The Dark Gods by Anthony Roberts

Pashalis

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I'm over half-way through the book. It is a quite remarkable and important work IMO in which a lot of things the C's talked about in regard to the "Aliens" (the how, why and so forth) is echoed strongly. It is also interesting that this book was published in 1980, well before the C's shared their take on reality on earth and the universe and yet what the authors describe is pretty similar and in line with what the C's have said. They also make quite a number of interesting points that never really occurred to me before, but make perfect sense. It is also noteworthy that the authors strongly recommend and mention Keel's work throughout the book and the few others that have come to similar conclusions [such as; that the phenomena seems to be more inter-dimensional (and demonic/religious/paranormal) in nature than extraterrestrial for example].

The book sort of summarizes the many disguises the phenomena seems to have adopted throughout history, always seemingly adjusting itself to the time era and what the observer of the phenomena believes. I'm currently at the part the authors describe (in a way I've read nowhere else) how the whole NAZI movement, and most especially leading figures in it, like Hitler, seem to have been directly handled and directed by those forces. Fascinating and very much in line with the C's!

As of now I think the book deserves a high rank on our recommended book list for UFO/History stuff, together with the works of Keel. I've heard the authors have published other stuff too. When I'll have time, I'll look that up.
 

Pashalis

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I found this while perusing the Internet for information about the authors:

https://nocturnalrevelries.com/2019/07/21/dark-gods-anthony-roberts-and-geoff-gilbertson/ said:
There’s sparse information on the authors available online, and I had to dig around quite a bit for it to paint a cohesive picture. What I could find was fairly depressing. Both men are now dead. [....]
Quite disturbing:-O. It seems that lack of awareness and a helpful network made isolated people like Gilbertson vulnerable for attack...
Yes, quite sad. They also mentioned a handful of other researchers (that I've never heard before) in the past (that is before they published in 1980) who seem to have also died rather early/strangely while pursing a similar line of inquiry into the phenomena involved. I think it would be worthwhile to look up some of their works. It seems like the very few people out there who followed a similar line of inquiry were all (with few exceptions) taken out sooner or later in one way or the other. Not really surprising, but still rather sad. It seems like people who come as far as reaching this kind of inquiry are subjected to intense attack to silence their work. As mentioned, without a good network, it seems that this type of research can end rather early and sad.
 

Pashalis

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From the mentioned article:



This creepy image from the book shows the spot where Anthony Roberts would later die.
It couldn't get much creepier than that since Roberts and Gilbertson quite clearly and explicitly mention "Glastonbury Tor" in a number of places in the book as one of the most well known and haunted places on earth, in terms of many of the phenomena described in the book, including UFO's and the appearance of creepy "beings" and phenomena of all sorts and shapes.

More recent pictures from the place can be found here.
 

Joe

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Glastonbury Tor is likely some kind of lay-line nodal point or something. It might have been easy enough to co-opt some kind of earth energies to 'give' him a heart attack at that place, or maybe he just decided to check out himself.

Whatever the case, I've been there and there was nothing creepy about it, a pretty nice place actually, a lot of people visit it every year.
 

Zadius Sky

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I've heard the authors have published other stuff too. When I'll have time, I'll look that up.
Looks like Geoff Gilbertson didn't write any other books.

Anthony Roberts wrote three other books (which I initially found very pricey on Amazon):

Atlantean Traditions in Ancient Britain (1977)
Sowers of Thunder: Giants in Myth and History (1978)
Glastonbury: Ancient Avalon, New Jerusalem (1978) - Editor
 
Glastonbury Tor is likely some kind of lay-line nodal point or something. It might have been easy enough to co-opt some kind of earth energies to 'give' him a heart attack at that place, or maybe he just decided to check out himself.

Whatever the case, I've been there and there was nothing creepy about it, a pretty nice place actually, a lot of people visit it every year.
That seems likely. And any photographer knows how easy it is to make any place look sinister or welcoming in lightroom and photoshop. If you were to take a picture of Glastonbury Tor with a smiling group of tourists in a well lit area, it would suddenly look quite different from that overly dark picture from the book(to be honest, it looks like what you'd get from those shoebox pinhole cameras...)
 

Pashalis

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I'm over half-way through the book. It is a quite remarkable and important work IMO in which a lot of things the C's talked about in regard to the "Aliens" (the how, why and so forth) is echoed strongly. It is also interesting that this book was published in 1980, well before the C's shared their take on reality on earth and the universe and yet what the authors describe is pretty similar and in line with what the C's have said. They also make quite a number of interesting points that never really occurred to me before, but make perfect sense. It is also noteworthy that the authors strongly recommend and mention Keel's work throughout the book and the few others that have come to similar conclusions [such as; that the phenomena seems to be more inter-dimensional (and demonic/religious/paranormal) in nature than extraterrestrial for example].

The book sort of summarizes the many disguises the phenomena seems to have adopted throughout history, always seemingly adjusting itself to the time era and what the observer of the phenomena believes. I'm currently at the part the authors describe (in a way I've read nowhere else) how the whole NAZI movement, and most especially leading figures in it, like Hitler, seem to have been directly handled and directed by those forces. Fascinating and very much in line with the C's!

As of now I think the book deserves a high rank on our recommended book list for UFO/History stuff, together with the works of Keel. I've heard the authors have published other stuff too. When I'll have time, I'll look that up.
I've progressed further through the book now and given what was expressed in this post and the one below it, about the "Dark Gods" book and the sources they used, like Carr's book, for large sections of the second half of the book, in regards to "secret societies", I would be somewhat critical of their conclusions about this "conspiracy" in regards to "secret societies" in general, toward the end of the book.

It seems to me at this point, that while in general the idea they present there certainly plays and important role in some fashion, they overstate and rely on works like Carr way too much and making conclusions on the basis of works like this, that seem to be hard to verify, because they are essentially based on hearsay. It seems to me that in the point in time they wrote the book, works like Carr gained ground, in which it was first started to be claimed widely that there is or was a grand evil conspiracy perpetrated by the Illuminati and other societies like the Freemasons.

From what I understand so far, their take on it is tainted by the beginnings of this focus on "secret societies" guided by works like that from Carr. As with Carr, they also seem to have more or less come to a black and white conclusion based on insufficient homework both in terms of history and the topic of "secret societies".

What I'm basically trying to say here is that what they are trying to get at can be explained far better and concretely by Ponerology and forces that act especially well through Psychopaths and pathological people in general, in that context. We have seen by now where this focus on "secret societies" has led many people.

It simply isn't that easy nor black and white. Ponerology is a far better tool to explain a lot with no need to invoke grand evil "conspiracies" on the human level, in a black and white fashion, in which everyone participating in such societies is in one way or the other (either consciously or unconsciously) necessarily doing or participating in something bad. Even quite the contrary can be the case I reckon.
 
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