I'm losing weight!

Approaching Infinity

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RedFox said:
In the end he referred me to the 'gut' (can't spell the proper medical word for this type of doctor!) expert....which I would hear from in 3-4weeks....they will probably be testing for celiac disease (I told him I hadn't eaten wheat for 2 years!), probably by getting me to eat wheat and then taking a biopsy (this isn't confirmed yet).
Hi RedFox, have you watched this video on gluten sensitivity? http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/video-tutorial/gluten-sensitivity-what-is-it/

Dr. Osborne talks about biopsies and tests for gluten sensitivity. It seems biopsies aren't necessarily that accurate (he mentions one woman who had several, and only the last one turned out to be positive). He recommends genetic testing. It's kind of expensive (over $300), but apparently it's really accurate.
 

Turgon

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I left feeling pretty angry actually.
Something had upset my stomach (I think) the day before....quite possibly eating sweet potatoes. So I'd gone there feeling really run down and aching all over (again).

Had a rant, followed by a nice cocoa/peppermint tea and calmed down. As far as doctors go he's pretty good...but one thing I've learnt is they don't seem to either know about or want to go into certain subjects....I can't work out which it is.

In the end I think I'm angry about a few things....firstly that I hadn't been taking better care of myself, and that I may well not have been eating enough. Secondly that I seem to know more about (and be better at working out) what's wrong with me than the doctor does.....I think I'm angry about that because of those around me pushing for me to go see a doctor....which I guess comes back to the first point.
My girlfriend wants me to go for the wheat test if that's what's suggested, my mum says I can decline if I want (she's just happy my weights slowly going up and that I'm not taking so many pills and powders).
So I have a gaping hole in my strategic enclosure (and my ability to see my own problems) when it comes to health issues it seems.

My weight it seems is to do with whatever the underlying condition is that causes my fatigue and my whole body to ache. Eating less than my body needs stops this problem.....changing my diet has helped, but the problem is still there....if I eat enough calories to gain weight I get the fatigue and all over body ache.
My thought on this is systematic candida....but a low grade infection perhaps. I had run out of caprylic acid a week ago, so got some more and took a large dose this morning. Well the pain in my guts came back...I guess something was being killed off. Now I'm groggy/tired (but not foggy).....feels like die off symptoms.
So I'm thinking that I need to do some sort of heavy metal detox to stop the candida reoccurring....if it is candida. From my observation of where I have had pain in my guts I'm thinking that my liver has been getting rid of something (a heavy metal?) only to have candida/gut damage/inflammation to occur around the bile duct and small intestine, the toxin then re-entering my system.
Redfox, I may be way off, but from reading your posts, I can't help get the feeling that maybe part of the reason you have such low energy and can't keep on weight is because you are spending so much of your time thinking about it. I've heard that it takes more time for your body to recover from mental work than it does physical work. Can there also be a case of you mentally draining yourself with this constant concern for weight gain.

I've been thinking about it recently because I have the same concerns about weight and living with my parents like you and andi have mentioned. The compulsive need to put on weight. What if it's almost like a specific life lesson as in the one thing you want is to gain weight, but because of your metabolism, it's the hardest thing to reach. It's like an emotional hook that's used to feed off of you through compulsive thoughts. And that this is also manifesting physically in the body.

I think by letting go of this attachment to weight-gain (the obsessive kind) and detoxing your body for the emotional and mental benefits will undoubtedly have an affect on your body's ability to digest and burn off food. Kind of like 'it happens when you least expect it'. Easier said than done, but isn't this what non-anticipation is about?

Hi Andi I know what you mean.
Things are generally better than they use to be when it comes to this sort of draining, but it sure does make a difference when my parents spend time away. trying to find enough of an income to move out is a problem, so I'm grateful for my parents support.....I'm sure they wish I'd move out as much as I'd like to be able to afford my own place.
For all I know I have a draining effect on them too.
My relationship with my parents is pretty good.....except due to fatigue etc I tend to clutter up there space.
Do take care of yourself, and try to keep your eyes open to any feeding situations and programs that pop up automatically at home. :)
 

RedFox

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Thanks everyone I really appreciate it, I was feeling a little low/fed up of the situation when I posted that.
AI I hadn't seen that video yet, but really like the sound of DNA testing for the condition. I will do my homework and take it with me when I get called in to the specialist....I will be refusing to ingest wheat. Even if I have to pay for the DNA test myself I don't mind if it shows for sure that I am as sensitive to wheat as my observations show....
Thinking about it I find the whole thing slightly absurd (learning to stand up for myself in the process).....I think the only reason I'm doing this is to prove to others what I already know. From a strategic enclosure point of view though it seems rather useful.
If it turns out I can prove I'm sensitive to wheat :rolleyes: I'm already two years into avoiding it, which I'm pretty sure is the only thing the doctors will say. Or am I missing the point here?

DanielS I think you may well be correct. I have the ability to latch onto something and "give it everything I've got" to the complete exclusion of everything else....problem is I don't always realise I'm doing it!!! I've made myself deathly sick worrying about others health....I've made myself nearly pass out on a fair ground ride I didn't want to be on (as soon as I realised what I was doing and changed my attitude I was fine again)....if this isn't a definition of obsession thinking I don't know what it.
How odd to be able to finally frame that part of myself. I didn't see it until you pointed it out.
Seems that part is tied to "not seeing" too. It even explains the reoccurring dreams I had a while ago......
Thank you for pointing it out!

Working out what I'm subconsciously obsessing over is a pretty weird concept....but it explains a lot. If anyone has any tips on how to do that I'm all ears!
I had worked out some years ago that I had a sort of "set and forget" system.....I can set my mind on something, forget about it and still be totally set on it (especially when it comes to energy/chi type things).
Would this all this be a definition of the wrong use of one of my centres? Motor/moving centre?
 

RedFox

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Just wanted to add something that dawned on me last night....
I was thinking about how if this is something I have, that I need to look up iron in the wave etc because I remember it mentioned in connection with blood....but not what it was about. Perhaps this is something useful to have (if I have it) at some level?Self importance was peeked by this thought.....
I have been wanting to fix my health so that I can be of greater help.....and it dawned on me that by being a greater help maybe my health would fix itself (or at least it would be a secondary concern not a primary goal, so fixing my health would be part of having greater capacity to help....once I started helping)......that I had got my goals backwards. By wanting to get better in order to help more I was looking at it backwards.
Everyone is capable of helping in some shape or form, even in the smallest way....and (I could be wrong but) my understanding is that by helping others we help ourselves.....fixing my health would then be about being of greater help to others, rather than the road block (excuse) to not already helping others (until my health was fixed). What if my health never improves beyond this point? I'd never give more of myself!

Ironically the same goes for money it seems.....I've been trying to work out way to generate more income, so I can give more to the group....perhaps I need to give more to the group, then work out how to increase that capacity (rather than use 'not yet having that capacity to give a lot' as an excuse to 'not give more until I have the capacity').

Seeing that our understandings are completely backwards sometimes is rather liberating!

In short, I wanted to push a boulder up a hill, but wasn't going to do it until my arms where strong enough to push that boulder up the hill.....by waiting for them to get stronger (they are already strong enough, I've done enough healing already).....the only way they get stronger is to push that boulder up the hill. :rolleyes:
You should not martyr yourself (by giving until it hurts yourself/giving to inflict self injury/giving to 'get' something back by proving your worthy), but nor should you wait to give what you already can...with the excuse that you need to have the capacity to give more before you start giving....the greater capacity comes after the giving osit
 

Laura

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Consider this from Mark Hyman:

Imagine having a condition with symptoms so severe that you can't leave the house, yet your doctor calls it a "functional," or "psychosomatic," disease -- meaning that it's all in your head.

Frustrating? Absolutely.

But it's a very real problem for the 60 million people -- that's 20 percent of Americans -- who have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These people are plagued by uncomfortable and often disabling symptoms like bloating, cramps, diarrhea, constipation, and pain.

I have lots of patients with IBS, some of whom have suffered for decades without relief. Their previous doctors couldn't find the cause of the illness, so they were told to just get more fiber or take Metamucil, or were prescribed sedatives, anti-spasm drugs, or antidepressants.

That is NOT the answer. I've found a better way. And in today’s blog I am going to share 5 steps you can take right now to cure IBS without drugs.

But first I want to tell you about a patient of mine ...

Alexis and Her Lifelong Irritable Bowel

At age 45, Alexis had suffered from IBS for 33 years -- almost all of her life! Her major symptom was sudden, painful, cramping diarrhea. She was doing the best she could to prevent it. She didn't consume dairy, didn't drink or smoke, and took Citracel every day. Yet nothing helped.

She would go to the bathroom 4 to 5 times before she even left the house in the morning. And she couldn't go out of the house at all without knowing where all the closest bathrooms would be in case she had what she called "s--- attacks."

That wasn't Alexis' only problem ... She also felt full and bloated after every meal, which starchy foods made worse.

An upper endoscopy had shown that she had gastritis, or inflammation of the stomach, and she had taken many antibiotics over the years. She also had severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS), with irregular periods, breast tenderness, sugar cravings, headaches, and agitation.

She also had unusual symptoms like rectal itching (often a clue to yeast infections or food allergies). And she was tired all the time.

Alexis tried to eat healthy, but her diet was less than ideal. She had a bran muffin and coffee in the morning and a salad for lunch. But her "drug of choice" was sugar -- in the form of cakes, ice cream, Jell-O, diet sodas, and other junk food. Not surprisingly, she was also about 20 pounds overweight.

To help Alexis, all I really did was identify and treat the UNDERLYING CAUSES of her digestive problems! To understand how I did that, you first have to understand a little bit about how the gut works.

How Gut Imbalances Can Lead to IBS

Imagine a tennis court. That is the surface area of your small intestine, where food is absorbed. Your small intestine is also the site of about 60 percent of your immune system. And this sophisticated system gut-immune system is just one-cell layer away from a toxic sewer -- all of the bacteria in your gut.

If that lining breaks down -- from stress, too many antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs, intestinal infections, a low-fiber, high-sugar diet, alcohol, and more -- look out! Your immune system will suffer and you can develop all sorts of digestive problems -- including IBS.

Let's talk a little more about all that bacteria. You've got about 3 pounds of it -- 500 species -- in your gut. In fact, there is more bacterial DNA in your body than there is human DNA! Among all that gut bacteria, there are good guys, bad guys, and VERY bad guys.

If the bad guys take over -- or if they move into areas that they shouldn't (like the small intestine which is normally sterile) -- they can start fermenting the food you digest, particularly sugar or starchy foods.

This is called small bowel bacterial overgrowth -- and it's a major cause of IBS.

The major symptom it causes is bloating, or a feeling of fullness after meals. What causes this bloating? The overproduction of gas by the bacteria as they have lunch on your lunch!

Small bowel bacterial overgrowth can be diagnosed by a breath test, which measures gas production by the bacteria, or by a urine test that measures the byproducts of the bacteria after they are absorbed into your system.

Bacterial overgrowth is a real syndrome and was recently described in a review paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The condition can be treated. In fact, a major paper was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that showed using a non-absorbed antibiotic called rifaximin for 10 days resulted in a dramatic improvement in bloating and overall symptoms of IBS by clearing out the overgrowth of bacteria.

That's great news for many IBS patients. But, unfortunately, not all patients with the same diagnosis are created equal. There's more than one factor that leads to IBS. Another major cause of IBS is food sensitivities.

A landmark paper, was recently published in the prestigious British medical journal Gut that found eliminating foods identified through delayed food allergy testing (IgG antibodies) resulted in dramatic improvements in IBS symptoms. Another article, an editorial in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, stated clearly that we must respect and recognize the role of food allergies and inflammation in IBS.

So the research tells us that these are the two main causes of irritable bowel -- food allergies and overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine -- but there may be others, including a lack of digestive enzymes, parasites living in the gut, zinc or magnesium deficiency, and more.

And this is precisely why it is so critically important to personalize treatment based on the unique circumstances that exist for each person who suffers from IBS -- the solution is most certainly not a one-size-fits-all one. But solutions can be found if we look carefully at the underlying causes and treat them.

Which leads me back to Alexis ...

How I Helped Alexis Heal from IBS

I prescribed Alexis a non-absorbed antibiotic, an antifungal drug for her yeast problem, and had her eliminate the foods to which she was allergic. I believe in treatment that addresses the underlying cause of the problem. If there is a bacterial or yeast infection, then medications are often the best treatments. The key is to effectively treat the cause. If medications do that, then I use them.

Then I gave her supplements of healthy bacteria to normalize her gut and zinc to help with her digestive enzymes (chronic diarrhea can result in zinc deficiency).

I also gave her extra fiber to feed the healthy bacteria, fish oil to reduce gut inflammation, a multivitamin, and herbs to balance her hormones (which are greatly affected by abnormal bacteria).

What happened then may shock some, but I wasn’t surprised. It is the same result I have seen in patient after patient when the principles of functional medicine are applied ...

Alexis came back to see me two months later, and she was a different person. Not only did she lose 20 pounds, she had not had a "s---- attack" and was having normal bowel habits for the first time in 33 years! She also had more energy, and her PMS vanished.

She looked and felt 10 years younger and was free of the suffering she had endured for over three decades.

Do you suffer like Alexis did? It doesn't have to be that way. We have the understanding and tools to deal with this chronic problem and the suffering it causes one in five people. There is no need to wait for any more studies. I have been treating IBS in my practice for over 10 years with dramatic success.

In fact, just recently, one of my patients told me that, for the first time in his life, he didn't have any more stomach pains or digestive problems. He had previously been so bad that he had to have a phone installed in his bathroom!

To take advantage of these discoveries today, simply follow these five steps.

5 Steps to Curing IBS

1. Get tested. Try to get a test for IgG food allergies (see Immunolabs for more information on this testing) and eliminate the foods that test positive for 12 weeks.

2. Test yourself. If you can't afford the test mentioned above, then just eliminate the most common food allergens for 12 weeks -- that's dairy, gluten, yeast, eggs, corn, soy, and peanuts. And then reintroduce them to see if they cause symptoms. This is an effective way to isolate the foods that may be causing you problems.

3. Get rid of the unwanted visitors in your small bowel. Ask your doctor to prescribe rifaximin (Xifaxin) and take two 200 mg tablets 3 times a day for 7 to 10 days. This is often the best way to deal with the chronic bacterial overgrowth that causes bloating and irritable bowel syndrome.

4. Repopulate your digestive tract with good bacteria. I don't usually recommend brands, but when it comes to probiotics the quality varies so much that I suggest taking two specific brands. Take one packet of VSL3 or other high potency probiotic twice a day for 1 to 2 months. This probiotic has over 450 billion organisms per packet. I also recommend a probiotic called S. boulardii take two capsules twice a day for 2 months. This is a special probiotic that helps to further normalize gut function.

5. Read more about the condition and your options. My favorite book on this subject is Digestive Wellness by Elizabeth Lipski.

By taking these steps and seeking out the underlying causes of IBS, you can dramatically improve your health and overcome your digestive disorder.






Rifaximin is a semisynthetic, rifamycin-based non-systemic antibiotic, meaning that very little of the drug will pass the gastrointestinal wall into the circulation as is common for other types of orally administered antibiotics. It is used in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea and hepatic encephalopathy, for which it received orphan drug status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1998.



Uses

Rifaximin is licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat traveler's diarrhea caused by E. coli.[1] Clinical trials have shown that rifaximin is highly effective at preventing and treating traveler's diarrhea among travelers to Mexico, with few side effects and low risk of developing antibiotic resistance.[2] [3] It is not effective against Campylobacter jejuni, and there is no evidence of efficacy against Shigella or Salmonella species.

It may be efficacious in relieving chronic functional symptoms of bloating and flatulence that are common in irritable bowel syndrome.[4] There was recently a pilot-study done on the efficacy of rifaximin as a means of treatment for Rosacea, according to the study, induced by the co-presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.[5]

In the United States, rifaximin has orphan drug status for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.[6] Although high-quality evidence is still lacking, rifaximin appears to be as effective as or more effective than other available treatments for hepatic encephalopathy (such as lactulose), is better tolerated, and may work faster.[7]

[edit] Availability

Rifaximin is currently sold in the U.S. under the brand name Xifaxan by Salix Pharmaceuticals. It is also sold in Europe under the names Spiraxin, Zaxine, Normix, Rifacol and Colidur and in India under the name RIXMIN (Sold by Cipla, cost 9.90/capsule).



References

1. ^ Xifaxan label informationPDF Retrieved November 15, 2008.
2.
3. ^ DuPont, H (2007). "Therapy for and Prevention of Traveler's Diarrhea". Clinical Infectious Diseases 45 (45 (Suppl 1)): S78–S84. doi:10.1086/518155. PMID 17582576.
4.
5. ^ Ruiz J, Mensa L, Pons MJ, Vila J, Gascon J (May 2008). "Development of Escherichia coli rifaximin-resistant mutants: frequency of selection and stability". The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy 61 (5): 1016–9. doi:10.1093/jac/dkn078. PMID 18325895. http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18325895.
6.
7. ^ Sharara A, Aoun E, Abdul-Baki H, Mounzer R, Sidani S, ElHajj I. (2006). "A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of rifaximin in patients with abdominal bloating and flatulence". Am J Gastroenterol 101 (2): 326. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2006.00458.x. PMID 16454838.
8.
9. ^ Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in rosacea: clinical effectiveness of its eradication. Parodi A, Paolino S, Greco A, Drago F, Mansi C, Rebora A, Parodi A, Savarino V.
10.
11. ^ Wolf, David C. (2007-01-09). "Hepatic Encephalopathy". eMedicine. WebMD. http://www.emedicine.com/med/TOPIC3185.HTM. Retrieved 2007-02-15.
12.
13. ^ Lawrence KR, Klee JA (2008). "Rifaximin for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy". Pharmacotherapy 28 (8): 1019–32. doi:10.1592/phco.28.8.1019. PMID 18657018. Free full text with registration at Medscape.
14.
I am presently on day five of the Rixmin.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks Laura.....it had crossed my mind that as iron is absorbed in the small intestine (pretty much instantly like most fats) that given all the trouble I've had seems to centre around my small intestine doing something like this could be something to consider. Need to trust that little voice inside me more.
I will look into it more and see where this path takes me.

Thanks again.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I can be a bit slow to 'get things' sometimes, and went off on a tangent after reading the Mark Hyman quote.....

I came back to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth a few days ago.
After doing some more research on this, I've started using herbs (ginger root, liquorish, enteric coated peppermint oil - I may add others to this soon) to treat for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. I'm on day two and if day one was anything to go by this is the most dramatic improvement in my symptoms (fatigue, lethargy, brain fog, apathy, exhaustion, sleep disturbance etc) I've had in a long time.
I'm also working to improve liver function, and taking supplements to help heal my gut (which I didn't think had a problem, but it appears I was wrong). I'm also taking digestive enzymes again, but this time with hydrochloric acid.

It seems from what I've found that low stomach acid may be a bacterial overgrowth of the stomach, leading to not enough acid to keep bacteria at bay in the small intestine.....feeding them due to not having food broken down enough.....the whole mess then leads to tons of other symptoms including sluggish liver.....the sluggish liver then leads to a lack of stomach acid among everything else. :rolleyes:

One of the mistakes I've been making it seems is to tackle one issue at a time, instead of seeing they are all linked/effect each other....they all need to be corrected at once.

Seems the symptoms from these things also means reading things like the quote posted above Laura, and then totally not getting it (as if I hadn't even read it) :(
I've been noticing this in myself and others on the forum a lot recently (especially reading over my older posts). Its really weird to see how blind I can be.

Laura said:
I am presently on day five of the Rixmin.
How did it go? :)
 

manitoban

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RedFox said:
I can be a bit slow to 'get things' sometimes, and went off on a tangent after reading the Mark Hyman quote.....

I came back to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth a few days ago.
After doing some more research on this, I've started using herbs (ginger root, liquorish, enteric coated peppermint oil - I may add others to this soon) to treat for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. I'm on day two and if day one was anything to go by this is the most dramatic improvement in my symptoms (fatigue, lethargy, brain fog, apathy, exhaustion, sleep disturbance etc) I've had in a long time.
Really glad to hear it RedFox, sounds like you are making great progress in restoring your health. Keep up the good work! :)
 

Laura

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RedFox said:
Laura said:
I am presently on day five of the Rixmin.
How did it go? :)
It made one of the most dramatic improvements in the way my digestive tract works that I've experienced thus far. A couple of the crew here who tried it also say the same, but one here couldn't take it because it made her bloated and miserable. Dunno what that was about, but like we say, everything isn't right for everybody. I'll swear by it for me!
 

SolarMother

Dagobah Resident
I don't know it it is of any help to you but I switched to pipe smoking a week ago. I tried to smoke a cigarette and I was amazed to see just how bad it tasted [/quote]

tell me more about this tobacco you make...i need something different!

Andi--Reading your creative process with tobacco was a lot of fun.
 
A

andi

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tell me more about this tobacco you make...i need something different!

Hi SolarMother,
Well, it has been a while sine I wrote that and since then I have tried different types and came up with different conclusions, so this would take a bit of explanation.

First, I buy the tobacco at a local Native Territory here where I live, Canada. You might not have that opportunity and so your best chance would be to order some on the net. The Indians here claim that their tobacco is 100% natural. Well.., plutonium is natural too after all. So I had to find out as much as I could about this.
And I started with loose tobacco that was coming in a zip-lock bag. The nicotine delivery, as I only later found out, was almost non existent. The smell was a little intriguing and a slightly unpleasant aftertaste(maybe a sign that no additives were added to enforce the taste). So, I decided to make my own mix. After reading a bit on the net, I committed to work and added some molasses, lemon juice, vanilla essence and filtered water ; mixed it all up and in the oven for about 4 hours. The result was good, well better than what was originally -at least this is what I thought at that time. I latter found out that by putting it in the oven at 60 degrees, most, if not all the nicotine was gone(apparently nicotine is very volatile and starts to evaporate from as low as 30 degrees). It was kind of tricky - at the beginning the smoke was harsh but as I added a little bit of humidity to it (but not too much), the smoke became smooth. All in all, it was not too bad but I was still not satisfied.

The absence of nicotine in this Indian tobacco made me wander a lot. I think it has a lot to say about the way they treat their crops. It may be natural as they say, but I tend to think they just have a lot less additives than those on the market.
As for the mix I made, I can definitely NOW say is no good. There are many factors to take into account when making your own mix -that is, transforming a given tobacco into something different.
But you can always take your sort of choice and mix it with peppermint, cloves or other natural oils to experiment with. Personally, I have tried to mix it with cloves and I cannot stand that thing- but this is just personal. I do not enjoy the smell and it numbs my throat like a dentist.

I have tried all kinds of tobacco and I still no conclusion. The ones that sell here at the tobacco shops and that I like are the Drums and Sails green. Drums have a smoky taste to them and it is just so easy to roll. They have a good amount of nicotine. Sails is a pipe tobacco but works okay if rolled with a nice light flavor - not the type that you get bored after a while.
Both this brands have additives; but compared to normal cigarettes, I don't know.

I don't know if this answered your question or if it is clear but I hope it helps.




Note: this could be moved to the "smoking" thread if desired by the mods.
 

davey72

The Living Force
Curious. I had my appendix out about 5 mnths ago now, and i am not sure why, but i have lost about 50 lbs since then.
Slowly, but surely. I have been eating the same, which is to say not very well. I have been trying to eat better lately, now that i'm working again, but i am not sure this is the problem.
Is it possible that these are part of the changes we are gonna go through?
 

shijing

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hi Davey --

davey72 said:
Curious. I had my appendix out about 5 mnths ago now, and i am not sure why, but i have lost about 50 lbs since then.
Slowly, but surely. I have been eating the same, which is to say not very well. I have been trying to eat better lately, now that i'm working again, but i am not sure this is the problem.
I don't know much about how an appendectomy would affect your weight, so perhaps someone who knows more can address that. In the meantime though, 50 pounds seems like quite a bit to lose, although it depends on what kind of condition you were in before the weight loss. When you say you haven't been eating very well, do you mean the kind of food you eat or just how much? Or both? It seems like no matter what, you should be doing your best (using the information from the Diet and Health thread here) to get the best quality food that you're able to, and make sure that you're eating regularly every day. A lot of people skip or forget meals for various reasons, and this could certainly contribute to your weight loss.

davey72 said:
Is it possible that these are part of the changes we are gonna go through?
Maybe, but I wouldn't rely on that assumption. I think you should do everything you can to make sure your diet is as good as possible and that you're eating enough, and see where things stand once you've taken care of that.
 

anart

The Living Force
Approaching Infinity said:
Hi RedFox, have you watched this video on gluten sensitivity? http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/video-tutorial/gluten-sensitivity-what-is-it/

Dr. Osborne talks about biopsies and tests for gluten sensitivity. It seems biopsies aren't necessarily that accurate (he mentions one woman who had several, and only the last one turned out to be positive). He recommends genetic testing. It's kind of expensive (over $300), but apparently it's really accurate.
I just wanted to note that a family member suffering from long term neuropathy read about Dr. Osborne's gluten sensitivity test in the Dot Connector Magazine and underwent the genetic testing. His results show that he is sensitive to gluten and dairy. He is now beginning to remove both from his diet.

If one can afford the genetic test, I think it's a really good idea - especially if that person is on the fence about whether or not gluten/dairy are 'good' for you. It takes a lot to remove a lifetime of food triangle programming for most people, so whatever helps is really valuable.
 
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