Ray Peat: The importance of sugar and the dangers of fat (stress) metabolism

Charade

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I followed up the previous interview with this one. It features Dr Mercola and Dr Doulliard. They don't talk about wheat per se but cover other aspects of his book. In the interest of not throwing the baby out with the bathwater, i think it is worth veiwing.

A brief overview:

They do broach the topic of the lymph system. A combination of 5 herbs can get it cleaned out. Fennel, ginger, cumin, cardamon and coriander. Taken as a pill. or to spice, a dish or as a tea.

He also mentions foods such as celery, apples and beets help the bile to work effectively.

Then they talk about the benefit of light (this harks back to Jack Kruse's claims). He recommends yoga sun salutations done in the AM, preferrably outside, (weather permitting) to absorb the uv lightwaves and to stimulate the lymph system and bile ducts. As well as benefits of breathing deeply, which they go into.

Laying on a foam roller and relaxing for 5-10 mins to open the chest and the stomach. A foam roller, or balls, feel so good to loosen up tight muscles and stimulate blood flows and nerve ending to relax.

DR Doulliard promotes optimizing our own detox system, naturally, in order to reset optimal digestive function. He does want to reboot fat burning. It's Sugar Belly not necessarily Wheat Belly (sprouted whole wheat has a low glycemic index of 36 for a slice of bread) Get the sugar out ones diet is key. DUH but I think I've let this slide too much recently.

A balanced meal with all 6 tastes-sour, bitter, astringent, salt, pungent and sweet to feed the body emotionally as well as physically, balances the body and alleviates craving.

There are sour dough breads that can be gluten free because of the microbes that eat the gluten???


https://youtu.be/3O7556HHURg
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Charade said:
I followed up the previous interview with this one. It features Dr Mercola and Dr Doulliard. They don't talk about wheat per se but cover other aspects of his book. In the interest of not throwing the baby out with the bathwater, i think it is worth veiwing.

A brief overview:

They do broach the topic of the lymph system. A combination of 5 herbs can get it cleaned out. Fennel, ginger, cumin, cardamon and coriander. Taken as a pill. or to spice, a dish or as a tea.

He also mentions foods such as celery, apples and beets help the bile to work effectively.

Then they talk about the benefit of light (this harks back to Jack Kruse's claims). He recommends yoga sun salutations done in the AM, preferrably outside, (weather permitting) to absorb the uv lightwaves and to stimulate the lymph system and bile ducts. As well as benefits of breathing deeply, which they go into.

Laying on a foam roller and relaxing for 5-10 mins to open the chest and the stomach. A foam roller, or balls, feel so good to loosen up tight muscles and stimulate blood flows and nerve ending to relax.
For stimulating lymph, Infra-red light is probably the most effective therapeutic tool that can be used to to increase flow through the vessels... along with breathing and movement.

DR Doulliard promotes optimizing our own detox system, naturally, in order to reset optimal digestive function. He does want to reboot fat burning. It's Sugar Belly not necessarily Wheat Belly (sprouted whole wheat has a low glycemic index of 36 for a slice of bread) Get the sugar out ones diet is key. DUH but I think I've let this slide too much recently.
Seems similar to what everyone else says about sugar... other than Ray Peat of course. I don't think the "sugar is evil" narrative holds up against the data though. I would much rather throw away those whole grains and continue to eat my sugar :)
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
So, here is just a brief overview of the dietary experiment I have recently been undertaking:

3-4 meals per day.

Low fat content - <30g mostly saturated and monounsaturated fats. very little PUFA.
Coconut oil, beef tallow and small amounts of lard. I cut out dairy completely, since my IGG antibody results suggested that I am intolerant to all forms (goats, sheeps and cows milk).

Higher carbohydrate intake - 200-300g
Some starches well cooked such as white rice, white potato, parsnip, and carrot.
Fruit juices (apple and orange) with collagen hydrosylate powder
Some berries (strawberry, blueberry)
2-3 cups coffee per day with 1-2 tablespoons of unrefined organic sugar - No longer jittery feelings nor stress response to coffee.

Supplements
B2, B3, B6, Vitamin A + E, glycine (2 tablespoons throughout the day), bone broth (1 large mug per day).

Results after 4-5 days: Its still early on, but so far my stool consistency has drastically improved. No bloating after meals and also less gas since cutting down fat intake. Also no abdominal pain when after meals. Energy seems to be consistent throughout the day. Difficult to comment on sleep quality or weight gain as it is still early on. Still have dry skin on face, inflamed scalp, and dandruff.

I'm thinking that digestive improvements stem from an inability to emulsify fats, and also the energy increase probably is related to some defect in mitochondrial oxidation of lipid substrate. I'm currently waiting on a stool functional test, so will investigate whats going on further when I get the results. I will probably invest in an organic acids profile to examine mitochondrial function to see whether any deficiencies underlie the defect in oxidation. But so far, so good! At least as a temporary measure until the system can get sorted anyway.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Keyhole said:
I'm thinking that digestive improvements stem from an inability to emulsify fats, and also the energy increase probably is related to some defect in mitochondrial oxidation of lipid substrate. I'm currently waiting on a stool functional test, so will investigate whats going on further when I get the results. I will probably invest in an organic acids profile to examine mitochondrial function to see whether any deficiencies underlie the defect in oxidation. But so far, so good! At least as a temporary measure until the system can get sorted anyway.
Have you looked into "resistant starches"? I recently read about them and found it very interesting.

Also, there's this:

https://www.sott.net/article/343531-Fructose-is-generated-in-the-human-brain

Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new Yale study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior.

The study was published on Feb. 23 by JCI Insight.

Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruits, vegetables, table sugar, and many processed foods. Excess consumption of fructose contributes to high blood sugar and chronic diseases like obesity. The Yale research team had demonstrated in a prior study that fructose and another simple sugar, glucose, had different effects on brain activity. But it was not known whether fructose was produced in the brain or crossed over from the bloodstream.

To investigate, the research team gave eight healthy, lean individuals infusions of glucose over a four-hour period. They measured sugar concentrations in the brains of the study participants using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a noninvasive neuroimaging technique. Sugar concentrations in the blood were also assessed.

The researchers found cerebral fructose levels rose significantly in response to a glucose infusion, with minimal changes in fructose levels in the blood. They surmised that the high concentration of fructose in the brain was due to a metabolic pathway called the polyol pathway that converts glucose to fructose.

"In this study, we show for the first time that fructose can be produced in the human brain," said first author Dr. Janice Hwang, assistant professor of medicine.

While the production of fructose in the brain had been seen in animals, it had not been demonstrated in humans, Hwang noted.

The finding raises several key research questions, which the research team plans to pursue. "By showing that fructose in the brain is not simply due to dietary consumption of fructose, we've shown fructose can be generated from any sugar you eat," said Hwang. "It adds another dimension into understanding fructose's effects on the brain."

Glucose in the brain sends signals of fullness, but that is not the case with fructose, she said.

The conversion of glucose to fructose in the brain, known as the polyol pathway, also occurs in other parts of the body. "This pathway may be one other mechanism by which high blood sugar can exert its adverse effects," Hwang added.

Other Yale authors are Lihong Jiang, Muhammad Hamza, Feng Dai, Renata Belfort-DeAguiar, Gary Cline, Douglas L. Rothman, Graeme Mason, and Robert S. Sherwin.

This study was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation supported by the Clinical Translational Science Award, as well as the Endocrine Fellows Foundation.
 

Adaryn

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I was also reading about resistant starch recently, looking for ways to restore a healthy microbiota.

The article below by Chris Kesser advocates a supplementation with resistant starch - like raw potato starch:

_https://chriskresser.com/how-resistant-starch-will-help-to-make-you-healthier-and-thinner/

How Resistant Starch Will Help to Make You Healthier and Thinner

Over the past several years there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies linking imbalances or disturbances of the gut microbiota to a wide range of diseases including obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, depression and anxiety (1,2,3,4,5). One of the best ways to establish and support a healthy gut microbiome is by providing the right “foods” for your gut bacteria. These “foods” are called prebiotics.

Why you should add resistant starch to your diet.

Prebiotics are indigestible carbohydrates, or at least indigestible to us, that reach the colon intact and selectively feed many strains of beneficial bacteria. Prebiotics are generally classified into three different types: non-starch polysaccharides (such as inulin and fructooligosaccharide), soluble fiber (including psyllium husk and acacia fibers), and resistant starch (RS). Each of these types of prebiotics feeds different species of gut bacteria, but among these, RS is emerging as uniquely beneficial.

The distinctive benefits of RS seem to be unequivocally recognized, even amongst advocates of a low carbohydrate diet.

What is resistant starch?

Resistant starch is a type of starch that is not digested in the stomach or small intestine, reaching the colon intact. Thus, it “resists” digestion. This explains why we do not see spikes in either blood glucose or insulin after eating RS, and why we do not obtain significant calories from RS.

There are four types of resistant starch:

RS Type 1: Starch is physically inaccessible, bound within the fibrous cell walls of plants. This is found in grains, seeds, and legumes.

RS Type 2: Starch with a high amylose content, which is indigestible in the raw state. This is found in potatoes, green (unripe) bananas, and plantains. Cooking these foods causes changes in the starch making it digestible to us, and removing the resistant starch.

RS Type 3: Also called retrograde RS since this type of RS forms after Type 1 or Type 2 RS is cooked and then cooled. These cooked and cooled foods can be reheated at low temperatures, less than 130 degrees and maintain the benefits of RS (6). Heating at higher temperatures will again convert the starch into a form that is digestible to us rather than “feeding” our gut bacteria. Examples include cooked and cooled parboiled rice, cooked and cooled potatoes, and cooked and cooled properly prepared (soaked or sprouted) legumes.

RS Type 4: This is a synthetic form of RS that I’m including for completeness, but would not recommend. A common example is “hi-maize resistant starch.”

Once RS reaches the large intestine, bacteria attach to and digest, or ferment, the starch. This is when we receive the benefits of RS.

How resistant starch impacts our health

The normal human gut has hundreds of bacterial species, some good and some not so good. The overall number and relative quantity of each type has a profound effect on our health and well being. Resistant starch selectively stimulates the good bacteria in our intestines, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria (7).

These good bacteria “feed” on RS and produce short chain fatty acids (through fermentation), the most significant of which are acetate, butyrate, and propionate. Of these three short chain fatty acids (SCFA), butyrate is of particular importance due to its beneficial effects on the colon and overall health, and RS appears to increase butyrate production more when compared with other soluble fibers (8).

Butyrate is the preferred energy source of the cells lining the colon, and it also plays a number of roles in increasing metabolism, decreasing inflammation and improving stress resistance, as described in more detail below and previously in this great article by Stephan Guyenet.

Resistant starch helps to lower blood glucose levels and improve insulin sensitivity

Insulin resistance and chronically elevated blood glucose are associated with a host of chronic diseases, including metabolic syndrome. Several studies have shown that RS may improve insulin sensitivity (9), and decrease blood glucose levels in response to meals (10, 11, 12). In one study, consumption of 15 and 30 grams per day of resistant starch showed improved insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese men, equivalent to the improvement that would be expected with weight loss equal to approximately 10% of body weight (13).

Further, RS has been shown to exert a “second meal effect.” This means that not only does RS beneficially decrease the blood glucose response at the time it’s consumed, but, somewhat surprisingly, blood glucose and insulin levels also rise less than would otherwise be expected with the subsequent meal (14).

Why the popular press has touted resistant starch as a “weight loss wonder food”

RS appears to have several beneficial effects that may contribute to weight loss, including decreased blood insulin spikes after meals (as discussed above), decreased appetite, and decreased fat storage in fat cells. There may also be preservation of lean body mass, though further studies in humans are needed to confirm if there is a significant impact in overall body weight (15).

Further, several studies have shown alterations in the gut microbiome in association with obesity, which subsequently change towards that seen in lean individuals with weight loss (16, 17). For example, one study demonstrated that the relative composition of the gut microbiota of two predominate beneficial bacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, varied considerably in association with body composition. Specifically, obese individuals often have a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, which may be reversed with weight loss, gastric bypass surgery, or treatment with prebiotics (3). However, not all studies confirm a significant or measurable change in the composition of the microbiome in obese compared to lean individuals, and further studies are needed (18, 19).

Butyrate plays an important role in gut health and decreasing inflammation in the gut and other tissues

As mentioned above, RS intake allows for increased production of butyrate by our gut microbes. Butyrate acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory agent for the colonic cells, and functions to improve the integrity of our gut by decreasing intestinal permeability and therefore keeping toxins in the gut and out of the bloodstream. (20, 21).

The SCFAs that aren’t utilized by the colonic cells enter the bloodstream, travel to the liver, and spread throughout the body where they exert additional anti-inflammatory effects.

Resistant starch is also associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer, thought to occur through several different mechanisms including: protection from DNA damage, favorable changes in gene expression, and increased apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cancerous or pre-cancerous cells (22, 23).

Adding resistant starch to your diet

Some common food sources of RS include green (unripe) bananas, plantains, properly prepared cooked and cooled parboiled rice or legumes, and cooked and cooled potatoes. See this link for a more complete list of RS quantities in food.

However, if you are on a low carbohydrate diet or don’t tolerate those foods well, you can add RS to your diet without adding digestible carbohydrates.

Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch (NOT potato flour) is one of the best sources of RS with approximately eight grams of RS in one tablespoon. Potato starch is generally well tolerated even by those who react adversely to nightshades.

Plantain flour and green banana flour are also excellent sources of RS, and there may be benefit to including all three of these sources (specifically alternating your source of RS rather than relying on a single one).

These are relatively bland in flavor and can be added to cold or room temperature water, almond milk, or mixed into smoothies. But to maintain the benefits of RS, these should not be heated above 130 degrees.

Tim Steele (Tatertot) has written about some of the research on RS supplementation, and in particular the potential further benefit of combining potato starch with psyllium husk fiber to even further increase butyrate production in the colon.

Take it slow

If you choose to try supplementing with RS, start with small doses of about ¼ teaspoon once daily, and very gradually increase the amount as tolerated. Some increased gas and bloating is expected as your gut flora changes and adapts, but you do not want to feel uncomfortable. If you experience marked discomfort, then decrease the amount you’re taking for a few days until your symptoms resolve, and then try increasing again gradually.

Studies indicate that the benefits of resistant starch may be seen when consuming around 15 to 30 grams daily (equivalent to two to four tablespoons of potato starch). This may be too much for some people to tolerate, particularly in the setting of gut dysbiosis, and going above this amount is not necessarily beneficial.

If you experience marked GI distress with even small amounts of RS, this may be an indication of SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) or microbial dysbiosis, and you may need to consider working with a healthcare practitioner to establish a more balanced gut microbiome through the use of herbal antimicrobials and probiotics before adding RS or other prebiotics.
But then, the following article from Paleomom argues that just simply adding resistant starch as a "stand alone" supplement (for ie, in the form of raw potato starch) might NOT be the way to go if you want to improve your gut health and reap all the benefits of resistant starch:

_https://www.thepaleomom.com/resistant-starch-its-not-all-sunshine-and-roses/

Resistant Starch: It’s Not All Sunshine and Roses

Throughout the years, tons of “wonder foods” have come and gone within the health community, based on a mixture of legitimate science and hype (remember goji berries? Maca root? Coconut oil? Flaxseed? Chia? Kale?). Now, a new contender is here for the superfood crown: resistant starch, especially in the form of raw potato starch. If you haven’t encountered enthusiastic advice to add potato starch (just stirred into a glass of cool water, yum?!) to your diet in order to treat all manner of ills, you probably will soon!

Resistant starch is a type of highly-fermentable insoluble fiber. Unlike most starches, resistant starch isn’t fully broken down in your small intestine. It “resists” the action of your digestive enzymes because of its molecular structure; and instead of being a source of slow-burning carbohydrates for you, it becomes food for specific types of bacteria in your colon (which ferment it to produce beneficial short-chain fatty acids like acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid).

There are four main categories of resistant starch:

RS1: starch that resists digestion because it’s trapped by intact plant cell walls (in legumes, grains, and seeds)

RS2: starch that’s protected from digestion because of its molecular structure, and only becomes accessible to human digestive enzymes after being cooked (this one’s found in raw potatoes, green bananas, and raw plantains)

RS3: also called “retrograded starch,” which forms when you cool down certain starchy foods after they’ve been cooked (such as potatoes, rice, and other grains)

RS4: chemically modified starches that don’t occur in nature, but are created to resist digestion

If you’ve read my Fiber Manifesto (which you can find here, here, here, here, and here!), you already know that I’m a big fan of insoluble fiber for the host of benefits it provides. Fiber in general has been linked to reduced risk of diabetes, heart disease, and multiple cancers. It reduces inflammation, regulates hormones, and helps protect against many gut pathologies. And looking at the research on resistant starch in particular, it’s not hard to see why it’s becoming so heavily promoted as a supplement, especially in the paleo community. Both human and animal studies have confirmed a number of legitimate benefits, including improved insulin sensitivity (and lower blood sugar responses after high-carb meals), reduced hunger/better satiation, improved blood lipids, and even better immunity (due to the influence of resistant starch on immune cell production and inflammatory compounds in the gut).

Sounds pretty great, right? Let’s toast with our glasses or potato starch stirred into water!

Er, or not. There’s another side of the resistant starch story that hasn’t received as much airtime: the consequences of supplementing with an isolated starch, rather than eating resistant starch as it naturally occurs in whole foods (mixed with other compounds that all work in concert). It turns out that, while whole food sources of resistant starch may be a health boon to the body, supplementation of concentrated sources of resistant starch—which is becoming all-the-rage in the low-carb, ketogenic diet, alternative health and primal/paleo communities—isn’t such a good idea.

Let’s evaluate resistant starch supplementation objectively by turning away from the hype and instead looking at the science.

Effects of Isolated Resistant Starch: Location, Location, Location

As already mentioned, an array of studies prove that resistant starch provides tremendous benefits to our health. In addition to some of the more overt effects, like improved blood sugar regulation and cardiovascular disease risk factors, resistant starch can improve general health in more subtle, yet perhaps more profound, ways. For example, resistant starch can help increase absorption and bioavailability of many essential minerals from the diet, including: calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and copper. Of course, other kinds of fiber can do this too, but this is likely one reason why supplementation with resistant starch can protect bone density during weight loss and positively impact the immune system.

Yet, multiple studies have highlighted the importance of consuming resistant starch in combination with other types of fermentable carbohydrate. This is important because these studies demonstrate the necessity to focus on whole food sources of resistant starch rather than jumping on the bandwagon with a supplement focus.

One study on pigs (whose large bowel is similar enough to humans’ to make the results worth reading about!) found that RS2 alone gets rapidly fermented in the proximal (beginning) part of the colon, but fails to reach further down into the distal (lower) colon. That’s bad news if we’re trying to achieve maximum cancer protection: the lower parts of the colon are where tumors occur the most often, and flooding the area with plenty of butyrate (produced by bacterial fermentation of resistant starch) can help inhibit the growth and differentiation of colon cancer cells.

But, in that same study, adding wheat bran (a soluble non-starch polysaccharide) to the pigs’ diet nearly doubled the amount of resistant starch getting fermented between the lower colon and feces. Basically, the bulk from the wheat bran helped carry fermentation further through the colon, spreading cancer-protective butyrate in the process (and providing some other perks along the way, like lower ammonia concentrations—something we don’t see in studies that use RS2 alone).

Another study, this one on humans, found something similar when wheat seed (RS1) was added to supplemental RS2 (in the form of green banana flour and high-amylose maize). The addition of wheat seed helped spread fermentation throughout the entire colon, as indicated by a decrease in fecal pH (which is a good thing!). In contrast, nearly all studies using RS2 on its own (from potato starch, high-amylose maize, and other sources) fail to show that fermentation reaches anywhere other than the very upper part of the colon.

So, does that mean you should add wheat to your diet to boost your gut health and cut your disease risk? No way! What these studies demonstrate isn’t that we should tinker with the effects of one isolated carbohydrate by adding another isolated carbohydrate on top of it, but instead, that resistant starches work in harmony with other dietary components to exert their full benefits. That’s another point in favor of eating resistant starch in whole-food form, since it already comes packaged with a variety of soluble and insoluble fibers (not to mention essential vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals!) to keep your gut (and the rest of you!) healthy.

The Problem of Selectively Feeding Certain Bacteria

Another concern with aggressively supplementing with resistant starch (especially potato starch) is what happens to the composition of your gut microbiome. Different strains of bacteria have specific substrates they like to munch on, and while some are happy to dine on RS2, others prefer different forms of fiber. When we consume unnaturally high (e.g., supplemented) levels of one type of resistant starch (or one type of any fiber), we risk selectively feeding certain strains of bacteria while lowering the proportion of other beneficial kinds. Even beneficial probiotic strains of bacteria can overgrow, and this is especially a concern when this comes at the expense of microbial diversity—while much remains unknown about the optimum gut microbiome, one thing we know for sure is that a diverse microbiome is a resilient and healthy one.

A great paper examining this effect is from 2014, titled “Impacts of plant-based foods in ancestral hominin diets on the metabolism and function of gut microbiota in vitro.” In this study, a raw potato diet (RS2) caused human-derived fecal communities to show a major rise in Bacteroides and Eubacterium rectale (beneficial bacteria that thrive on RS2), due to the diet over-feeding them with their preferred food source. But, the raw potato diet also suppressed levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli—two types of beneficial bacteria that favor RS3 over RS2 and which enjoy other fiber types like inulin. For people supplementing with potato starch, or other isolated resistant starches (and especially at the expense of a diet that includes varied fiber sources), we might expect to see a similar change in microbiome composition, including a loss of certain bacteria that typically benefit our health.

Hypothetically, if you’ve had a stool test to analyze your gut microbiome, this property of resistant starch could be exploited to produce rapid correction of certain undesirable bacterial genus patterns with a short-term supplementation course. Certainly, some practitioners are using potato starch supplementation as one tool in an arsenal to correct gut dysbiosis. Caution is advised even with medically-supervised resistant starch supplementation however (read on for more on why whole foods sources of resistant starch are still a preferable strategy), and I encourage detailed conversations with your practitioner about whether or not this is the best approach for you.

There’s another concern for anyone with gastrointestinal symptoms. Even proponents of resistant starch supplementation caution its use for those with Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO). Although, let’s be clear: how resistant starch may exacerbate SIBO has never been evaluated in a scientific study. It remains unknown whether resistant starch could propel an overgrowth of bacteria higher up the digestive tract by providing such a highly fermentable substrate where microbial density is supposed to be only a fraction of what it is in the large intestine. However, studies in both dogs and humans show that resistant start is fermented by bacteria in the ileum (the last segment of the small intestine before the large intestine), producing mainly butyrate and acetate short-chain fatty acids. So, while this “caution” has yet to be scientifically validated, it is certainly possible.

How Resistant Starch Enhances Tumor Growth

Now, for something a little more alarming. Several studies have demonstrated that, after exposure to a carcinogen, RS2 can actually enhance tumor growth (if it’s not accompanied by other forms of dietary fiber). Yikes, right? One study using a rat model of colorectal cancer found that raw potato starch supplementation led to larger and more frequent tumors, compared to a low-resistant starch control diet. (After 20 weeks, 88% of the rats eating potato starch had tumors, compared to 74% of the rats on a control diet, and their tumor size averaged 191 mm2 compared to 87 mm2 on the control diet.) Here’s the kicker though: when the rats were given potato starch plus wheat bran, those tumor-enhancing effects were suppressed (only 56% of the rats got tumors and the average tumor size was back down to 85 mm2). In other words, a soluble fiber coupled with resistant starch seemed to counteract the increased tumorigenesis.

Another study using a mouse model had a very similar outcome. In this experiment, carcinogen-exposed mice were fed different diets enhanced with aspirin, two forms of RS2 (raw potato starch and high-amylose corn), or a conventional rodent chow diet. Mice receiving the resistant starch had a significantly higher number of intestinal tumors than mice on any of the non-RS diets. (Interestingly, the addition of aspirin suppressed that effect—even though aspirin alone didn’t appear to have any anti-tumor properties.) And yet another rat study found that resistant starch from either potato starch or high-amylose corn increased the absorption of a dietary carcinogen in the heterocyclic amine family—something humans are also exposed to.

Could this problem just be limited to rodents, though? While the majority of animal research does translate to humans, certainly not all of it does which is why studies in animals do need to be taken with a grain of salt. Unfortunately, in this case, it doesn’t look like we can get away with the “but that’s just in rats” justification to dismiss a scientific study. In a human study using controlled diets enriched with either RS2 (from high-amylose maize) or cornstarch, RS2 significantly increased the amount of DNA adducts in the colonic mucosa, which is a biomarker for the formation of colorectal cancer. The average number of adduct levels went from 2.69 during the study’s low-RS period up to 3.83 during the high-RS period. That points to the potential of certain forms of resistant starch having a tumor-enhancing effect rather than a tumor-protective effect.

Keep in mind, this definitely isn’t the same as saying “resistant starch causes cancer!” In these studies, a potent carcinogen was used to kick off the process of cancer initiation, and RS2 just served to promote growth once it had started. But, that’s still a potentially dangerous situation, and it should serve as a warning that supplementing with isolated resistant starch may carry unforeseen risks—especially if it’s not carefully balanced by other soluble and insoluble fibers.

More Benefits with Fewer Risks: Whole Foods!

There’s little doubt that resistant starches play a beneficial role in our diet, and can go a long way in supporting healthy intestinal flora. In fact, the reduction in resistant-starch-rich foods may be a major reason low-carbohydrate diets tend to alter the gut microbiome in unfavorable ways (along with reductions in other fermentable fibers). But, we need to be careful when generalizing the effects of resistant starch in its whole-food form (potatoes, root veggies, bananas, plantains, etc.) to its effects as an isolated supplement. Unfortunately, the way potato starch supplementation is currently touted, as a gut microbiome-enhancing substitute for eating a variety of vegetables and fruit, doesn’t look like a strategy that lives up to the hype.

So far, the science suggests that resistant starch, especially RS2, exerts the most benefits when consumed with additional fermentable carbohydrates, soluble fibers that add fecal bulk, and perhaps other dietary components that enhance its positive effects while counteracting its negative ones.

Does this mean that all you have to do is add your potato starch to a breakfast smoothie that contains spinach and berries too? The research so far can’t tell us what the threshold amount of resistant starch relative to other fibers and carbohydrates is for optimal benefits (and avoiding detriments). It’s likely that all of the negative effects of resistant starch supplementation discussed here are non-issues when potato starch is added to a diet already rich in a variety of vegetables and fruits (although, if you are eating a diet rich in a variety of vegetables and fruits, chances are good that your microbiome is doing well without additional supplementation). The bigger caution here is for those using potato starch as a substitute for vegetables and fruits in their diets.

The best solution? Eat resistant starch where it naturally occurs! Cooked potatoes (which contain RS2 and RS3, of course, there’s even more RS2 in cooked and cooled potatoes), raw green bananas, plantains, yams, and other root vegetables provide not only resistant starch, but also a variety of other fibers and micronutrients that benefit health. Raw potato starch may be convenient, but in the long run, it’s less likely to benefit your health than eating resistant-starch-rich whole foods.
It seems that the issue of RS supplementation in the form of an isolated supplement is up for debate. You can follow the link to the article above, and read the comment section. I'm just copying the first comment below:

Hi.
I’m the guy that started this whole RS “movement” a couple of years ago. I fully agree that RS should not be taken in isolation, meaning, in the absence of real food fibers. But I think that raw potato starch is an excellent addition to an otherwise sound diet.

From the very beginning of the research into the benefits of RS, bad advice has been given. Even this article has numerous errors, ie, the last paragraph, which is the ‘takeaway’.:

“The best solution? Eat resistant starch where it naturally occurs! Cooked potatoes (which contain RS2 and RS3, of course, there’s even more RS2 in cooked and cooled potatoes), raw green bananas, plantains, yams, and other root vegetables provide not only resistant starch, but also a variety of other fibers and micronutrients that benefit health. Raw potato starch may be convenient, but in the long run, it’s less likely to benefit your health than eating resistant-starch-rich whole foods.”

Here’s the rub with RS…
1 medium potato, tennis ball sized, 150g or so, can be looked at like this in terms of resistant starch:
Raw – 22g (RS2)
Cooked – .25g (RS3 for the rest)
Cooled – 3.5g
Re-heated – 4g
Re-cooled – 4.5g
Re-re-heated – 5g
Re-re-cooled – 5.5g
Re-re-re-heated – 6g

After cooking, there is no RS2 any longer. The only way to get RS2 is to get it from uncooked starches, ie. raw potato or raw potato starch.

Consider, please, that 1TBS of raw potato starch nearly triples the fiber intake for almost every American. And not just any fiber, but a proven Bifidogenic fiber.

If there is anyone out there advocating raw potato starch to the exclusion of real plant food, it did not originate from me or my blog.

If people are still totally aghast at taking an “isolated starch” then there are other options, but your cooked and cooled potatoes are not the powerhouse of RS2 you portray (in fact have none). Raw potatoes are a great source of RS2. Very green bananas, also. Green plantains, sliced thinly and dried, are a great snack.

As a general rule, I try to cook and cool all of the starchy foods I eat (potatoes, beans, rice, etc…). This increases the RS3 a bit, but it will barely contribute more than 3-5g per day. But very little bit helps!

RS2 is a GREAT prebiotic! Your insistence otherwise is a disservice to your readers, IMHO.

The “RS2 increases cancer tumors” papers need to be read very carefully. The RS2 was used because of its colonocyte stimulating properties. To somehow twist this into a negative aspect of RS2 is very Konstatin Monastyrsky-esque.

I suggest, read the papers that show the immune modulating, butyrate producing, healthy colonocyte inducing, bifidogenic properties of RS2, then compare RS2 amounts found in anyone’s diet (hint: almost none), and then look at the amount of RS2 found in 1TBS of raw potato starch, which can easily be had from organic sources, or made at home, if one desires.

For dysbiotic guts, all bets are off, however. And this is not unique to RS2 or any RS source. Guts ravaged by antibiotics or poor diet are very hard to recover from.
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think for a healthy thyroid/gut and digestive system, resistant starch may be a viable option. However, from the research I have been doing lately, it seems that when SIBO/dysbiosis/thyroid issues are present, resistant starch can feed bacteria to produce lipopolysacharride (endotoxin). Endotoxin increases the production of serotonin (which is actually looking like a stress hormone more than anything), estrogen and prolactin, all of which inhibit thyroid function, increase stress hormones, and thereby limit energy available to intestinal cells - inducing a glycolytic/low energy state, which basically leads to leaky gut.
Ray Peat quotes:
“Bacterial endotoxin increases serotonin release from the intestine, and increases its synthesis in the brain (Nolan, et al., 2000) and liver (Bado, 1983). It also stimulates its release from platelets, and reduces the lungs’ ability to destroy it. The formation of serotonin in the intestine is also stimulated by the lactate, propionate and butyrate that are formed by bacteria fermenting fiber and starch, but these bacteria also produce endotoxin. The inflammation-producing effects of lactate, serotonin, and endotoxin are overlapping, additive, and sometimes synergistic, along with histamine, nitric oxide, bradykinin, and the cytokines.

“The upper part of the small intestine is sterile in healthy people. In the last 40 years, there has been increasing interest in the “contaminated small-bowel syndrome,” or the “small intestine bacterial overgrowth syndrome.” When peristalsis is reduced, for example by hypothyroidism, along with reduced secretion of digestive fluids, bacteria are able to thrive in the upper part of the intestine. Sugars are very quickly absorbed in the upper intestine, so starches and fibers normally provide most of the nourishment for bowel bacteria…Thyroid hormone increases digestive activity, including stomach acid and peristalsis, and both thyroid and progesterone increase the ability of the intestine to absorb sugars quickly; their deficiency can permit bacteria to live on sugars as well as starches.
snippets from this article: http://www.forefronthealth.com/hypothyroidism-and-anxiety/?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=postplanner&utm_source=facebook.com#part3

In reality, serotonin is a primitive stress hormone.
In your intestines and blood, serotonin influences digestion, appetite, muscle contractions and more.

In excess in your intestines, serotonin causes IBS, leaky gut, diarrhea, and nausea.In your brain, serotonin influences your mood, emotions, sexual desire, social behavior, and more. In excess (in your brain), serotonin activates your reptilian brain’s “fight or flight” response. When serotonin activates your “flight or flight” response, the result is anxiety and/or panic.

The Hypothyroidism-Serotonin Anxiety Cycle



Hypothyroidism and serotonin have a unique relationship. Hypothyroidism promotes the over-production of serotonin. And the over-production of serotonin further suppresses your thyroid. This creates one of many dangerous hypothyroidism cycles. And it’s dangerous cycles like this that keep you trapped in your hypothyroidism.

Research shows that hypothyroidism causes:
-Increased intestinal bacteria and bacterial endotoxin
-Increased stress hormone production
-Increased estrogen production and decreased estrogen detoxification
-Decreased digestion


All these effects of hypothyroidism are known to increase serotonin production. Research also shows that elevated serotonin causes:
-Increased stress hormone production
-Increased estrogen
-Increased prolactin
-Increased inflammatory histamine

All these effects of serotonin are known to further suppress thyroid function.

1. Eat More Gelatin and Less Muscle Meat
Most people today get most of their protein from meat. Yet, the protein in meat isn’t exactly balanced for optimal thyroid function.Muscle meats contain high amounts of the amino acid tryptophan. And in hypothyroidism, tryptophan is readily converted into serotonin.

Using protein sources containing little tryptophan has been shown to help lower serotonin levels.

A new method for rapidly and simultaneously decreasing serotonin and catecholamine synthesis in humans:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC257796/
“The administration of amino acid (AA) mixtures that are selectively deficient either in tryptophan or phenylalanine plus tyrosine can decrease serotonin or catecholamine synthesis, respectively.

One simple way to do this is to use more gelatin (collagen) in your diet, which contains no tryptophan. Gelatin also acts on GABA receptors in the brain, which can have a calming effect and improve sleep. Gelatin is a high-quality and anti-inflammatory protein source. And it has been used for thousands of years in traditional cultures. It’s also the most abundant form of protein found in your body. Today, many people consume gelatin in the form of bone broth.

2. Don’t Forget Your Coffee (Caffeine)

In other articles, I’ve written about the many therapeutic effects of coffee. I’ve noted many ways it helps to improve thyroid function and metabolism. Yet, this is one therapeutic benefit I’ve yet to discuss.

As Dr. Raymond Peat points out, coffee (caffeine) helps to inactivate serotonin. And this is the reason behind some of coffee’s mood lifting effects.
“coffee stimulates the uptake (inactivation or storage) of serotonin, increases metabolic energy, and tends to improve mood. In animal studies, it reverses the state of helplessness or despair, often more effectively than so-called antidepressants.” Caffeine also helps inhibit serotonin’s actions at the cell receptors in the brain. This helps to weaken the effects of serotonin on the brain.

3. Cut Back On Your Dietary Fiber

High-fiber foods tend to increase both endotoxin and serotonin production in the intestines. Studies show that hypothyroidism leads to Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO). And this bacterial overgrowth loves to feed on fiber. This increases endotoxin in the intestines, which further increases serotonin. High-fiber foods can also create a lot of friction along the intestinal walls. And it’s this friction within your intestines that also stimulates more serotonin production.
Reducing your fiber intake can help to keep serotonin levels lower.
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
From a "bioenergetic" standpoint (approaching cell physiology from Gilbert Ling/G. Pollack's evidence base), it posits that leaky gut issues are essentially due to a systemic lack of energy available to the cell (possibly due to inhibited thyroid function from what I understand), whereby the cell can no longer structure water and expel toxins, and begins to accumulate "bulk water". In a capillary setting, this essentially causes permeability and allows or endotoxin/undigested protein/bacterial metabolites into the blood stream.

From what I can see, Peat's work is based around the understanding that "Structure and Function are interdependent on every level" - and that basically both are determined by the energy status of the cell. When energy is high, the physiology can adapt to stressful environments. However, when energy is low, pathology ensues. It seems that Peat's work is focused primarily on the thyroid and how this organ affects every other system, because it is the main controller of energy status.

This would make sense why people who go on low carb/ketogenic diets, who are unable to utilise fat properly for energy, may develop food sensitivities and gut issues. The lack of energy provided to the cell induces this stressed-state and leads to problems.

Laura, the more I read about it all, it is making me think about what the C's have told you in the sessions about the PTB tampering with your thyroid gland. It seems this may be one of the most important organs to fix, because of its systemic control of energy availability/metabolism.
 

Shared Joy

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I happened to find this method for improving thyroid gland function.

I haven't given a try before, but maybe somebody else did or have some observations to add.

_http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/3-Food-Thyroid-Boosting-Daily-Protocol.pdf

it is a combination of salted orange juice, coffee with cream and butter, which have to be taken together.

This daily protocol you are about to discover uses three simple foods, which when used together
(the SOBC Method) provide an exponential or triple-thyroid-boosting effect...
1. Boosts your active T3 thyroid hormone level.
2. Boosts your cell receptors and your cells’ ability to use more thyroid hormone.
3. Boosts your metabolism so you can use thyroid hormone more efficiently.
...

1.Salted Orange Juice

The combination of salt and orange juice boosts your liver’s conversion of thyroid hormone resulting in an increase in active T3 thyroid
hormone.

Both salt and sugar are essential to stop your stress response and lower both your adrenaline and cortisol.
This combination of salt and orange juice is an ideal thyroid-booster. It's rich in fructose, potassium,magnesium, and sodium... all of which are necessary for regulating blood sugar and increasing your liver’s conversion of thyroid hormone.

This is also why orange juice has been shown to provide an ideal source of energy for those suffering with diabetes, which is also commonly found among hypothyroidism sufferers.

Special Considerations for Orange Juice
If you find the orange juice too acidic, then adding a pinch of baking soda will help neutralize the acidity while increasing the beneficial effect. It does this by increasing your CO2 (carbon dioxide) levels, which improves metabolism.
It's worth noting that low CO2 levels are a telltale sign of hypothyroidism and a major cause of slow poor metabolism among hypothyroidism sufferers.

Daily - 8 oz. (237 ml) orange juice combined with 1/8 tsp. (0.62 ml) non-iodized salt.

2.Fresh Butter

The higher concentrations of butyric acid in butter, boosts the number of thyroid hormone receptors of your cells allowing you to use more
thyroid hormone.

Butter contains a high concentration of butyric acid, which is known for boosting your thyroid function by increasing the number of your thyroid hormone cell receptors, allowing your cells to use more thyroid hormone.

1/4 to 1/2 tbsp. (4 to 7 ml) butter with breakfast. Butter should be used throughout the day for best results.

3.Fresh Coffee

Coffee acts similarly to thyroid hormone in your body boosting your metabolism and lowering your requirement of thyroid while preventing
thyroid related diseases.

While coffee does boost your thyroid function, particularly by activating thyroid hormone secretion,its therapeutic effects extend far beyond that.
What makes coffee particularly beneficial is that it acts much like thyroid hormone, increasing metabolism and energy production the same way thyroid hormone does.
In other words, when thyroid hormone is low, coffee can act as a direct replacement.
This means it provides protection against disease caused by hypothyroidism. In fact, coffee and caffeine have been shown to protective against thyroid disease], cancer , Parkinson's disease [12], liver dysfunction [13], and death from all causes [14].
Coffee also increases blood flow improving nutrient and thyroid hormone delivery to your cells.
And its beneficial metabolic effects and high magnesium content also help you to use thyroid hormone more efficiently

4 oz. (118 ml) dark roast coffee with 4 oz. (118 ml) whole milk or 2 oz. (59 ml) cream (carrageenan-free).
...
Too much coffee without enough nutritional support will just lower your blood sugar, increase adrenaline, and leave you feeling jittery and anxious.
To avoid this, always have coffee with a meal containing carbohydrate and fat. And the amount of coffee one can tolerate differs from person to person based on nutritional status. It's better to start with a smaller amount of coffee and increase the amount you use over time.
...........

1. All 3 Foods must be used together at the same time.
2. This daily protocol is best used in the morning with breakfast for best results.
3. Sip on the salted orange juice and coffee slowly for best results. Never drink fast.
4. This protocol can be used multiple times a day. However, caution should be taken as some people are sensitive to having coffee too late in the day, which can negatively affect sleep.
5. Adjust the amount of coffee you use according to your response. Too much coffee can lower your blood sugar and leave you feeling jittery and anxious. In this case, simply use less coffee and more orange juice.

Interpreting YourResults

How you respond to this thyroid-boosting daily protocol will tell you a lot about the state of your thyroid and health.

If done properly, you should feel relaxed and calm with a clear mind and an increased level of energy.
You may also feel warmer with a rise in body temperature and oftentimes pulse rate.
While most will respond this way, there are some who may respond differently,and for good reason.
As mentioned, many hypothyroidism sufferers compensate by overproducing adrenaline.
Adrenaline itself is very excitatory and oftentimes makes you feel energized but oftentimes to the point that you cannot relax.
If you constantly have to be moving and can't sit down, like some of my clients, then this is often a telltale sign.

In this case, you can oftentimes be very sensitive to coffee, which can make you feel jittery and anxious. So, it's best to decrease the amount of coffee you are using to avoid this affect.
If you find that this protocol makes you crash, then this is a telltale sign that your diet is not adequate and you need to increase your nutrition.
It's important to understand that in either of these cases, the thyroid-boosting daily protocol is not the cause of the problem. It's simply showing you the imbalances that must be addressed.
For more information on how to incorporate this protocol into your diet, please see these recipes and meal plan.
Just 1 cent contribution
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Yesterday PoB made three loaves of bread using 1/3rd each of potato starch, rice flour, spelt flour. Water, butter, yeast and salt were the only other ingredients. I had a slice of it late yesterday afternoon. I could feel fermentation in my lower digestive tract at around 11 pm, and this morning, all proceeded as it ought. So, I would say that it was a successful experiment. Going to try it next time with half rice and half potato starch and see if it makes as well. This may be a good way to get the resistant starches into the system while still keeping the carbs very low.
 

Adaryn

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Z said:
Not sure about spelt. Most sources say it contains gluten.
It does, though less than wheat and most other grains:

Spelt doesn't contain quite as much gluten as modern wheat, and it's actually a slightly different type of gluten. Nonetheless, if you have issues with gluten-containing foods, you'll want to avoid spelt, or you'll risk getting sick (many people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity have reported getting ill after mistakenly eating something with spelt in it).
_https://www.verywell.com/is-spelt-really-gluten-free-562377

Kesser and others recommend starting slow with the resistant starch (also, we should be cautious about what source of RS to select). I'd guess it's specially true for those with gut issues/leaky gut (as Keyhole pointed out). So careful about where the RS is coming from, proceed slowly and in small quantities first, and see how it goes.
 

Charade

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Shared Joy said:
I happened to find this method for improving thyroid gland function.

I haven't given a try before, but maybe somebody else did or have some observations to add.

_http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/3-Food-Thyroid-Boosting-Daily-Protocol.pdf

it is a combination of salted orange juice, coffee with cream and butter, which have to be taken together.

This daily protocol you are about to discover uses three simple foods, which when used together
(the SOBC Method) provide an exponential or triple-thyroid-boosting effect...
1. Boosts your active T3 thyroid hormone level.
2. Boosts your cell receptors and your cells’ ability to use more thyroid hormone.
3. Boosts your metabolism so you can use thyroid hormone more efficiently.
...

1.Salted Orange Juice

The combination of salt and orange juice boosts your liver’s conversion of thyroid hormone resulting in an increase in active T3 thyroid
hormone.

Both salt and sugar are essential to stop your stress response and lower both your adrenaline and cortisol.
This combination of salt and orange juice is an ideal thyroid-booster. It's rich in fructose, potassium,magnesium, and sodium... all of which are necessary for regulating blood sugar and increasing your liver’s conversion of thyroid hormone.

This is also why orange juice has been shown to provide an ideal source of energy for those suffering with diabetes, which is also commonly found among hypothyroidism sufferers.

Special Considerations for Orange Juice
If you find the orange juice too acidic, then adding a pinch of baking soda will help neutralize the acidity while increasing the beneficial effect. It does this by increasing your CO2 (carbon dioxide) levels, which improves metabolism.
It's worth noting that low CO2 levels are a telltale sign of hypothyroidism and a major cause of slow poor metabolism among hypothyroidism sufferers.

Daily - 8 oz. (237 ml) orange juice combined with 1/8 tsp. (0.62 ml) non-iodized salt.

2.Fresh Butter

The higher concentrations of butyric acid in butter, boosts the number of thyroid hormone receptors of your cells allowing you to use more
thyroid hormone.

Butter contains a high concentration of butyric acid, which is known for boosting your thyroid function by increasing the number of your thyroid hormone cell receptors, allowing your cells to use more thyroid hormone.

1/4 to 1/2 tbsp. (4 to 7 ml) butter with breakfast. Butter should be used throughout the day for best results.

3.Fresh Coffee

Coffee acts similarly to thyroid hormone in your body boosting your metabolism and lowering your requirement of thyroid while preventing
thyroid related diseases.

While coffee does boost your thyroid function, particularly by activating thyroid hormone secretion,its therapeutic effects extend far beyond that.
What makes coffee particularly beneficial is that it acts much like thyroid hormone, increasing metabolism and energy production the same way thyroid hormone does.
In other words, when thyroid hormone is low, coffee can act as a direct replacement.
This means it provides protection against disease caused by hypothyroidism. In fact, coffee and caffeine have been shown to protective against thyroid disease], cancer , Parkinson's disease [12], liver dysfunction [13], and death from all causes [14].
Coffee also increases blood flow improving nutrient and thyroid hormone delivery to your cells.
And its beneficial metabolic effects and high magnesium content also help you to use thyroid hormone more efficiently

4 oz. (118 ml) dark roast coffee with 4 oz. (118 ml) whole milk or 2 oz. (59 ml) cream (carrageenan-free).
...
Too much coffee without enough nutritional support will just lower your blood sugar, increase adrenaline, and leave you feeling jittery and anxious.
To avoid this, always have coffee with a meal containing carbohydrate and fat. And the amount of coffee one can tolerate differs from person to person based on nutritional status. It's better to start with a smaller amount of coffee and increase the amount you use over time.
...........

1. All 3 Foods must be used together at the same time.
2. This daily protocol is best used in the morning with breakfast for best results.
3. Sip on the salted orange juice and coffee slowly for best results. Never drink fast.
4. This protocol can be used multiple times a day. However, caution should be taken as some people are sensitive to having coffee too late in the day, which can negatively affect sleep.
5. Adjust the amount of coffee you use according to your response. Too much coffee can lower your blood sugar and leave you feeling jittery and anxious. In this case, simply use less coffee and more orange juice.

Interpreting YourResults

How you respond to this thyroid-boosting daily protocol will tell you a lot about the state of your thyroid and health.

If done properly, you should feel relaxed and calm with a clear mind and an increased level of energy.
You may also feel warmer with a rise in body temperature and oftentimes pulse rate.
While most will respond this way, there are some who may respond differently,and for good reason.
As mentioned, many hypothyroidism sufferers compensate by overproducing adrenaline.
Adrenaline itself is very excitatory and oftentimes makes you feel energized but oftentimes to the point that you cannot relax.
If you constantly have to be moving and can't sit down, like some of my clients, then this is often a telltale sign.

In this case, you can oftentimes be very sensitive to coffee, which can make you feel jittery and anxious. So, it's best to decrease the amount of coffee you are using to avoid this affect.
If you find that this protocol makes you crash, then this is a telltale sign that your diet is not adequate and you need to increase your nutrition.
It's important to understand that in either of these cases, the thyroid-boosting daily protocol is not the cause of the problem. It's simply showing you the imbalances that must be addressed.
For more information on how to incorporate this protocol into your diet, please see these recipes and meal plan.
Just 1 cent contribution

Keyhole said:
From a "bioenergetic" standpoint (approaching cell physiology from Gilbert Ling/G. Pollack's evidence base), it posits that leaky gut issues are essentially due to a systemic lack of energy available to the cell (possibly due to inhibited thyroid function from what I understand), whereby the cell can no longer structure water and expel toxins, and begins to accumulate "bulk water". In a capillary setting, this essentially causes permeability and allows or endotoxin/undigested protein/bacterial metabolites into the blood stream.

From what I can see, Peat's work is based around the understanding that "Structure and Function are interdependent on every level" - and that basically both are determined by the energy status of the cell. When energy is high, the physiology can adapt to stressful environments. However, when energy is low, pathology ensues. It seems that Peat's work is focused primarily on the thyroid and how this organ affects every other system, because it is the main controller of energy status.

This would make sense why people who go on low carb/ketogenic diets, who are unable to utilise fat properly for energy, may develop food sensitivities and gut issues. The lack of energy provided to the cell induces this stressed-state and leads to problems.

Laura, the more I read about it all, it is making me think about what the C's have told you in the sessions about the PTB tampering with your thyroid gland. It seems this may be one of the most important organs to fix, because of its systemic control of energy availability/metabolism.
Shared Joy

Thank you for posting this thyroid protocol. I will give it a go and report reactions. I've been wondering if my thyroid is working well. This looks easy for me adapt to my routine. I haven't drunk OJ for years. Nor do I eat breakfast. Usually one or two meals later in the day. But eating too late has become an issue. I do like to use the food I've eaten before eating again, so intermittent fast is daily for me already.

Day 1: 10AM Wow Bacon, 2 eggs, a homemade non gluten, banana-blueberry muffin. OJ w/salt. Coffee with coconut oil and ghee and cream.

Great energy and felt very up which was great since it was a long 12 hour day at work. Emotionally I have felt way more 'up', happier, more giving, enthusiastic. This has been the best result.

Ate 1/2 a bacon, almond butter sprouted wheat sandwich (Ezekial Bread) *no PUFAS. Coffee w/ghee and cream and salted OJ. This was at 7PM. If I could have eaten earlier I would have but not starving, just felt refuel needed.

I am experimenting with this brand of bread, only for ease of portable food options. I don't eat it everyday by any stretch and honestly don't miss bread in my diet. I've read in John Keel's book, THE INVISIBLE DIET, that sprouted wheat acts as a vegetable instead of as a grain making it more digestible. So far no painful problems digesting like with regular wheat. no gas issues either.

I am also reading Dr Douillard's book for info on the lymph system. Not to push his ideas but seeing if any of it is useful about gut healing.

A one week + update. I have enjoyed this eating protocol. I must say my energy has been up, not jittery or crashing. Very good. I don't get hungry more than once a day. It was never my habit to eat in the morning. Switching the routine seems to be better. My trouble is that I don't always have time to eat in the AM. But I stuck to it when possible. I have not lost any weight doing this, which would be nice. I am planning to have some hormone testing done to evaluate recent weight gain.

I am actually cooling off a bit rather than heating up. The hot flashes are subsiding a bit, although, I have liked bring too hot since it's winter. :lol:
I like that it has given structure to eating and taken the stress out of what to eat.

I intend to continue this eating regimen and will report any changes.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I stumbled upon a great example which shows how carb grains are so bad in the book "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World" by Jack Weatherford. It describes in detail the time period of Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and beyond when the Mongols conquered regions of Asia and Europe. It says,

The mongols drank horses' blood and carried strips of dried meat and dried curd with him that he could chew while riding; and when he had fresh meat, but no time to cook it, he put the raw flesh under his saddle so it would soon be softened and edible.

The Chinese noted with surprise and disgust the ability of the Mongol warriors to survive on little food and water for long periods; according to one, the entire army could camp without a single puff of smoke since they needed no fires to cook.
The grain diet of the [Chinese] peasant warriors stunted their bones, rotted their teeth, and left them weak and prone to disease. In contrast, the poorest Mongol soldier ate mostly protein, thereby giving him strong teeth and bones. Unlike the Jurched [Chinese] soldiers, who were dependent on a heavy carbohydrate diet, the Mongols could more easily go a day or two without food.

Traditional armies moved in long columns of men marching the same route with their large supplies of food following them. By contrast, the Mongol army spread out over a vast area to provide sufficient pasture for the animals and to maximize hunting opportunities for the soldiers.
The book also describes the climate of the Asian territory which made the Mongols thrive relatively unharmed from infectious diseases. In contrast, when they went to a humid territory, they would get infectious diseases, making them retreat to drier and colder climates where they thrived. Thought that was interesting.
 

marek760

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Gaby said:
I stumbled upon a great example which shows how carb grains are so bad in the book "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World" by Jack Weatherford. It describes in detail the time period of Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and beyond when the Mongols conquered regions of Asia and Europe. It says,

The mongols drank horses' blood and carried strips of dried meat and dried curd with him that he could chew while riding; and when he had fresh meat, but no time to cook it, he put the raw flesh under his saddle so it would soon be softened and edible.

The Chinese noted with surprise and disgust the ability of the Mongol warriors to survive on little food and water for long periods; according to one, the entire army could camp without a single puff of smoke since they needed no fires to cook.
The grain diet of the [Chinese] peasant warriors stunted their bones, rotted their teeth, and left them weak and prone to disease. In contrast, the poorest Mongol soldier ate mostly protein, thereby giving him strong teeth and bones. Unlike the Jurched [Chinese] soldiers, who were dependent on a heavy carbohydrate diet, the Mongols could more easily go a day or two without food.

Traditional armies moved in long columns of men marching the same route with their large supplies of food following them. By contrast, the Mongol army spread out over a vast area to provide sufficient pasture for the animals and to maximize hunting opportunities for the soldiers.
The book also describes the climate of the Asian territory which made the Mongols thrive relatively unharmed from infectious diseases. In contrast, when they went to a humid territory, they would get infectious diseases, making them retreat to drier and colder climates where they thrived. Thought that was interesting.
Thank you Gaby, that is really interesting, I will look for this book next time I'll be at my local library
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
marek760 said:
Gaby said:
I stumbled upon a great example which shows how carb grains are so bad in the book "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World" by Jack Weatherford. It describes in detail the time period of Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and beyond when the Mongols conquered regions of Asia and Europe. It says,

The mongols drank horses' blood and carried strips of dried meat and dried curd with him that he could chew while riding; and when he had fresh meat, but no time to cook it, he put the raw flesh under his saddle so it would soon be softened and edible.

The Chinese noted with surprise and disgust the ability of the Mongol warriors to survive on little food and water for long periods; according to one, the entire army could camp without a single puff of smoke since they needed no fires to cook.
The grain diet of the [Chinese] peasant warriors stunted their bones, rotted their teeth, and left them weak and prone to disease. In contrast, the poorest Mongol soldier ate mostly protein, thereby giving him strong teeth and bones. Unlike the Jurched [Chinese] soldiers, who were dependent on a heavy carbohydrate diet, the Mongols could more easily go a day or two without food.

Traditional armies moved in long columns of men marching the same route with their large supplies of food following them. By contrast, the Mongol army spread out over a vast area to provide sufficient pasture for the animals and to maximize hunting opportunities for the soldiers.
The book also describes the climate of the Asian territory which made the Mongols thrive relatively unharmed from infectious diseases. In contrast, when they went to a humid territory, they would get infectious diseases, making them retreat to drier and colder climates where they thrived. Thought that was interesting.
Thank you Gaby, that is really interesting, I will look for this book next time I'll be at my local library
Yes, that's the sort of thing I've come across a hundred times or more reading archaeology and history. It's just amazing that health professionals have not paid the least attention to the historical evidence. What's even crazier is that historians and archaeologists themselves don't seem to pay much attention to their own evidence!
 
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