A tiny tree

zak

Jedi Council Member
In these times of immediacy, to plant consciously a tiny tree, and take care of him,
see him growing months after months, years after years, living the differents saisons with him.
I think is one of the most good thing that we can make for us and the futur generation.
A tree is a vertical alchemist transforming among others carbon dioxide into oxygen, even dry and dead in the athanor of our house
keeping us company and warm.
There are so much things to learn about the trees, so don't hesitate to touch one !
 

Windmill knight

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Nice thoughts zak. I'm curious, what's your favourite tree? I love oaks and willows.

One thing I will say about planting a tree: It is a statement of faith in the future, in spite of everything we see in the present. Maybe we should do it if only for that reason.
 

Lilou

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I just love collecting volunteer trees into pots and watching them grow. I used to get small, tiny, Fir Trees in my rock garden. Unfortunately I haven't found any for the last 2 years. My son started 30 date palms from the pits he recovered after eating dates, and they are magnificent. About a foot tall after a little over a year.

I always thought this could make an excellent side business with so little effort. And could be good for barter if SHTF, too.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
A tree is a kind of being of the past, present and futur !

I'm not so difficult in matter of trees, i feel fine and like them all, like the "sharp" Auracaria auracana,
the thorn Robinia pseudoacacia, or the hybride of the west and the east Platanus xhispanica, slippery with one drop of rain...

Oaks and willows, there are greats, it's a good balance, ones strongs and royals, others supples and protectors.

To answer you Windmill knight, i don't have a favorite one, a Sequoiadendron giganteum can be my favorite one,
because i shared my enthusiasm and joy to touch him and admire him with people that i loved.

My son started 30 date palms from the pits he recovered after eating dates, and they are magnificent. About a foot tall after a little over a year. :)

I always thought this could make an excellent side business with so little effort. And could be good for barter if SHTF, too. :)
Good luck to you Lilou !
 

davey72

The Living Force
I have always liked growing what is commonly referred to as the Manitoba Maple.They are very hard and grow very fast.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
What's a nice name in english "Manitoba maple" :)
, in french it's calling "érable negundo" of the latin Acer negundo,
his leaves are similar to the ash,at the difference of others maples where the leaves are very typical.
Manitoba maple grows very fast, yes, that's why his roots seat are very sensitive to the big wind.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
Some bees gathering on newly blooming flowers of Prunus padus, bird cherry, in french cerisier à grappes and also bois puant/stinky wood.
The bark is diuretic, sudorific, stomachic and febrifuge, the flowers and leaves are antispasmodic.
I think it can be funny for me to post here some stuffs like this.
 

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Lys

Padawan Learner
zak said:
Some bees gathering on newly blooming flowers of Prunus padus, bird cherry, in french cerisier à grappes and also bois puant/stinky wood.
The bark is diuretic, sudorific, stomachic and febrifuge, the flowers and leaves are antispasmodic.
I think it can be funny for me to post here some stuffs like this.
Nice pics! I agree with you. I find it really interesting, I use essential oils quite often but I am not enough informed in pure botanic and plants properties.
I am learning though and I think this is an interesting way of getting closer to the nature with an essential knowledge.
Taking care of trees and plants with respect in exchange of what they can provide to us.
Do you use the Prunus padus for his properties? Have you a favourite method?

[quote author=Windmill knight]One thing I will say about planting a tree: It is a statement of faith in the future, in spite of everything we see in the present. Maybe we should do it if only for that reason.[/quote]

You are right! I hadn't seen planting a tree this way but in fact that seems obvious now. It feels good :)
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
Hello Lys, no i don't use it and i didn't really have the opportunity to experience its properties on myself.
It's more by curiosity, and a habit that i have with trees and plants.
And it's giving an other view on differents weeds of the garden knowing its medecinal properties, than "bad grasses" to snatch absolutly.
As you said "this is an interesting way of getting closer to the nature with an essential knowledge", and in some way doing this we can get closer to our own nature.
 

Lys

Padawan Learner
True! Having a few experiences in volunteering in farms made me discover quite a lot about myself.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
Today let's taking a closer look to Salix fragilis.
From celtic sal=near/close, lis=water.
From latin fragilis= fragile (twigs easily breaking near the stem).
The bark of crack willow is anti-rheumatic and febrifuge, containing salicin and salicylic acid components of aspirin.
 

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JGeropoulas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've been an avid gardener since I discovered the magic of plants when I was 12 years old, but I've never planted a tree. But planting one as a symbol of hope in the future is inspiring. Here's a picture of the most-beloved road in my town thanks to someone's hope in the future 100 years ago.

...and a life-long favorite poem:

Trees
by Joyce Kilmer

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the sweet earth’s flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
 
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