The Magnesium Miracle

Altair

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One week ago I started to take Magnesium L-Threonate (_http://shop.mercola.com/product/magnesium-l-threonate-120-per-bottle-90-day-supply,1192,420,0.htm) and the (almost immediate) effect on the mind clarity is really amazing. I take only 2 caps daily and it's probably the best nootropic I have ever tried.

Here is some additional info about Magnesium L-Threonate on Dr. Mercola's website: _http://products.mercola.com/magnesium-supplement/
 

Gaby

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Altair said:
One week ago I started to take Magnesium L-Threonate (_http://shop.mercola.com/product/magnesium-l-threonate-120-per-bottle-90-day-supply,1192,420,0.htm) and the (almost immediate) effect on the mind clarity is really amazing. I take only 2 caps daily and it's probably the best nootropic I have ever tried.

Here is some additional info about Magnesium L-Threonate on Dr. Mercola's website: _http://products.mercola.com/magnesium-supplement/
That is great! Coincidentally, this article was published recently on SOTT:

Magnesium's critical role in alleviating mood disorders
https://www.sott.net/article/318822-Magnesiums-critical-role-in-alleviating-mood-disorders

More clues here:

_http://nootriment.com/magnesium-l-threonate/

L-Threonate was found to dramatically increase the activity and plasticity of synapses. That means these connections between neurons were more inclined to grow and exhibit healthy, efficient communication behaviors. This was especially true in the hippocampus, home of all memory function in the human brain. Magnesium L-Threonate may achieve this effect partly by increasing cerebrospinal fluid in the brain.
 

Altair

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Thank you for the article, Gaby. Interestingly, this product by Dr. Mercola contains 144mg of Magtein and 2000 mg of Magnesium L-Threonate. Magtein appears to be a patented special form of L-Threonate:

MagteinTM is the only magnesium form to effectively increase the brain's magnesium levels.
Scientists have recently evaluated the ability of both bioavailable organic and inorganic magnesium forms to raise brain magnesium levels. Magnesium concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was evaluated following treatment with different magnesium compounds, including Magtein and along with the most bioavailable inorganic magnesium (magnesium-chloride), and the most bioavailable organic magnesium (magnesium-gluconate in milk). After 24 days, MagteinTM was the only magnesium compound shown to raise the cerebrospinal fluid magnesium concentration with statistical significance. (Figure 1)



Enhancement of synaptic density by MagteinTM
Previous studies indicate that synaptic connections in the hippocampus decline during aging, and this loss of synaptic connections correlates with impaired memory functions. To further characterize the cellular changes that underline Magtein-induced memory enhancement, researchers also examined the effect of MagteinTM treatment on the density of presynaptic boutons in aged rats. These results indicate that MagteinTM increased the synaptic density in the hippocampus region of the brain. (Figure 2)



MagteinTM Memory Research

Learning and memory are fundamental brain functions affected by dietary and environmental factors. Here, we show that increasing brain magnesium using a newly developed magnesium compound (Magnesium-L-threonate, MagteinTM) leads to the enhancement of learning abilities, working memory, and short- and long-term memory in rats.

MagteinTM improves short- and long-term memory in young and aged animals.
Animals taking different magnesium forms were evaluated for their short-term and long-term memory by a novel object recognition test. Only MagteinTM subjects showed a significant increase in both short- term and long-term memory. (Figure 3)



MagteinTM improves spatial working memory in young and aged animals

Researchers evaluated the spatial long-term memory of young and aged laboratory animals in a T-maze setting. Animals were timed to see how long it would take them to find the hidden platform based on a spatial strategy. In both age groups, MagteinTM intake led to a statistically higher spacial working memory. In addition, when MagteinTM intake was stopped at day 24 in the aged group, spacial working memory was reduced to the background level after two weeks. When MagteinTM intake was restated at day 60, the effect of MagteinTM on spacial working memory was observed again.


Source: _http://magtein.com/magtein-science.html

Not sure which one does the magic. Perhaps a combination of them?
 

Keit

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Altair said:
Thank you for the article, Gaby. Interestingly, this product by Dr. Mercola contains 144mg of Magtein and 2000 mg of Magnesium L-Threonate. Magtein appears to be a patented special form of L-Threonate:
Just a note that on iherb you can see the same form of magnesium by other companies, and they have the same amount and combination as the product by Dr. Mercola. It's true that his product has good reviews, but it is also a bit pricey!

Also, thank you for the recommendation, Altair! :flowers: I am out of magnesium and right before the exams, so ordered it today. Though decided to go with the cheaper version. Also because if the package costs more than 22 euros, it goes though customs, and they take duties and taxes, not to mention 18 euros for passing it through customs.
 

anartist

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FOTCM Member
Mildain said:
SummerLite said:
I'm reporting on a possible adverse reaction from taking "Natural Calm",ionic magnesium citrate powder from Natural Vitality. I switched to this brand recently and have only taken it twice. On both occasions taken just before bed, I wake in the middle of the night and have to sit up very fast to keep myself from vomiting. The first dose was the recommended one on the container of 2 tsp, 325 mg, dissolved in water and last night I upped this to 3 tsps. to work with the iodine protocol better.

Well, I'm taking it back to the store today for another type. I had been using TraceMinerals, liquid Magnesium citrate for some time with the good relaxing affects before bed for more then 6 months. Thought I'd try something different but this one isn't the best choice for me apparently.

Does anyone have insight on what this could be? thanks
I use this brand exactly. I get it from a local health store (Fiddleheads). Link for info : http://fiddleheadshealth.com/2015/10/15/stress-wreaks-havoc-on-life/

I also use the flavored version. Ive been taking it for about a year and a half, and have no problems unless I take more than 5000mg-6000mg a day - severe problems start at 10g (I normally have 3000-4000mg). Ive never had it wake me up in the middle of the night or give me nausea of any kind.

Just thought i'd put in my two cents here.
I also use CALM, an orange flavoured version, and take two scoops (approx 5 gr) in water before bed. No bad affects from it that I have noticed. perhaps it is the additives which may cause a problem for you? (citric acid, organic natural orange flavour, organic stevia)

Another source of magnesium is something I picked up from the afibbers.org site (my dad has some afib problems)

They claim 50% absorption, and you get 125 mg Mag/litre using their measurements, but I put 300ml of the magnesium concentrate into 2 litres of water so I have almost 250 mg Mag/litre water. This is a very inexpensive form of magnesium! I also sometimes use club soda with potassium bicarbonate and potassium citrate, another brand has sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate. I don't have a problem with either potassium or sodium, especially in bicarbonate form (as per Dr Sircus).

site http://afibbers.org/resources/index.htm
document http://afibbers.org/resources/Wallerwater.pdf
The text from the document is pasted below

Recipe for Magnesium/Bicarbonate Water

Natural mineral waters with high concentrations of magnesium and bicarbonate ions have long
been prized for their health promoting qualities. The famous Apollinaris water contains 104 mg/L
of magnesium, but unfortunately is also fairly high in sodium and calcium. Mendocino water
contains 130 mg/L of magnesium, but again has fairly high calcium and sodium levels. A more
ideal water is Noah’s spring water bottled from the Adobe Springs in California. Noah’s California
Spring Water contains 110 mg/L of magnesium, but only 3 mg/L of calcium and 5 mg/L of
sodium. It also contains 529 mg/L of bicarbonate ions and has a pH of 8.3.

Magnesium-rich mineral waters are easily absorbed and have many health benefits due not only
to their magnesium content, but also because of their content of bicarbonate ions that help
neutralize the carbonic acid formed in the body during metabolic processes. Several studies
have shown that an increased intake of bicarbonate may help prevent muscle wasting and bone
loss[1-3].
A manufactured magnesium/bicarbonate water, “Unique Water”, has recently been developed in
Australia. It contains 120 mg of magnesium and 650 mg of bicarbonate per liter and has a pH of
8.3.
Erling Waller, a former afibber, and Jackie Burgess, both frequent contributors to the Bulletin
Board, collaborated to develop a recipe for homemade magnesium/bicarbonate water that, in its
composition, is very close to both Noah’s California Spring Water and Unique Water. The recipe
is based on the reaction of magnesium hydroxide (in milk of magnesia) with plain carbonated
water according to the formula Mg(OH) 2 + 2CO 2 ---> Mg(HCO 3 ) 2 .

Plain Milk of Magnesia (MoM) should be used in the recipe. The “active” ingredient should only
be magnesium hydroxide
[Mg (OH) 2 ], 400 mg per teaspoon (5 ml), and the “inactive” ingredient
should only be purified water. 41.7% by weight of magnesium hydroxide is magnesium (Mg), so 5
ml of MoM has 167 mg of Mg, and 1 tablespoon has 500 mg of Mg (1 tablespoon = 15 ml).
To prepare the water follow these steps: [ed:I bolded the ingredients to make sure any replacement you find for
"philips milk of magnesia" contain the same ingredients]

1. Chill completely to refrigerator temperature a 1-liter bottle of fully carbonated water.
Carbonated waters such as Canada Dry Seltzer, which consist of only water and carbon
dioxide (CO 2 ), are suitable. Club sodas such as Schweppes Club Soda are also suitable;
they are carbonated water with a small amount of added sodium. [ed. or added potassium]

2. Shake well the bottle of MoM, then measure out as accurately as possible 3 tablespoons
(45 ml) and have it ready
Shake well the bottle of MoM, then measure out as accurately as possible 3 tablespoons
(45 ml) and have it ready. The plastic measuring cup that comes with the MoM is
accurate and ideal for the purpose.

3. Remove the bottle of carbonated water from the refrigerator without agitating it. Open it
slowly and carefully to minimize the loss of CO 2 . As soon as the initial fizzing settles
down, slowly add the pre-measured MoM. Promptly replace the cap on the water bottle
and shake it vigorously for 30 seconds or so, making the liquid cloudy. After ½ hour or so
the liquid will have cleared, and any un-dissolved magnesium hydroxide will have settled
to the bottom of the bottle. Again shake the bottle vigorously for 30 seconds or so,
making the liquid cloudy again. When the liquid again clears all of the magnesium
hydroxide in the MoM should have reacted with all of the CO 2 to become dissolved
(ionized) magnesium and bicarbonate. However, if a small amount of un-dissolved
magnesium hydroxide still remains in the bottom of the bottle as a sediment it may be
ignored. This 1 liter of concentrated magnesium bicarbonate water will have
approximately 1500 mg of magnesium and approximately 7500 mg of bicarbonate. It
should be kept in the refrigerator. You may note that the sides of the bottle “cave in”
when the liquid clears. This is a sign that the reaction is complete.

4. To make 4 liters of magnesium bicarbonate drinking water with approximately 125 mg of
magnesium and approximately 625 mg of bicarbonate per liter and a pH of
approximately 8+ measure and transfer 1/3 liter of the concentrate (333 ml) into a 4-liter
container. Fill the container with 3 2/3 liters of plain or purified water, as desired.
Magnesium dissolved in water (ionized) is considerably more bioavailable than is magnesium in
solid tablets or capsules. About 50% of the magnesium contained in magnesium/bicarbonate
water is absorbed[4,5]
. This is 12 times better than the absorption rate for magnesium oxide. So
drinking 1 liter of magnesium/bicarbonate water per day would correspond to taking five 500 mg
magnesium oxide tablets daily.
The alkaline magnesium/bicarbonate water should be consumed throughout the day. It can be
consumed with a meal, but not in such quantities that it results in dilution of stomach acid.
Anyone not in the habit of drinking water should begin by consuming small daily amounts, and
should take at least a month to reach a consumption of 1 to 2 liters per day.
A survey of afibbers who have tried the magnesium/bicarbonate water concluded that 7 out of 12
found it beneficial. The effect on episode frequency was inconsistent with four participants
experiencing fewer episodes, six experiencing more episodes and two observing no change.
Similarly with episode duration. Five participants experienced a shortening, five a lengthening
and two saw no change in episode duration. It would seem that that the effect of the water on
episode severity is highly variable and that each individual afibber need to determine whether it
works for him or her through individual experimentation.
A majority (73%) of trial participants reported that the intensity (forcefulness of palpitations) of
their episodes was less after starting on the magnesium/bicarbonate water. The remaining 27%
reported no change. This finding suggests that magnesium or bicarbonate somehow helps make
the palpitations less noticeable. It is worth noting that the two respondents who had not noticed
any change in intensity had quite a low daily magnesium intake (114 mg and 250 mg/day
respectively). It is possible that magnesium may reduce episode intensity through its action as a
natural calcium channel blocker[6,7,8]. This action would reduce heart rate and might result in a
feeling of lower intensity.
Eight out of 14 respondents reported other benefits from consuming the water such as a higher
daily fluid intake, less heartburn, disappearance of night time leg cramps and fewer ectopic
(premature) beats. Only 4 out of 12 reported side effects with loose stools being experienced by
3 participants who were drinking the water with a higher than recommended magnesium
concentration.
Thus it would seem that, while the magnesium/bicarbonate water is beneficial for some afibbers,
especially in regard to episode intensity, there are afibbers who do not experience benefits from
consuming it. In other words, like pharmaceutical drugs and supplements, the water may not be
an overall panacea, but may be beneficial to some afibbers.
The magnesium/bicarbonate water made according to the recipe has a pH of about 8.5. Normal
tap water has a pH around 7. The pH of blood is very tightly controlled between 7.38 and 7.44.
Both higher and lower pH values in the blood (alkalemia and academia) can result in arrhythmias.
It is also known that metabolic alkalosis can result in hypokalemia (potassium deficiency) which
in turn, can cause atrial fibrillation. So all in all, drinking water with a pH of 8.5 may not be
beneficial to all. Whether or not it is could well depend on the individual’s diet and metabolism.
I have personally found the magnesium/bicarbonate water more agreeable if I neutralize it to a
pH of about 7.2. I do this by adding 10-11 drops of a concentrated citric acid solution to 1 liter of
the “ready-to-drink” magnesium/bicarbonate water (NOT to the concentrate). I make the citric
acid solution by dissolving 4 teaspoons (20 gram) of anhydrous citric acid (available from a
pharmacy) in 100 ml of ordinary (preferably filtered or distilled) water. A similar, but less precise
result may be obtained by squeezing half a lemon into the water before drinking it
Please also note that patients with kidney failure should not drink this water or consume any
other kind of magnesium supplements without the express agreement of their physician.

Legal Disclaimer
Please note that the maker and consumer of this water assume full responsibility for
understanding and complying with the above instructions and recommendations. The
information and instructions do not constitute a recommendation to consume this water, and
no claims of health benefits from consuming this water are made.
For more detailed information on manufactured magnesium/bicarbonate water please visit the
“Unique Water” web site at http://www.nonpharmaceutical.com.

References
1. Frassetto, L., et al. Potassium bicarbonate reduces urinary nitrogen excretion in postmenopausal
women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 82, No. 1, 1997, pp. 254-59
2. Frassetto, Lynda A., et al. Estimation of net endogenous noncarbonic acid production in human
from diet potassium and protein contents. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 68, 1998,
pp. 567-83
3. Sebastian, A., et al. Improved mineral balance and skeletal metabolism in postmenopausal
women treated with potassium bicarbonate. New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 330, June 23,
1994, pp. 1776-81
4. Sabatier, M., et al. Meal effect on magnesium bioavailability from mineral water in healthy women.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 75, January 2002, pp. 65-71
5. Verhas, M., et al. Magnesium bioavailability from mineral water: a study in adult men. European
Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 56, May 2002, pp. 442-47

6. www.barttersite.com/magnesium.htm
7. Yamaoka, K, et al. Temperature-sensitive intracellular Mg2+ block of L-type Ca2+ channels in
cardiac myocytes. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, Vol. 282, No. 3, March 2002, pp. H1092-101
8. Gourgoulianis, Kl, et al. Magnesium dynamics and relation to left ventricular function in acute
myocardial infarction. Japn Circ J, Vol. 64, No. 5, May 2000, pp. 377-81
THE AFIB REPORT is published 10 times a year by:
Hans R. Larsen MSc ChE, 1320 Point Street, Victoria, BC, Canada, V8S 1A5
E-mail: editor@afibbers.org World Wide Web: http://www.afibbers.org
Copyright 2009 by Hans R. Larsen

THE AFIB REPORT does not provide medical advice. Do not attempt self-diagnosis or self-medication
based on our reports. Please consult your healthcare provider if you are interested in following up on
the information presented.
 

Sentenza

Jedi
I've done blood analyses few days ago, and everything is okay but my intracellular magnesium status : 36 mg/l (normal range : 40,1 - 64,4 mg/l).
It appears to be very low and confirm some issues I have right now, especially with stress and energy levels.
I will try to correct it with magnesium chloride transdermally (as Dr Sircus recommands), and maybe an oral form (chloride or over ?)
Never eard avec the threonate form... I will investigate....

PS : vitamin D levels were a bit low too : 25 ng/ml (desired rate : between 30 and 60 ng/ml). Guess I have to try a supplementation here....
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Sentenza said:
I've done blood analyses few days ago, and everything is okay but my intracellular magnesium status : 36 mg/l (normal range : 40,1 - 64,4 mg/l).
It appears to be very low and confirm some issues I have right now, especially with stress and energy levels.
I will try to correct it with magnesium chloride transdermally (as Dr Sircus recommands), and maybe an oral form (chloride or over ?)
Never eard avec the threonate form... I will investigate....

PS : vitamin D levels were a bit low too : 25 ng/ml (desired rate : between 30 and 60 ng/ml). Guess I have to try a supplementation here....
Transdermal magnesium chloride will definitely help bring up your magnesium levels.

I will try to correct it with magnesium chloride transdermally (as Dr Sircus recommands), and maybe an oral form (chloride or over ?)
I am not sure what you mean when you say "chloride or over?" Would you clarify your question?
 

Sentenza

Jedi
Menrva said:
I am not sure what you mean when you say "chloride or over?" Would you clarify your question?
Sorry, I would say "magnesium chloride or other form of magnesium" for oral consumption (like gluconate, glycerophosphate, threonate and so on...)

I'll do analysis in few months to see the results.
 

Adaryn

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FOTCM Member
Sentenza said:
Sorry, I would say "magnesium chloride or other form of magnesium" for oral consumption (like gluconate, glycerophosphate, threonate and so on...)

I'll do analysis in few months to see the results.
Mag. glycinate, citrate or malate would be fine (to take away from meals, preferably at bedtime).

Carolyn Dean says in The Magnesium Miracle:

Weight for weight and dollar for dollar, magnesium citrate may be the best buy for general use. It's probably the mostly widely used magnesium supplement because it's inexpensive, easily absorbed and only has a mild laxative effect. The best form is magnesium citrate powder mixed in water that can be taken every day
 

Oxajil

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Carolyn Dean sent a newsletter today where she links to the following article:

Magnesium may stabilize glaucoma

Following up on previous studies which had found a reduced magnesium content in aqueous humor, anterior sclera and tear fluid of patients with various stages of glaucoma (POAG), a group of researchers in Moscow conducted a study to determine whether a magnesium-containing supplement might have a beneficial effect on IOP, visual fields and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

In the study, 22 POAG patients (mean age 61.1 ±2.5 years; r: 42 to 72) received hypotensive therapy supplemented by Magnerot (Wörwag Pharma, Germany) daily for six weeks: two tablespoons three times a day for one week, then one or two tablespoons two to three times a day for five more weeks. As a control, 16 POAG patients (63.7 ±2.7 years) received hypotensive therapy without Magnerot. The group assessed the optic nerve before treatment and at one, two, three and five months post-treatment. In addition to perimetry and retinal tomography, the ORA (Reichert) was used to measure corneal-compensated IOPcc, IOP equivalent to Goldmann (IOPG) and corneal hysteresis.

The treatment group showed almost twice as many improved visual field results as the control group. IOPG dropped by 3.3 ±0.4 mmHg after adding the magnesium supplement; IOPcc dropped by 4.1 ±0.3 mmHg (both p<0.05). Perimetry showed a significant increase in total functional visual field (from 426.5 ±7.8 to 452.5 ±8.8 degrees, p<0.05), mainly in patients with moderate glaucoma, and analysis of the MD index showed reduction in the total depression of sensitivity from an average of -5.8 dB to -3.9 dB (p>0.5). Furthermore, the average thickness of the RNFL tended to grow in patients in the early stages of glaucoma (from 0.25 ±0.02 mm to 0.27 ±0.01 mm) and moderate stage (0.19 ±0.03 mm to 0.21 ±0.02 mm) following treatment.

The authors believe these results suggest that a magnesium-containing supplement may have a stabilizing effect on the course of glaucoma, and recommend further study.

Source: Review of Ophthalmology Online
article by Peter A. Netland, MD, PhD, and Kuldev Singh, MD, MPH, Section Editors
5/5/2013
link: http://www.revophth.com/content/c/40629

Magnesium (Mg2+) is known to play a major role in cellular metabolism (Lin et al., 2002) and is critical for nervous system functioning (Paymaster, 1976; Furukawa et al., 2009). Aberrations in Mg2+ homeostasis leads to biochemical dysregulation and may contribute to psychological and neurological disorders such as depression (Whittle et al., 2011; Murck, 2002; Rasmussen et al., 1989; Singewald et al., 2011), Parkinson’s Disease (Shindo et al., 2011) and glaucoma (Crish et al., 2012). Increases in brain Mg2+ enhanced short-term synaptic facilitation and long-term potentiation as well as spatial memory (Slutsky et al., 2010). A newly developed compound, Magnesium-L-threonate (MgT; brand name Magtein™) has been shown to significantly enhance bioavailability and produce 7–15% increases in rat CSF Mg2+ while other magnesium compounds tested failed to significantly elevate Mg2+ in CSF when compared to controls (Slutsky et al., 2010).

link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3668337/

Here are some key facts about magnesium:

50 million Americans are magnesium deficient
Magnesium deficiency may play important role in cognitive impairment
Magnesium threonate has dramatic effects in preventing synapse loss and reversing memory decline in mice with Alzheimer's disease
Magtein (magnesium threonate) treatment benefits performance on working, spatial and recognition memory tasks
Magnesium Is the fourth most abundant mineral in your body
Exists in over 300 different bodily enzymes
Magnesium is found primarily in your bones (50% of total body magnesium)
Magnesium plays a role in your body’s detoxification processes
Magnesium aids your energy metabolism and protein synthesis
Helps guide a large number of physiological functions
Magnesium is required for synthesis of glutathione (the “master antioxidant”)
She also included:

The following article in the IOVS Journal, Presence of an Established Calcification Marker in Trabecular Meshwork Tissue of Glaucoma Donors confirms my theory about calcification. The authors concluded that, “The increased activity of the calcification marker, ALP, in glaucomatous trabecular meshworks might be indicative of an undergoing mineralization process during development of the disease.” That means that calcium is likely blocking the trabecular meshwork, just like it blocks arteries and builds up in soft tissue throughout the body. New aqueous humor is produced and older fluid is supposed to be released, but if the meshwork is calcified, and the magnesium in the aqueous humor is deficient and won’t dissolve the calcium, the pressure continues to build up in the eye.

The obvious solution is to saturate your body with ReMag to dissolve this calcification and optimize all the components of the aqueous fluid with all the formulas in Total Body ReSet.
So, magnesium supplementation could also help with glaucoma. FWIW.
 

Lilou

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Thanks for posting this, Oxajil. It makes total sense about the calcification of the trabecular meshwork slowing down drainage of aqueous fluid! I often recommend Magnesium for my patients, but will make a point to do so for those with higher IOPs and glaucoma. Lately, I've seen A LOT of younger people with pressures well into the 20's (normal is between 12 - 18 mmHg, for an average corneal thickness).
 

Gaby

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FOTCM Member
Lilou said:
Thanks for posting this, Oxajil. It makes total sense about the calcification of the trabecular meshwork slowing down drainage of aqueous fluid! I often recommend Magnesium for my patients, but will make a point to do so for those with higher IOPs and glaucoma. Lately, I've seen A LOT of younger people with pressures well into the 20's (normal is between 12 - 18 mmHg, for an average corneal thickness).
Good to keep in mind. I hope magnesium gets more popular among the population. It is unnerving to see young people with problems they shouldn't have.
 

A Jay

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've been going to a Chiropractor/Applied Kinesiologist for a few weeks and he's had me taking a magnesium chelate in the morning and at night before bed. What a difference! I'm more emotionally stable, have had my anxiety symptoms lessen dramatically, I no longer feel anxious when I smoke, and my muscle 'ratcheting' has improved as well. He's got me taking some other things to help with the anxiety and cortisol disregulation, but the magnesium has by far done the most to improve my sense of well-being.

Quite an improvement after just a few weeks of supplementation. Talk about a miracle! :thup:
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
onemen said:
Does anyone know if this Brand is legit? "Vitamins because your worth it"
_http://www.ebay.com/itm/Magnesium-Citrate-833-mg-200-Capsules-High-Potency-Fresh-Expires-2021-USA-FDA-/201396417131?hash=item2ee429726b:g:DGAAAOSwAKxWXed~ How can they get precisely 833mg also so cheap..
833mg of magnesium citrate is likely to cause bowel intolerance - soft stools and/or diarrhea - in people who are deficient, even if it's in two capsules. That means the magnesium isn't absorbed by the body and would be a waste of money - no pun intended. :) The fact that they don't know that and their label is misspelled ('your' should be 'you're') is a bit fishy - to me at least.

If you are looking for inexpensive magnesium citrate or another form of magnesium, Swanson Vitamins carries quite a few low-priced, reputable brands and they do ship internationally.

https://www.swansonvitamins.com/q?kw=magnesium+citrate
 
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