 diabetes, wouldn't it be a good idea to remove them from the diets of our young as a precaution? What is the other alternative? Succumb to the fatalistic fallacies of the "gene theory" of disease, and just hope that our children won't develop the disease because they do not have "the bad gene," or have just been lucky in the game of nutritional Russian roulette?

Even after the beta cells in the pancreas have experienced significant levels of destruction, and there is now insufficient insulin to keep blood sugar below toxic levels, the medical establishment pretends like the body’s self-healing and regenerative abilities don’t exist. Every minute 70,000 cells in our body are reborn, and over the course of 100 days all 17 trillion are replaced by new cells. If one can remove the causes of autoimmune self-destruction by clearing infections, removing diabetogenic foods, correcting mineral and vitamin deficiencies and imbalances, shifting the tissue and blood pH back from dangerously acidic levels, and supplementing the diet with proven beta-cell regenerating foods, herbs, or nutrients, the pancreas (in some cases) can regenerate beta cell function. [see list of beta cell regenerators here].

c_peptide.jpg


A good endocrinologist or clinician will test for C-peptide levels the moment he is confronted with a newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic. The proinsulin precursor to insulin produced by your beta cells is composed of three parts: two insulin side chains, named A and B, and a peptide holding the two together known as C. Once the proinsulin is enzymatically degraded by the beta cells and its constituent parts released into serum to do their job, it splits off into three separate parts leaving the C-peptide as an accurate marker of just how much insulin the diabetic body is producing. Taking a baseline reading at the beginning of treatment establishes the pancreas’ level of health insofar as it reflects its remaining capacity to produce insulin. Instead of blindly throwing synthetically produced insulin at the problem (which through a negative feedback loop may cause beta cell regeneration to flounder, or cause further atrophy of those cells) a bare minimum of insulin should be used while encouraging the diabetic pancreas to come back on line with more of its own production.

Moreover, the form of insulin being passed on as “bioidentical” with misleading names like Humulin and Humolog is a byproduct of recombinant DNA technology. All prescribed forms on the market, including Lantus, come from GMO E. coli bacteria which produce a form which is not as compatible with the human body as the once universally available bovine or porcine forms. Access to glandular extracts have been barred in the US mostly due to drug company pressures (You can order these animal forms from Canada over the internet). If the drug companies and their enforcers (FDA) have their way, all bioidenticals and/or animal glandulars will be made illegal or unavailable in the future, including Armour thyroid in favor of levothyroxine.

Ultimately, type 1 diabetes can be prevented. Even after there is established damage to the pancreas, much of the damage can be reversed. These words are heretical to the conventional medical establishment, but absolutely rudimentary from the perspective of basic biology and enlightened nutrition.

If type 1 diabetes can be reversed, reversing type 2 diabetes should not represent any special challenge.

Type 2 diabetes, and the prediabetic state of insulin resistance that precedes it, are caused by the following preventable factors:

1) excessive consumption of calories.
2) Inactivity; lack of exercise.
3) Consumption of “hidden sweets,” which are high glycemic foods that don’t taste sweet but make the blood sweet, e.g pasta, cereal, crackers.
a) Excess sugar, but even worse....high fructose corn syrup, and other sources of concentrated fructose: e.g. sugar, agave.
4) hydrogenated oils.
5) nutritional deficiencies of minerals, especially magnesium, chromium and zinc, and omega 3 fatty acids, as found in foods like flaxseed, walnuts and wild fish.
6) chemical exposures, including environmental pollution, e.g. pesticides, and drugs, e.g. various prescribed and over the counter drugs.

One of the basic mechanisms of insulin resistant hyperglycemia (type 2 diabetes) is as follows:

When we eat beyond our capacity, excess energy is stored in the body as glycogen and saturated fat. When through prolonged over-consumption of food our body no longer has room to store these unneeded calories, insulin resistance emerges. As if to protect itself from caloric over-saturation, the fat cells and muscle cells begin to lose the number of insulin receptors and/or loose function, thus reducing the amount of glucose that may enter. This causes the blood sugar to raise to unhealthy levels leaving the pancreas with no other option than to overcompensate and produce more insulin. The resultant elevation of insulin levels can cause a number of adverse cardiovascular, neurological and endocrine effects.

If this cycle continues, eventually the insulin producing beta cells may become enervated and lose their ability to produce insulin, resulting in “double diabetes” where you have low insulin and high blood sugar as well as insulin resistance.

Caloric restriction becomes of vital importance in forestalling the development of type 2 diabetes. Exercise is essential in helping the body use up stored energy, converting calories consumed into calories burned. Exercise has the opposite effect of over-eating, increasing the number of insulin receptors in muscle and increasing the sensitivity of the body to insulin thus releasing the pancreas of the burden of constant insulin production. Exercise also results in the release of appetite suppressing hormones and neurotransmitters which help to forestall over-eating.

Carbohydrates generally have an insulin secreting effect on the body because they have a high glycemic rating. That is to say, carbohydrates cause the blood to become sweeter than protein or fat, which are broken down slowly in the body, independently of insulin. Even so-called "complex carbohydrates" like puffed rice have higher glycemic ratings (110) than white sugar (80), which is itself 50% fructose, and therefore less likely to induce an insulin response than these "whole grains." On the flip side, fructose while having a low glycemic rating, can raise blood sugar on the back end by reducing the affinity of insulin for its receptor contributing to insulin resistance and elevating blood glucose.

When it comes to "whole grains," no food category is associated with greater misunderstanding in realm of blood sugar disorders. The perception that "whole grains" are good for our health and should be consumed in plenty is based on the assumption that the millions of years of biological evolution that preceded the advent of the agrarian revolution (circa 10,000 b.c.) are no longer relevant. We spent 300,000 years as archaic homo sapiens in the capacity of hunters, gatherers and foragers, where the consumption of cereal grasses, and especially the seed form of these grasses, would not have occurred with any regularity, if at all, excepting starvation pressures.

Our metabolism is simply not designed for large amounts of starch, sugar, and synthetically produced sweeteners and fats. We need fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts, and high quality animal protein in plenty. Evidence exists demonstrating that the glycoproteins in starchy grains known as "lectins," can bind to the leptin receptors in the hypothalamus blocking out the appetite suppressing effects of the hormone leptin. This is one reason why bread, pasta, cereal, crackers, etc. can generate incessant cravings and contribute to a condition known as "leptin resistance." Wheat lectin also has affinity for insulin receptors in the body which could result in both insulin-receptor stimulation based weight gain and/or insulin resistance.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) has been shown to cause insulin resistance in rats and humans. It also been associated with insatiable hunger and increased production of fat by the liver, along with other blood lipid alterations associated with "metabolic syndrome" which includes high triglycerides, increased blood pressure, low HDL and elevated LDL. Hydrogenated oils dramatically reduce the responsiveness of our muscle and fat to insulin, whereas omega 3 fatty acids increase that responsiveness. To view our extensive data sets on ameliorative substances, dietary considerations and the relevance of drug and environmental chemical exposures in type 1 and type diabetes, visit our pages on the subject below.
[the numbers reflect the number of studies gathered on the subject thus far]

Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 157
Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1: Prevention 10
Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2 203
Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2: Prevention 5
Diabetes: Cardiovascular Illness 63
Diabetes: Cataract 13
Diabetes: Cognitive Dysfunction 1
Diabetes: Glycation/A1C 20
Diabetes: Hearing Loss 1
Diabetes: Hypertension 1
Diabetes: Kidney Function 12
Diabetes: Lipids/Cholesterol 2
Diabetes: Liver Disease 2
Diabetes: Low Immune Function 2
Diabetes: Memory Problems 1
Diabetes: Nitrogen Economy

Diabetes: Oxidative Stress 3
Diabetes: Prevention 1
Diabetes: Reproductive 1
Diabetes: Sexual Dysfunction/Reproduction 1
Diabetes: Visual Dysfunction 1
Diabetic Amyotrophy 1
Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy 1
Diabetic bladder dysfunction 2
Diabetic Cystopathy 1
Diabetic Embryopathy 2
Diabetic Lipotoxicity 1
Diabetic Microangiopathy 5
Diabetic Nephropathy 15
Diabetic Neuropathies 27
Diabetic Retinopathy 2
Diabetic Ulcer 18
 

Gawan

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Re: Diabetes Discussion

Psyche said:
This article is from the Greenmedinfo.com newsletter. It brings the issue of dairy, gluten, soy, lectins and their role in the development of diabetes. The part of diabetes type I is particularly interesting. See the original source for more hyperlinks.

Thank you for posting Psyche, very interesting and helpful, especially the many other links that are provided.
Well, I can admit through personal experiences myself that to take out gluten, dairy, soy and reducing lectins to a minimum, or preparing them before cooking (soaking), really makes a difference in how to deal with diabetes and how to treat insulin-resitance/insulin intake/blood sugar. Many things are possible, even if many tests/doctors say, that it is okay to eat gluten and the like, when it isn't.

Also, lots of emotional stress and stress itself can influence how to go on with diabetes and how the blood-sugar is going literally. For example here, what I posted some month back Anger and self-hatred can change your body chemistry? and Anarts statement, where the Éiriu-Eolas program, can also play a really important part imo: to deal with emotions and stress.

FWIW, I also recently asked my doctor if my body is still able to produce insulin, he doubted it, but said that we can make a c-peptide test in January and see if my body is still, or producing again insulin. :)

Further we discussed a little bit stem-cell therapy and implantations and he brought up a good point: there are many articles about "reproducing" beta cells (insulin), but what is with the counterpart of insulin: glucagon (alpha-cells)?

Maybe I will do a little bit of research and see what is up with the alpha-cells. ;)
 

NewOrleans

Jedi Master
I went to the doctor recently and found out that I have Diabetes. Then denial, anger and depression. As if my life wasn't complicated enough with asthma, sleep apnea and allergies among other things. I thought obese people got Diabetes? But I'm not fat. I know diet has a lot to do with this - but I never ate an American style diet - and ironically enough I'd already had months of dietary changes that I thought were healthy changes... Completely gave up all sugar. Whole milk in coffee. No white pasta, white potato or white rice or white breads. No High Fructose. Not much of a drinker. Wine with dinner but never that much anyway. Just no sugars or glutens at all hardly. ( maybe a wheat cracker or nuts if I got hungry.) Never did like soda or fried foods or fast foods. We eat mostly a Mediterranean diet rather than American. And now this??
I declined the statin drugs just on intuition after a first bout of bad reactions (hands and feet got swollen drastically) and now I see research saying that these statin drugs do the opposite of helping anyway.

I've been doing online reading about this Diabetes thing and the information is overwhelming and sometimes seemingly contradictory.. For a year now a vegan friend has been pushing his "Eat to Live" by Joel Fuhrman books and CDs on me like some religious zealot but it's not sounding appealing to me either. I may be from New Orleans, but never a big foodie there. That Creole diet was way too rich. But Veganism is like Puritanism by comparison.

So I'm sitting here at 5 AM with this new glucose meter, kit and lancets, figuring out how to jab my hand and draw blood and knowing I can't afford this expensive stuff twice a day. (I was just about to drop my health insurance because they raised the rates.) I'm just too poor to afford this and yet the horror stories of blindness and amputation just scare the bejesus out of me. It's not a thing to ignore.

I'm in a funk and could use some sane advice if anyone wishes to offer it.
 

ginebra

Jedi Council Member
Hi NewOrleans,

I am so sorry to hear about you had been diagnosed with this affliction. Perhaps a more radical change in your diet would help,that is to say
eliminating completely gluten, dairies, rice, potato and in general those starchy foods.Eat more good faty meats,vegetables and a little exercice.

I hope this conditon gets better with some dietary changes and it is not necessary to start taking drugs. Sure others will provide you with more
accurate guidelines.

My best wishes
 
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