Diabetes

H-KQGE

Dagobah Resident
Re: Diabetes Discussion

Here's a hypothesis on the partnership of neural circuitry ("brain-centred system" hypothalamus & others) & pancreatic islet cells, with regards to maintaining glucose levels.

http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/11/06/brain-may-play-key-role-in-blood-sugar-metabolism-and-diabetes-development/

November 6, 2013
Brain may play key role in blood sugar metabolism and diabetes development
Michael McCarthy
UW Health Sciences and UW Medicine

Posted under: Health and Medicine, Research, Science

A growing body of evidence suggests that the brain plays a key role in glucose regulation and the development of type 2 diabetes, researchers write in the Nov. 7 ssue of the journal Nature. If the hypothesis is correct, it may open the door to entirely new ways to prevent and treat this disease, which is projected to affect one in three adults in the United States by 2050.

In the paper, lead author Dr. Michael W. Schwartz, UW professor of medicine and director of the Diabetes and Obesity Center of Excellence, and his colleagues from the universities of Cincinnati, Michigan, and Munich, note that the brain was originally thought to play an important role in maintaining normal glucose metabolism With the discovery of insulin in the 1920s, the focus of research and diabetes care shifted to almost exclusively to insulin. Today, almost all treatments for diabetes seek to either increase insulin levels or increase the body’s sensitivity to insulin.

“These drugs,” the researchers write, “enjoy wide use and are effective in controlling hyperglycemia [high blood sugar levels], the hallmark of type 2 diabetes, but they address the consequence of diabetes more than the underlying causes, and thus control rather than cure the disease.”

New research, they write, suggests that normal glucose regulation depends on a partnership between the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, the pancreatic islet cells, and neuronal circuits in the hypothalamus and other brain areas that are intimately involved in maintaining normal glucose levels. The development of diabetes type 2, the authors argue, requires a failure of both the islet-cell system and this brain-centered system for regulating blood sugar levels .

In their paper, the researchers review both animal and human studies that indicate the powerful effect this brain-centered regulatory system has on blood glucose levels independent of the action of insulin. One such mechanism by which the system promotes glucose uptake by tissues is by stimulating what is called “glucose effectiveness.” As this process accounts for almost 50 percent of normal glucose uptake, it rivals the impact of insulin-dependent mechanisms driven by the islet cells in the pancreas.

The findings lead the researchers to propose a two-system model of regulating blood sugar levels composed of the islet-cell system, which responds to a rise in glucose levels by primarily by releasing insulin, and the brain-centered system that enhances insulin-mediated glucose metabolism while also stimulating glucose effectiveness.

The development of type 2 diabetes appears to involve the failure of both systems, the researchers say. Impairment of the brain-centered system is common, and it places an increased burden on the islet-centered system. For a time, the islet-centered system can compensate, but if it begins to fail, the brain-centered system may decompensate further, causing a vicious cycle that ends in diabetes.

Boosting insulin levels alone will lower glucose levels, but only addresses half the problem. To restore normal glucose regulation requires addressing the failures of the brain-centered system as well. Approaches that target both systems may not only achieve better blood glucose control, but could actually cause diabetes to go into remission,
they write.
 

Gawan

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Laura said:
Important item: Some of us just need to make peace with the fact that we will NEVER be able to eat more than a few carbs per day.

I think this is really the case and especially for diabetics. Because as Dr. Bernstein wrote in his books, carbs are difficult to measure in connection with insulin. I eat sometimes about 10-20 gr carbs a day in veggie form - mainly green beans and carrots - just to give the blood sugar a boost and it seems to do well and the trick for me. And with that I'm still in ketosis, according to blood tests. I think I got with a ketogenic diet also more resistant to side effects of too low blood sugars. Of course this is not a goal and there are limits.

Anyway, some (positive) facts of a ketogenic diet and some HbA1c over the last 7 months:

04/2014: 5.7%
07/2014: 5.4%
11/2014: 5.3%

With these results I'm not recognizable as a diabetic, since a healthy human being has a range of 4-5.9% (it may differ from country to country) :). And when nothing goes really wrong the highest blood sugar is about 11 mmol/l (198 mg/dl) and I get also only in rare cases. Though a ketogenic diet is a great tool to balance things, nonetheless there are also bad days and weeks where it is impossible to determine what causes what.
 

Gaby

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Gawan, that is impressive! :wow: I don't know of any diabetic with those levels. Well, now I know you :thup:
 

Odyssey

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Gaby said:
Gawan, that is impressive! :wow: I don't know of any diabetic with those levels. Well, now I know you :thup:

Those numbers are great! I've never seen such numbers with a diabetic. Good for you!

I once worked with a guy who's A1c was 13! :scared:
 

Nienna

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Gawan said:
Anyway, some (positive) facts of a ketogenic diet and some HbA1c over the last 7 months:

04/2014: 5.7%
07/2014: 5.4%
11/2014: 5.3%

With these results I'm not recognizable as a diabetic, since a healthy human being has a range of 4-5.9% (it may differ from country to country) :). And when nothing goes really wrong the highest blood sugar is about 11 mmol/l (198 mg/dl) and I get also only in rare cases. Though a ketogenic diet is a great tool to balance things, nonetheless there are also bad days and weeks where it is impossible to determine what causes what.

That's fantastic, Gawan! I am not a health practitioner, but seeing that a non-diabetic has a range of 4-5.9% and what yours averages, well, it doesn't take a professional to see what a huge deal this is. Way to go! :thup:
 

Gawan

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There was very recently a study published with young diabetics on a very low carb diet in the magazine Pediatrics, the main author is among others Belinda S. Lennerz. The results:

We suggest that a VLCD may allow for exceptional control of T1DM without increased risk of adverse events. This possibility is mechanistically plausible because of the dominant effects of dietary carbohydrates on postprandial glycemia and the lower insulin doses required with a VLCD. The results, if confirmed in clinical trials, indicate that the chronic complications of T1DM might be prevented by diet. In light of study limitations, these findings by themselves should not be interpreted as sufficient to justify a change in diabetes management. Additional research is needed to determine the degree of carbohydrate restriction (and other dietary aspects) necessary to achieve these benefits, optimal insulin regimen to accompany a VLCD (specifically, with regard to avoiding severe hypoglycemia), safety and efficacy (in randomized controlled trials). If this work is a success, trials to evaluate effectiveness in preventing long-term diabetes complications should be conducted.

Another good part is that it is and as far as I know that it is the first study in this direction and was also reported in many very well known news papers, for example the New York Times.

It is very good that some scientists discover this very old therapy form - when it can be called like that - that first was used when no insulin was available. And that they followed Dr. Bernsteins book and diet in the Diabetes Solution, which is also discussed in this topic here. And it mirrors also my results that the blood sugar can best be controlled on a very low carb or ketogenic diet.
 

Gaby

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Another good part is that it is and as far as I know that it is the first study in this direction and was also reported in many very well known news papers, for example the New York Times.

I thought that was very good news. People with type 1 diabetes who were afraid to try low carb, now have more data to make an informed choice. Here's the news story with SOTT highlights:

Low-carb diet helps people with type 1 diabetes -- Sott.net
 

rana

A Disturbance in the Force
I have a Pakistani Sufi friend who is suffering from the side affects of type two diabetes.He is about 40, possibly slightly overweight, and works long hours but not at physical labour.
I haven't seen him for a while and only had a chance to have a fairly brief conversation last night so pardon the sketchiness.
I don't know his blood type, but have googled up what seems to be a fairly comprehensive description of blood types in relation to diet, exercise etc.
I have also advised him to have a TCM checkout.
The Sufi group to which he belongs has become factionalised, and I'm not too sure whether the form of meditation (we have discussed hara breathing and Irish dancing) I thought would be most suitable for him is being practised.
This is the whirling dervish dance which I understand is only really done under Inspiration anyway.
He has also been, though not recently to my knowledge, subject to some fairly severe spiritual attacks, by what seems to be a Aryan coven (?) so this may be a factor too.
Any recommendations anyone?

Hi
Being Pakistani myself I advice you to read this great piece of content for all the information about Diabetes.
How to Cure Diabetes Naturally in 30 Days Without Medication?
If you need further suggestion or help, just reply!
 

anka

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I have a question. A pregnant friend of mine went to gynecologist and was sent for diabetes test which they allegedly do to all pregnant women to find out out whether they are in risk. The procedure goes as this:

- they take your blood sample
- you drink 300 grams! of glucose
- they take another blood sample, compare and then tell you the result

Is is normal? It sounds unbelievable to me and I would rather think it may cause collapse of the system in vulnerable individuals. I just don't have a clue - maybe it is a standard procedure.
 

Gawan

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I have a question. A pregnant friend of mine went to gynecologist and was sent for diabetes test which they allegedly do to all pregnant women to find out out whether they are in risk. The procedure goes as this:

- they take your blood sample
- you drink 300 grams! of glucose
- they take another blood sample, compare and then tell you the result

Is is normal? It sounds unbelievable to me and I would rather think it may cause collapse of the system in vulnerable individuals. I just don't have a clue - maybe it is a standard procedure.

That sounds like really a lot. Normally they use the oral glucose tolerance test with about 75 gr of sugar (according to the WHO). But countries differ. Maybe she drank a juice/energy drink with 300ml?


Wikipedia adds:

A variant is often used in pregnancy to screen for gestational diabetes, with a screening test of 50 g over one hour. If elevated, this is followed with a test of 100 g over three hours.
 

anka

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It's actually worse than that as I just found out - there are two rounds of drinking 300g of glucose and blood sample taken after each of them. All during one session, approximately 4 hours. But she wisely refused that although doctors were angry with her. And when she did research afterwards, the standard procedure in Czech should be around those 75g as you mentioned. Thank you for clarification. To me it's unbelievable what some medics are trying. This was apparently an unusual case but somebody must have told them to do it. A salesman? Director of the clinic? Don't know. Will update if there'll be some more info.
 

anka

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Will update if there'll be some more info.
It turns out the nurse misinformed my friend, who fortunately stood her ground and refused to be tested this way.
The whole procedure is still over the top from my point of view.
There are two rounds of drinking 150 grams of glucose (300 grams in total) in 1 hour time frame and the results are available within 24 hours. To me such amount is still unacceptable and can cause damage to a tested person.
 
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