Buckwheat Sourdough Starters?

broken.english

Jedi
FOTCM Member
broken.english,

Your recipe hasn't disappeared, it is just merged. Since a sourdough culture is really the defining part of making any sourdough recipe, wouldn't it be better suited to put the sourdough recipes along with any starter instructions and other health-related information on sourdough in a single single thread?
Ok, Ryan, let's try. I will then add my starter recipe below.
 

broken.english

Jedi
FOTCM Member
Buckwheat sourdough starter

A buckwheat sourdough starter can easily be made from scratch as follows:

Ingredients:

50 gr freshly ground buckwheat
50 ml warm water
optional: some home made kombucha as stabilizer

Mix ingredients and put it in a glass container with lid in order to avoid contamination. Store it in a warm place. The temperature should be 25-30°C.

Feed it twice a day with a tbsp buckwheat flour and an equal amount of water. Precision is not needed.

The whole procedure may take 4--5 days. On day one and two not much will happen. On day three some bubbles should appear and the mix should have a slightly sour smell. On day four or five the mix should have many bubbles and will then be ready for use.

The sourdough starter should be stored in a refrigerator and will have a lifetime of about one month, if unattended. The lifetime can be extended by feeding the starter with a tbsp of buckwheat flour and water about once a week. It will be best to take it out of the fridge for some hours, when feeding.

Dosage: 1 tbsp starter should be enough for a 500 gr flour mix and a fermentation time of 10-15 hours. Higher quantities will shorten the fermentation time but the bread will be less tasty as some of the microorganisms work quite slowly and need their time.

The buckwheat starter can ferment other flours or flour mixes, too. There is no need to have a special starter for each flour. I tried several flour mixes and it never failed. Nevertheless, I still prefer to use a commercial baking ferment, as I mentioned earlier in my buckwheat bread recipe. It is ready in one day and survives in the fridge for months.
 

tridean

Jedi Master
broken.english said:
Buckwheat sourdough starter

A buckwheat sourdough starter can easily be made from scratch as follows:

Ingredients:

50 gr freshly ground buckwheat
50 ml warm water
optional: some home made kombucha as stabilizer

Mix ingredients and put it in a glass container with lid in order to avoid contamination. Store it in a warm place. The temperature should be 25-30°C.

Feed it twice a day with a tbsp buckwheat flour and an equal amount of water. Precision is not needed.

The whole procedure may take 4--5 days. On day one and two not much will happen. On day three some bubbles should appear and the mix should have a slightly sour smell. On day four or five the mix should have many bubbles and will then be ready for use.

The sourdough starter should be stored in a refrigerator and will have a lifetime of about one month, if unattended. The lifetime can be extended by feeding the starter with a tbsp of buckwheat flour and water about once a week. It will be best to take it out of the fridge for some hours, when feeding.

Dosage: 1 tbsp starter should be enough for a 500 gr flour mix and a fermentation time of 10-15 hours. Higher quantities will shorten the fermentation time but the bread will be less tasty as some of the microorganisms work quite slowly and need their time.

The buckwheat starter can ferment other flours or flour mixes, too. There is no need to have a special starter for each flour. I tried several flour mixes and it never failed. Nevertheless, I still prefer to use a commercial baking ferment, as I mentioned earlier in my buckwheat bread recipe. It is ready in one day and survives in the fridge for months.
Thank you broken.english, and everyone else too.

I used to be a Baker, and I baked everything from bread to pies and slices. But everything was premixed..that was how I was taught about baking. I read an article recently about how bread was made thousands of years ago, when it was real bread, and it warmed my heart! I just think we have moved too far away from some of the basics of life, probably due to time constraints etc, but the basic stuff really appeals to me. You know, like Bicarb soda for instance, I used to be scared of that stuff, seeing it in my Nana's cupboard in a plain old cardboard box, no plastic inner, it reminded me of laundry detergent, I'd think, what the heck is that stuff doing in the food cupboard? Yet I've only recently come to learn it has so many great benefits, it really should be in every home. We need to get back to basics, live in the now, our kids need to get dirty, not be afraid of germs, you know that sort of stuff :)
 
Top Bottom