Body by Science / HIIT Experiment

Alana

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For those of you who don't want to use a smartphone app, I've attached my HIIT Tracker Excel spreadsheet. Just delete my numbers on Sheet 1 and replace them with your own. I left my numbers so you can see what the graphs look like (Sheets 2 and 3). Ooo! Aaah! Also, it gives an idea of the gains you can make fairly quickly. So, it's clearly working out better (HA!) for me than any other type of workout I've ever done - esp. considering it's only 15 minutes a week!
I've been using that spreadsheet for 2 months and only now I saw the graphs :-[ But thank you, they are awesome! It also seems that I reached a plateau, gotta up my game.



BTW, I keep this quote by Peterson in mind when I do the workouts, for motivation:
“The purpose of life is finding the largest burden that you can bear and bearing it.”
 

genero81

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I did my second workout this morning. I lowered the weights I was using a little thinking I could really work the muscles. That might be true but it was taking a little too long to get to failure. I think I had it right the first time. I'm still waiting for the book. I don't think it's even been shipped yet. Note to self; don't buy any more used books from Amazon. :-/
 
hey! do not feel bad, that by general consensus the typical, inefficient and unnatural gymnastic training model is boring and those who support it is more than anything because they have a higher goal like losing weight or ego for a body promoted by magazines and culture ... really do not take away merits for doing this training that is very hard and totally collapses the nervous system which has a lot to do with adaptations of force ... as they progress it is normal to feel less frustrated and more open to exercise, it is entertaining to see how strength is increased to levels you did not think possible and also observe increases in functionality ... this really is what will surely give you the missing motivation ... although I do not predict that will be pure glory because as those who started with the method have realized, which in itself is very devastating.
 

Thebull

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2 month’s ago I joined the gym after a long break and I have been working hard. When I first read this I must say I was very sceptical but after reading more on the subject less so though I haven’t bought the book yet.

Just to clarify on each exercise you need your max weight and the lift to take min 30 secs and not exceeding 90 secs. If you don’t burn out in that time just increase the weight?

Is the pull down what I would call a machine lat pull down with a wide bar pulling down above the head? Also the overhead press a machine shoulder press?

You train every 7 day’s, is this so your muscles’s recover fully from the fatigue? I’m worried as been a tight Yorkshire man I need to get my money’s worth from my gym monthly membership fee :scared:.
 

Laura

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2 month’s ago I joined the gym after a long break and I have been working hard. When I first read this I must say I was very sceptical but after reading more on the subject less so though I haven’t bought the book yet.

Just to clarify on each exercise you need your max weight and the lift to take min 30 secs and not exceeding 90 secs. If you don’t burn out in that time just increase the weight?
Pretty much. You want to try to burn out to failure in about a minute.

Is the pull down what I would call a machine lat pull down with a wide bar pulling down above the head? Also the overhead press a machine shoulder press?
The lat pulldown, yes. The overhead press is just picking up a bar with weights on it and pushing it up into the air with your arms, not shoulders.

You train every 7 day’s, is this so your muscles’s recover fully from the fatigue? I’m worried as been a tight Yorkshire man I need to get my money’s worth from my gym monthly membership fee :scared:.
Yes, about every 7 days. Sometimes it is better to wait a little longer, like 10 days to 14.

Why don't you talk to your gym people about just coming once a week and if they can make a special rate for that?
 

luc

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Also, no matter what your ultimate personal goal is, keep in mind that the book says it will most likely take 2 years to reach maximum genetic muscular potential (which means Everything Else Potential, as well).
As I understood it from the book, you typically reach your genetic potential in about 2 years indeed - meaning by then, you become the super(wo)man you are meant to be :-D

But the authors also say that people usually report great results very quickly. It certainly was like that for me - after just 2 sessions, I already noticed a big difference. This then starts accelerating once you learn how to exhaust you muscles even better, optimize weights and technique and so on. So yeah, I'd say expect quick results, but you also need to persist - no free lunch!

Why don't you talk to your gym people about just coming once a week and if they can make a special rate for that?
And if that doesn't work out, who cares if you get great results from your training? I can understand that the gym's prices seem unfair if you just go there once a week for half an hour, but at the end of the day, the results count.

I was never much of an exerciser, but I think there are people who do it as a hobby, who enjoy it, and some are even addicted to exercising. For those it may be hard to scale back to once a week - I guess they are usually the ones having "training anxiety". But again, if you are in it for the results, this shouldn't be a concern IMO.
 

Thebull

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Thanks for the responses. My comments about getting my money’s worth we’re tongue in cheek. :-) It is about the results and what's best for the body imo. I do consider training as a hobby though as this helps me to train reguarly as it’s something I can enjoy.

It is ironic though as I joined the gym on a 12 month contract to get a lower price £35 per month. If I had have learned about this program before I would have asked the owner to pay as I go although they don’t really offer that type of membership.

Not to worry they have the machines and I can try the program out. My brain is screaming to me though how can you improve strength and health by training for 15 minutes a week. :huh: That’s why I’m keen to give it a try.

Scottie thanks for the spreadsheet it’s good to keep a record of what you do osit.
 

Rabelais

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While undergoing the Neuroptima sessions I was urged to start the BBS program to try to undo the frailty that three years of bizarre neurological conditions had left me with. I was already experiencing benefits from the neuro sessions, but my physical weakness was frustrating. I didn't feel ready to spend my remaining years in the old rocking chair withering away. After only two weeks of the BBS sessions there are noticeable improvements in vitality and stamina.

Edit: My body no longer demands the daily mid-day naps.
 

Divide by Zero

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This is actually one of the primary reasons to do this workout. It's short, it's hard core, it's gentle on the joints and other connective tissues because you're moving weight very slowly (F=ma), and so far it seems very effective for improving overall "structural rigidity and durability".

And if you get more toned muscles as a result, well, bonus!

Also, no matter what your ultimate personal goal is, keep in mind that the book says it will most likely take 2 years to reach maximum genetic muscular potential (which means Everything Else Potential, as well).

The #1 and #2 reasons people stop working out are:

1. But I don't wanna!
2. I'm not seeing the results promised!

So, you have to stick with it for at LEAST 6 months - and up to 2 years. I think he actually says some people won't notice big changes until after 6 months. But so far, we're all noticing some dramatic improvements in various areas even though no one looks like He-Man. :shock:
I occasionally work out in a similar way, not using a lot of weight but moving very slowly until burnout. I read it in a book called "The Power of 10" years ago ( https://www.amazon.com/Power-Once-W...=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=006000889X )
Not sure if they explain the same dynamic as this book, but it does sound very similar!

Anyway, this routine never made me gain weight or look big. But it really does wonders with strength! Just the other week my co worker was surprised that I could lift a heavy device that he had trouble with. He works out regularly at a gym and asked me what exercises I do. When I mentioned the slow pushups, chin ups, 25 lb weight curls + overhead lifts, he was perplexed because of the low weight/using bodyweight.

What makes these exercises so good is that we're evenly using up the various muscle fibers instead of just burning out a specific set!
 

Turgon

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I'm still waiting for the book to arrive and start reading it so I can understand the science of it in more detail, but Arwenn brought to our attention a video with a fellow doing the big 5 workout adapted to the home using your own bodyweight, except for a chin-up bar (which costs $30-40) and a bar or broom, and I tried it out the other day after waiting a little over a week to workout, and I'm impressed! Almost all my major muscle groups are still feeling the burn after two days, but I never thought my legs would feel this kind of burn after doing ONE set of bodyweight squats to total failure. He goes 10 seconds for a full rep (up and down) but I chose to increase that to 12-14 seconds. Even Doug McGuff posted on the video and recommends it. I didn't see it posted on the thread here, unless I missed it, so here it is.

 

pete02

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Hi everyone, this sounds like something I'd definitely like to get into as well. I've made it thru a couple of chapters in the book and have been following all your posts which has helped me probably more. Thanks for that! I'm looking into home gyms and I found one that I think will work but I thought a second opinion from you all who have been doing this couldn't hurt.

This is the one I'm interested in... Weider 2980X Home Gym

Starts at a decent price but then with shipping and tax ends up just around $420. Do you think it will cover the exercises needed for this program?
 
i came across body by science some time ago. and have also started too re-implement the super slow repetitions on a tuesday morning for the week. I can attest to the feeling of deep fatigue in the muscles and throughout the following days. I enjoy it thought, especially working through the intense discomfort for the last reps. @Turgon, thanks for sharing the video. I might include some super slow pushups as well and scale my pulls ups similar to how he does it in the video.
 

Prodigal Son

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Irrespective of the new tissue growth that may have happened as a result of doing a total of 5 sessions, of slow, repetition lifts for just a total of 5 weeks, what I can see, is, tangible evidence of increased lifting capacity as well as some increased muscle tone.

For weights to burnout/to total failure in approx 1 min:
Bent over barbell row - from a total of 16kg to 40kg (an increase of 250%)
Chest press - 20kg to 30kg (150%)
Pull down - 40kg to 50kg (125%)
Overhead press - 14kg - 24kg (171%)
Leg press - 70kg to 150kg (214%)

Whilst the weights in themselves are less than impressive (well for experienced work out guys, that is, which I am not), it is not a bad increase in lifting capacity for just 15mins of lifting exercise once a week for a total of 5 weeks.
 

Mark

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For those of you who don't want to use a smartphone app, I've attached my HIIT Tracker Excel spreadsheet.
The time under load app I'm using on Android is painfully slow and I haven't found a better one suited for the HIIT/Body by Science routine. So yesterday I wrote my own mobile app, it's only a few hundred lines of code written entirely in Javascript and HTML, and it runs super fast. It's also configurable: you can choose any of 9 exercises (including the 5 from the Body by Science book), adjust the pin level or weight for each one, use a timer, and track progress in a table of stats and a chart for each exercise. The app doesn't need any permissions to run since it doesn't access anything on the mobile device. All it does is present a user interface and store progress data.

I'll see if I can get it into the Android Play store for easy access and if not I'll put the APK file (Android package) somewhere online for download and post a link in this thread.
 
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